Archive for January, 2012

SUNY Canton Professor Featured in Premier Academic Journal

Thursday, January 26th, 2012

New solutions to global warming will occur through 50 years of advancement in behaviorism, according to a SUNY Canton faculty member.

Professor Stephen F. Ledoux, Ph.D., recently had an article published in the centenary edition of American Scientist, the journal of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society. Ledoux’s work, “Behaviorism at 100,” was featured in the January-February 2012 issue alongside a republished article from famous academic scholar B.F. Skinner, who was among the first to recognize behaviorism as its own natural science 50 years ago.

Stephen Ledoux

SUNY Canton Professor Stephen F. Ledoux recently had an article published in the centenary edition of American Scientist, the journal of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society.

Ledoux noted the editor of the magazine waited to publish his work so it could be included in the 100th volume of the publication and provide a historical context for new readers.

“My article describes some aspects of Skinner’s behaviorism but also touches on the gradual emergence of the independent natural science of behavior, now called behaviorology,” Ledoux said. “In 1987, behaviorology became a recognized independent discipline in the natural sciences. The work I’ve done chronicles some progress made since Skinner’s “Behaviorism at 50” article appeared in 1963 as well as a range of benefits that come from these developments.”

Behaviorism influences many natural science fields, including environmental issues.

“Natural scientists are working to solve problems like global warming within the limited time frame available before we must experience its worst effects,” Ledoux said. “In that process, scientists note that solutions require changes in human behavior, yet they have lacked definitive access to a natural science of behavior. We now have that, which will be increasingly valuable for solving local and global problems.”

Ledoux is in his 30th year teaching at SUNY Canton. He has taught behaviorology in Australia, China and at the College. Although Ledoux’s research and published article concern another discipline, he is a member of the team teaching in the brand new applied psychology major, which is now accepting applicants for the 2012 semester.

He has authored several books and edited various behaviorism texts, including Lawrence Fraley’s General Behaviorology: The Natural Science of Human Behavior. Ledoux was elected to membership in the Clarkson University chapter of Sigma Xi in 1985. He received his Ph.D. in the experimental analysis of behavior from Western Michigan University in 1982 and earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from California State University, Sacramento.

American Scientist is a bimonthly science and technology magazine that is among the most widely distributed natural science journals in the country. The current issue features submissions from academics at Columbia University, Duke University, Princeton University, Brown University, Stanford University, and Harvard University, among others.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Manager, or call 315/386-7527.


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SUNY Canton Faculty Member Presents “E-Fraction” Art Exhibition at SUNY Potsdam

Thursday, January 26th, 2012

E-FractionTwo artists with ties to SUNY Canton will be using lights and snow as their paint and canvas at SUNY Potsdam.

Assistant Professor Matthew J. Burnett, who teaches in the graphic and multimedia design (GMMD) program, and Scott Fuller, a GMMD advisory board member and an associate professor at St. Joseph’s College of Maine, are presenting a new outdoor display as part of their collaborative “E-Fraction” exhibition.

The two artists are currently displaying their paintings, photographs, sculptures, and mixed media installations at SUNY Potsdam’s Gibson Gallery and will begin molding sculptural forms in snow on Monday, Jan. 30. SUNY Potsdam will host an artists’ reception to highlight the indoor and outdoor portions of the show at 5 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 2, at the Gibson Gallery. Their outdoor work will be illuminated nightly through Feb. 7 in the SUNY Potsdam Academic Quad. Both displays are free and open to the public.

“We have plenty of winter, plenty of snow and plenty of ice in our region,” Burnett said. “I love the idea of celebrating what is unusual and beautiful about winter rather than complaining about it. There is so much complexity and power in the way ice and snow form and dominate our environment.”

Last year, Burnett and Fuller used large snow sculptures as a canvas for moving projected images of their work at a large-scale St. Lawrence University installation. Their efforts were highlighted in the March 13, 2011 Boston Globe article, “Rethinking Snow.”

The pair first collaborated in 2006 to create a kinetic sculpture exhibition in Mt. Desert Island, Maine, and then again in 2008 at Saranac Lake’s winter carnival to create a large-scale interactive illuminated spiral ice structure. In addition to the St. Lawrence University exhibition, they presented their light and snow creations last year in Long Lake using old black-and-white photographs projected on their snow creations. Both artists have shown their work regionally and internationally.

Fuller said the exhibitions take a massive amount of coordination, cooperation, and direction from both artists. He and Burnett will be relying on students and faculty members from SUNY Canton and SUNY Potsdam to help create the massive outdoor snow sculptures.

“Although we’ve worked collaboratively on large environmental exhibitions, we’ve only had one traditional indoor show together,” said Fuller. “We have lots of drawings, paintings and photographs that have been developed around these installations. Our gallery exhibition showcases over five years of working together.”

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Manager, or call 315/386-7527.

 

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SUNY Canton Serves More Than 6,000 Students in 2011

Tuesday, January 24th, 2012

More students and a fresh new look made 2011 a banner year of growth and innovation at SUNY Canton.

Approximately 6,092 students enrolled at SUNY Canton during the combined terms in 2011, according to SUNY Canton President Joseph L. Kennedy, including a record fall enrollment of nearly 4,000 students.

The 2011 total unduplicated headcount figure represents a 20 percent increase in the past two calendar years. In 2009, the College had a total combined enrollment of 5,103.

SUNY Canton

“We’ve grown our enrollment annually by offering in-demand majors taught by experienced and professional faculty who prepare students for their chosen careers.” Kennedy said. “Our supplementary semesters and online enrollments are growing rapidly alongside our traditional course offerings. We are reaching more students than ever before with our competitive hands-on programs and online courses.”

Among the semesters with the greatest growth were:

  • Winterterm 2010-2011 had approximately 1,170 enrollments, up 46 percent from the previous year.
  • Summer Session 2011 had approximately 1,430 enrollments, up 16 percent from the previous year.
  • Fall 2011 semester had approximately 3,825 students, up almost 50 percent from Fall 2006, and up 75 percent from Fall 2000, breaking the College’s all-time enrollment high.

In addition to the new enrollment highpoints, the College grew in almost every way. The following are some the highlights from the 2011 calendar year.

New Majors

SUNY Canton added bachelor’s degrees in veterinary technology and health and fitness promotion. The veterinary technology degree gives students in the two-year program more advanced options and has become one of the most popular new majors for incoming freshmen. Health and fitness promotion is an extension of the physical therapist assistant program and allows continuing study options for the program’s two-year graduates.

The new programs are continuing into 2012 and the College recently announced that it would be adding a Bachelor of Science in applied psychology for the Fall 2012 Semester.

SUNY Canton Campus Aerial

New Buildings                                 

SUNY Canton celebrated the completion of the new Grasse River Suites and the new Convocation, Athletic, and Recreation Center, nicknamed Roos House, during the fall 2011 semester. The College’s two newest buildings have dramatically enhanced the overall atmosphere of the campus and significantly aided the College’s overall growth.

  • The $45 million Roos House added a new field house, ice rink, pool, fitness center, and office space for athletic and coaching staff. Between home games and student recreation, the building has become a hub of activity on campus.
  • The $26 million Grasse River Suites offers upperclassmen an independent apartment-style living option on campus and is helping the College house more students than ever before. The newest residence hall was built without funding from New York State or its taxpayers.

The College is currently planning two additional residence halls to continue its overall physical expansion.

A New Look for canton.edu

SUNY Canton made significant design changes to its website, allowing for larger images and easier user navigation. In 2011, the website received more than 2.2 million visits and more than 5 million individual page views.

The largest growth in visits came from mobile devices. The college had more than 29,000 mobile visits in 2010, and more than 89,000 mobile visits in 2011.

Additionally, the website received visits from 191 countries, including Canada, Russia, China, India, England, South Korea, Germany and Japan.

SUNY Canton Website

Updated Commercials

To highlight the ongoing growth, the college updated its television commercials. Students highlight the most relevant additions and changes at the College, including new majors, new sports, and new buildings. The two new 30-second spots can be viewed on the College’s YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/cantonpr/.

Kangaroos Move Forward

The SUNY Canton Kangaroos began its NCAA exploratory year, the first step in a process the College hopes will eventually lead to provisional and full-fledged Division III membership, The College began offering women’s volleyball and men’s golf in the past year, and new varsity teams in men’s and women’s lacrosse will begin play this spring.

College starts in High School

SUNY Canton received a $150,000 grant from the New York State Education Department in order to start the Collegiate Science and Technology Entry Program on campus. The College also received a $200,000 grant from the State Education Department enabling them to work with Ogdensburg Free Academy, Massena High School and St. Lawrence-Lewis BOCES as part of the Smart Scholars Early College High School program.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Manager, or call 315/386-7527.

 

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SUNY Canton Expands Fort Drum Courses

Thursday, January 19th, 2012

Soldiers stationed at Fort Drum can take legal studies and powersports performance and repair courses on-base beginning Monday, Jan. 23.

“Our latest courses were selected in response to the growing demand for paralegal professionals,” said Carl J. Disalvatore, an adjunct instructor and retired Judge Advocate General’s Corps Colonel. “Our ties with Fort Drum allow U.S. Army soldiers stationed locally to start taking face-to-face courses without commuting. If they chose to continue with the courses in the legal studies program, they can enroll online and earn their four-year degree from anywhere in the world with Internet access.”

SUNY Canton - 10th Mountain Division

The College’s schedule of courses at Fort Drum includes seven-week three-credit SUNY Canton courses in the following:

  • American legal system (LEST101) with Disalvatore from 5:30 to 8:45 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays.
  • Business law 1 (BSAD201) with Disalvatore from 5:30 to 8:45 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays.
  • Engine and power transmission services (MSPT 110) with Instructor Mark R. Hill from 5 to 8:50 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays.
  • A later powersports performance and repair class, marine propulsion systems (MSPT 130) with Instructor Neil A. Haney, will be held from 5 to 8:50 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays beginning March 19.

The College began outreach originally began offering one powersports course during the fall 2011 semester.  Shortly following the new course announcement, SUNY Canton was recognized as a 2012 Military Friendly School by G.I. Jobs magazine for the second straight year.

For more information about SUNY Canton’s Fort Drum courses, or any SUNY Canton courses, contact SUNY Canton Admissions, 315-386-7123, or email admissions@canton.edu.

 

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SUNY Canton Unveils New Four-Year Applied Psychology Degree

Saturday, January 14th, 2012

The new program will begin for the Fall 2012 semester and students can apply for admission immediately.

SUNY Canton’s newest Bachelor of Science degree will prepare students for direct employment in human services fields and will address the shortage of well-trained professional applicants for area organizations.

The College recently received approval from the State University of New York and the State Education Department to begin offering a new applied psychology program for the Fall 2012 semester.

“Psychology is one of the most popular majors for entering freshmen,” said SUNY Canton President Joseph L. Kennedy. “We’ve created our own version of the popular program by designing a degree that allows students to graduate and immediately start their chosen careers. Adapting career-driven educational strategies are really what we do best at SUNY Canton.”

The addition of this program will have an impact locally, concurrent with SUNY’s system wide plans to target growth most needed most in regional economies and by providing a strong workforce.

“I thank both SUNY Administration and Senator Patty Ritchie for backing this program,” Kennedy added. “Their wisdom will help us supply a new contingent of professionals to address the shortage of qualified employees at our area agencies.”

According to the U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics employment is projected to grow faster than the average for all occupations, and about 54 percent of jobs are in healthcare and social assistance industries.

The College has received letters of support expressing interest in hiring graduates from the program from area agencies including St. Lawrence NYSARC; United Helpers, Inc.; Cerebral Palsy of Northern New York; and area autism advocacy groups.

“We need employees with a solid educational background in applied behavioral analysis,” said Daphne A. Pickert, the CEO and executive director of St. Lawrence NYSARC. “We are very grateful SUNY Canton will be able to provide graduates with those qualities.”

Pickert was involved in developing the program with both Kennedy and SUNY Canton faculty members to ensure students would graduate with the most employable skills.

“Applied psychology will be the first degree with a technological application of the social sciences at SUNY Canton,” said Carli C. Schiffner, SUNY Canton provost and vice president for academic affairs. “It will readily augment our current courses in law enforcement leadership, business, criminal investigation, nursing, and health services management, among other programs.”

Students entering the program should have an interest in learning about how to work with people, including in special needs settings, according to Professor Emeritus John T. Nixon, Ph.D., the lead faculty member in the applied psychology program.

“We will emphasize the ability to understand the needs of clients and consumers in a variety of human services fields,” Nixon said. “In these settings, employees need counseling skills and need to recognize intervention and adaptive strategies.”

Courses in the program include developmental psychology, abnormal psychology, intervention strategies in human services, and professional ethics courses. “We are going to get students out into the field as quickly as possible through internships and in-class placements,” Nixon said.

Internships with area social service agencies will be especially beneficial for students looking to gain employment locally. The College has seen numerous students hired through their credit-bearing internships with partnering agencies and companies in other four-year degree programs.

The program consists primarily of face-to-face courses, but students can fulfill some of their general education requirements through SUNY Canton OnLine.

Applied psychology joins the College’s newest four-year programs including veterinary technology, sports management, health and fitness promotion, and several new offerings in the engineering technology curricula. The program is the sixth bachelor’s degree available through the College’s School of Business and Liberal Arts and the second Bachelor of Science degree at SUNY Canton.

More information about the new major is available at: http://www.canton.edu/business/psyc/

To apply for the program, contact SUNY Canton Admissions by phone, 315-386-7123 (800-388-7123), or email admissions@canton.edu.

 

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SUNY Canton Applications up 40 Percent

Wednesday, January 11th, 2012

Future students should apply early to gain placement in the College’s most popular programs.

Students continue to flock to SUNY Canton.

Applications for Fall 2012 are up nearly 40 percent over last year’s record-breaking totals and the College is anticipating another year of all-time enrollment highs.

“We are continuing the SUNY Canton tradition of breaking enrollment records,” said SUNY Canton President Joseph L. Kennedy.  “We’ve accepted approximately 1,400 students to date for Fall 2012, compared to 991 at this time last year. Having such a large increase at this point in the admissions process allows us to increase our selectivity to create an academically stronger incoming class.”

To date, the College has received approximately 3,600 applications, compared to 2,600 applications at the beginning of 2011.

SUNY Canton Applications By Year

SUNY Canton has had record-breaking enrollment for the past four years. The Fall 2011 semester had approximately 3,825 students, up almost 50 percent from Fall 2006 and up an incredible 75 percent from Fall 2000.

Contributing factors to the College’s growth include new bachelor’s degrees added during the previous few years. The College has received approximately 140 applications for the completely new four-year veterinary technology program, making it among the most popular bachelor’s degree programs added in the past year. The College’s new sports management program has received approximately 126 applications already.

“With popular standing majors like criminal investigation, nursing, and the engineering technology curricula, these new options are attracting a wider selection of applicants who are interested in our four year degrees,” said Nicole Campbell, the College’s director of admissions. “Because we have such a high volume of applications, students should apply early for the Fall 2012 semester to secure a spot in their chosen major.”

There has been a 30 percent increase in students applying for admission into the graphic and multimedia design program, a 20 percent increase for nursing, and criminal investigation applications are up approximately 15 percent. Overall applications to the combined engineering technology curricula are up almost 90 percent.

“Last year we received approximately 5,800 applications for the fall semester,” added Campbell. “We appear to be well on our way to hitting a new all-time high this year, and maybe even topping the 6,000 mark for the first time in the College’s history. The people in our admissions office have been working hard to keep up with such a fantastic increase. I applaud them for their dedication to serving our prospective students and their families.”

Early this year, the College opened the new Grasse River Suites residence hall to accommodate its expanding student population. The apartment style living complex is designed primarily to offer greater independent on-campus housing for upperclassmen. SUNY Canton also recently celebrated the completion of its new athletic and convocation center, nicknamed Roos House.

For more information on how to apply, visit www.canton.edu/admissions, contact 315-386-7123 or 800-288-7123, or email admissions@canton.edu.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Manager, or call 315/386-7527.


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SUNY Canton President Responds to SUNY Chancellor’s Nancy L. Zimpher’s Address

Tuesday, January 10th, 2012

SUNY CantonSUNY Canton President Joseph L. Kennedy applauded SUNY Chancellor Nancy L. Zimpher’s plan to create a disciplined system of success during her annual State of the University Address.

Kennedy said that SUNY Canton best fits within the overall plans to create more online courses for all SUNY students, share services, and to extend outreach to pre-college educational programs.

“Chancellor Zimpher has marked a path for the success of our current and future generations of students,” Kennedy said. “We are no strangers to growth, adaptation, and innovation. We’ve established a clear model for successful online learning through SUNY Canton OnLine, and hope to expand our offerings to more students from more places.”

The President explained that the college is currently exploring new ways to share resources among colleges, including nearby SUNY Potsdam and researching ways to extend shared services with SUNY Plattsburgh. Earlier this semester, Kennedy created a dedicated taskforce to initiate discussions with other colleges about shared administrative services to better accommodate students.

“A critical component in the overall transformation the Chancellor pointed out has already begun locally,” Kennedy said. “Earlier this semester, we hosted senior leaders from SUNY’s Information Technology team. We’ve fared very well in their overall expectations and our systems fit well within the broader scope of the SUNY System. We look forward to working with SUNY further to expand collaborations among colleges.”

Additionally, the College has extended its high school outreach, offering college-level courses in nearby high schools including Ogdensburg Free Academy and Massena Central through a New York State Department of Education grant. The new program allows high school students to begin accumulating college-level credits prior to graduation. Additionally, the College has a special project with Heuvelton Central High School allowing more than 40 senior-level students to earn six college credits in English, and ongoing distance learning initiatives at area high schools.

“Students who earn college credits in high school are more likely to graduate and successfully attend college,” Kennedy noted. “It helps students create a realistic expectation of college-level courses. We are offering courses that will help them when they enter SUNY Canton or almost any other SUNY college.”

SUNY Canton offers almost 200 online courses each semester, and more than 4,000 students are scheduled to enroll in at least one course each semester. The college also has eight completely online bachelor’s degrees, which increases accessibility to community college and two-year students.

SUNY Canton additionally offers high-needs majors that help students graduate from college and step directly into a career. “By targeting the careers with the highest growth and need, we are offering our students a competitive advantage for future success within today’s economy,” he said.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Manager, or call 315/386-7527.

 

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U.S. News and World Report: SUNY Canton Among Top-Ranked Online Colleges in the Nation

Tuesday, January 10th, 2012

US News RankingsSUNY Canton’s online courses and degree programs are among the best in the nation according to recently released rankings by U.S.News & World Report.

SUNY Canton was the highest ranked college or university in New York State in Student Services and Technology in the publications’ first ever Top Online Education Program Rankings, announced Tuesday.

“We have stayed ahead of the curve when it comes to online learning for several years and we are proud to see our time and energy recognized when compared to colleges from across the country,” said SUNY Canton President Joseph L. Kennedy. “Our consistent online enrollment growth has shown us that people trust SUNY Canton when it comes to an affordable and easily accessible online education and this honor reaffirms the reasons for that trust.”

SUNY Canton ranked 34th nationally in Student Services and Technology, finishing ahead of all other schools in New York including Marist College, SUNY Delhi, Rochester Institute of Technology, and Utica College. The College was also ranked 114th in the nation in Teaching Practices and Student Engagement.

The College’s online efforts reinforce SUNY’s system-wide efforts to become a worldwide leader in online education, as noted by SUNY Chancellor Nancy Zimpher in her recent State of the University Address. Her remarks noted that SUNY has the potential to be the nation’s most extensive distance learning environment, connecting students with faculty and peers from across the state and throughout the world and giving them the access to the best in open educational resources.

“We were pleased to hear the Chancellor’s plans for SUNY’s future, particularly the ‘get down to business’ approach toward online education, lowering costs and enhancing productivity,” said President Kennedy. “We will continue to strive to reach and surpass the goals she has set for us. It’s an exciting time of great opportunity to progress forward for both SUNY Canton and the SUNY system.”

SUNY Canton’s online course offerings have become wildly popular over the last several years. Eleven years ago, the College offered four online classes and had 99 enrollments. To meet the demands of students today, the number of online courses offered is close to 200 and more than 4,000 students are scheduled to be enrolled in at least one course this year.

In addition to its online offerings during the academic year, SUNY Canton offers one of the largest winter and summer class sessions in the state. Close to 75 percent of students who take classes during either session each year are from other institutions from across New York and the country.

“Winterterm and Summer Session are so popular because they don’t require students to travel to campus or give up employment opportunities over their breaks,” said Director of Information Services and Online Learning Kyle Brown. “Online courses provide students with the flexibility and accessibility to educational opportunities they might not have otherwise been able to do.”

The College’s reputation in online learning is aided by the faculty’s extensive experience in providing a sophisticated online education. “The faculty members embrace online education and value the flexibility of learning online,” Brown said. “Teaching online courses isn’t for everyone. We select our faculty based on their ability to engage students in the online learning environment. They do incredible work.”

More information on the rankings is available now at www.usnews.com/online-education.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Manager, or call 315/386-7527.

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SUNY Canton Mourns the Passing of Richard W. Miller

Friday, January 6th, 2012

Richard MillerProminent patron’s legacy lives on through memories of his generosity, dedication, and charisma.

One of the most well-respected and generous SUNY Canton faculty members in College history has passed away.

Distinguished Professor Emeritus and longstanding Foundation Board Member Richard W. Miller died earlier this morning (Friday, January 6, 2012) at his West Main Street home in Canton. He was 93 years old.

“Dick’s passing saddens me greatly,” said SUNY Canton President Joseph L. Kennedy. “In addition to being one of the most respected individuals at the College, he and his wife Irene were personal friends of my family. I’m certain many would join me in saying that their lives have been enriched through his friendship and ongoing dedication to the College and greater Canton Community.”

Mr. Miller began teaching at SUNY Canton (then known as the Agricultural and Technical Institute) on June 7, 1946. He was a professor and Department Chairman of the Electrical Engineering Technology Department. In 1975, he was named an Outstanding Educator in America and the year following he won the State University of New York Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching.  In 1982, he received the SUNY Canton College Council’s Distinguished Faculty Award, and in 1990 the Council presented him with the Distinguished Citizen Award. He organized the SUNY Canton chapter of Tau Alpha Pi National Honor Society for Engineering Technology and was an esteemed advisor to the Alpha chapter of the Theta Gamma Fraternity. He retired in 1983.

Richard Miller

“Dick was one of the most influential faculty members to ever teach at SUNY Canton,” Kennedy said. “He assisted countless generations of successful graduates during his career. After he retired, he created scholarships to benefit incoming students. His legacy will live on across the campus.”

In 2003, Mr. Miller became the first donor in College history to make a million dollar donation to the SUNY Canton Foundation. His unrestricted donation led the college to name the then newly constructed campus center in his honor.

“I have had three loves of my life: The first, my wife Irene; the second, my family; and the third, this College,” Mr. Miller said at the Richard W. Miller Campus Center Dedication and Ribbon Cutting Ceremony.

He followed his donation with an additional $50,000 gift to the College in honor of his longstanding friendship with the Kennedys in 2010. Combined with his annual scholarship, Mr. Miller donated more than $1.6 million to SUNY Canton.

“Mr. Miller’s profound impact on SUNY Canton can be seen from anywhere on campus,” said Director of Alumni and Development Peggy S. Levato. “His generosity allowed us to make immeasurable progress at the College. He gave his time and heart to this college and for that, we will forever be indebted to him.”

Many alumni and current students knew Mr. Miller through his frequent involvement in campus following his retirement. In the past year he was a guest of honor at the College’s Kingston Fireplace Dedication, Holiday Luncheon, Scholarship Luncheon, and Alumni Weekend Celebration, among others. He attended his 65th consecutive commencement ceremony in 2011.

Update (Monday, Jan 9): Calling hours are 3 to 6 p.m. Thursday, January 12, at Lawrence Funeral Home, 21 Park St., Canton, with a service at 10:30 a.m. Friday, January 13 at the First Presbyterian Church, 17 Park St., and a reception to follow at the Richard W. Miller Campus Center at SUNY Canton. A Masonic service will be held on Thursday 5:45 p.m. Interment will be in Evergreen Cemetery in the spring. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests contributions in Richard’s name to the Canton Neighborhood Center, 5 West St., Canton Methodist Church Food Kitchen, or the Richard W. Miller Scholarship at SUNY Canton. Condolences may be sent to www.lawrencefuneralhome.org.

A complete obituary submitted my Mr. Miller’s family can be viewed at http://www.canton.edu/news/index.php/miller-obituary/

Please use the comments section below to share your memories and reflections.

Update (Saturday Jan. 7): SUNY Canton College Council Chair Ronald M. O’Neill’s Statement on the Passing of Richard W. Miller

“Yesterday, SUNY Canton lost a great friend.  Today, on behalf of the entire College Council, we mourn Dick’s passing and celebrate his life. Our thoughts and prayers go out to his family and many friends.”

“Dick was truly one of a kind.  His contributions to SUNY Canton and the community cannot be measured in mere dollars.  Teacher, mentor, friend, supporter, Dick was all these and much more. For more than six decades, Dick gave of his time, energy and money to ensuring SUNY Canton would continue to grow and flourish.”

“His dedication and fierce loyalty set a shining example for our campus and the greater North Country.  While we will miss his presence at events, and his wise counsel and wit, we know that his legacy at SUNY Canton is enduring, which is just the way he planned it.”

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