Archive for the ‘Canino School of Engineering Tech’ Category

Two Student Artists Display in Southworth Library

Wednesday, October 12th, 2011

Two SUNY Canton students are displaying their artwork at SUNY Canton’s Southworth Library. The exhibit was planned by Assistant Professor Matthew J. Burnett, as an ongoing effort to help students gain exhibition experience before graduation.

Dan Grant

Daniel R. Grant, a junior graphic and multimedia design student from Norwood hangs his work.

 

Tim Riley

Timothy Riley, a second-semester liberal arts general studies student from Dekalb Junction, helps design the exhibition.

Related Posts:

SUNY Canton Powersports Class Starts at Fort Drum

Wednesday, September 7th, 2011

SUNY Canton is starting a fast-paced powersports performance and repair course to recently deployed U.S. Army soldiers at Fort Drum.

“This program is part of our outreach with the SUNY North Country Consortium,” said SUNY Canton President Joseph L. Kennedy. “As a premiere college for soldiers, veterans, and their families, we seek to offer our in-demand academic programs where they will be utilized the best. In this case, we’ll bring our class to Fort Drum, rather then having the soldiers come to us.”

Powersports

SUNY Canton powersports performance and repair student Stephen A. Weston of Potsdam helps Instructor Mark R. Hill load Polaris snowmobiles, motorcycles, and four-wheelers destined for Fort Drum.

The three-credit seven-week powersports service course (MSPT101) began at 5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 6, at the Outdoor and Recreation Facility on the post. Mark R. Hill, the Powersports program instructor, said it was offered in a condensed version to minimize the time commitment for soldiers.

“We’ll be bringing approximately $50,000 worth of snowmobiles, motorcycles, and all-terrain vehicles – all donated by Polaris Industries – to Fort Drum for our newest students to work with during the course,” Hill said. “This is one of the first courses that we offer in the one-year program. Students find it very personally and professionally rewarding.”

Students working on snowmobile

SUNY Canton partners Polaris to provide certification training at the main campus, allowing students access to the latest Polaris line to complete their course requirements. Students diagnose, troubleshoot, repair and even rebuild the recreational vehicles during the one-year program.

At SUNY Canton, powersports performance and repair is a career-driven one-year certificate program. The program is part of the College’s ladder curriculum, allowing students to transfer into associate degree programs, including automotive technology, or a bachelor’s degree program that best fits each individual student’s interest.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Manager, or call 315/386-7527.

 

Related Posts:

SUNY Canton Team Builds Best Steel Bridge

Thursday, May 5th, 2011
Steel Bridge Team

Michael D. Woodruff, a civil and environmental technology major from Vermontville and L. Tom Woodruff, a civil engineering technology major from Hermon, rapidly assemble their steel bridge. Michael is the student president of the SUNY Canton ASCE-AISC Student Steel Bridge Team.

SUNY Canton students built a better bridge faster than their competitors, placing first in the Upstate New York Regional Competition in Montreal, Canada.

The College’s student chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers and American Institute of Steel Construction competes almost every year in the regional and national-level intercollegiate challenge.

“SUNY Canton dominated the field of competitors and won first place in all categories judged,” said Paul D. Hitchman, a faculty advisor for the team of students. “We blew the competition out of the water with the overall stiffness, or rigidity, of our entry.”

The team clocked a 8.24 minute overall construction speed, with one penalty for a dropped bolt, according to the team’s president and civil and environmental technology major Michael D. Woodruff of Vermontville. “Our closest competition was the University of Buffalo with a 9.025 (minute) construction speed,” he said.

The challenge was to build a bridge over a scenic river for a new state park road allowing access to remote areas. SUNY Canton’s team prepares for a full academic year before the competition. The students design and experiment to solve the challenge before creating a steel bridge that they can rapidly assemble in front of a panel of judges. The bridge is then loaded with weights to test its integrity. Each team is evaluated on display, lightness, stiffness, speed, economy, and efficiency.

The students pitted their bridge design and building abilities against teams including those from the University at Buffalo, Rochester Institute of Technology, Cornell University, U.S. Military Academy at West Point, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Ecole de Technologie Superieure, Hudson Valley Community College, and Clarkson University.

Tom Woodruff

L. Tom Woodruff, a SUNY Canton civil engineering technology major from Hermon assembles the steel bridge during a practice session.

The team is now preparing to reclaim their 2009 national title at the 2011 National Student Steel Bridge Competition to be held on May 20 and 21 at Texas A&M University.

To support the team, please contact the SUNY Canton Foundation at 315.386.7127 or email foundation@canton.edu. Numerous faculty and staff members at the College support the team and contribute to this cause through payroll deductions and personal donations.

 

Related Posts:

SUNY Canton Honors Convocation Named for Former Dean

Tuesday, April 19th, 2011

Distinguished Professor Emeritus Arthur G. Hurlbut of Canton will be the special guest at the College’s annual award ceremony and Scholarly Activity Celebration during the first week of May.

The 2011 SUNY Canton Honors Convocation has been named for a former Canino School of Engineering Technology dean who helped instill the College’s career-driven educational values.

The Arthur G. Hurlbut Honors Convocation will be held at 4:15 p.m. Wednesday, May 4, in the Richard W. Miller Campus Center’s Intramural Gym. More than 125 students will be honored for academic success and outstanding achievement at the event. Hurlbut will also be a guest speaker at the Scholarly Activities Celebration, with presentations beginning at 6 p.m. Thursday, May 5, in the Kingston Theater, and a poster and artwork presentation beginning at 10 a.m. Friday, May 6, in the Southworth Library. All events are free and open to the public.

“Art helped students launch their careers straight out of college as both a professor and a dean in the Canino School of Engineering Technology,” noted Interim Provost Linda D. Pellett. “He assisted with or helped create several of the College’s four-year degrees, including the popular alternative and renewable energy systems program.”

Hurlbut is a 1965 Alumnus of SUNY Canton. He continued his education at Clarkson University earning his bachelor’s degree in 1969, master’s degree in mechanical engineering in 1970, and his Ph.D. in engineering science in 1985. He was hired by the late Distinguished Professor Emeritus Harry E. King to work in the air conditioning engineering technology program in 1973.

Pictured is Distinguished Professor Emeritus and 2011 SUNY Canton Honors Convocation Namesake Arthur G. Hurlbut in his family-run sugar shack. Art and his son Andy run Hurlbut’s Maple Products in Canton.

“Art was one of the most dedicated well-liked faculty members in our school,” noted Michael J. Newtown, director of the alternative and renewable energy systems program. “He was always available to assist his students outside of class. Over the years he developed many industrial contacts to ensure excellent job placement for students after graduation.”

His educational philosophy was to make sure his students understood both the theory and the practical application of the subject matter. He emphasized open communications and teamwork while students created their professional projects. “As I was teaching, I was always learning,” Hurlbut said. “I learned a lot from my professional colleagues, the college’s administrators, and the students. I’m humbled to be recognized alongside the students at Honors Convocation.”

Hurlbut received the SUNY Canton Distinguished Faculty Award in 2002, and the E.K. Campbell Award of Merit from American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers, Inc., (ASHRAE) in 2006.

He also advised SUNY Canton’s ASHRAE student chapter and the heating and air conditioning club. He co-advised the Beta Mu Chapter of the Tau Alpha Pi Engineering Technology National Honor Society.

Hurlbut’s community involvement matched his exemplary service to the College. He shared his expertise as a consultant with many local architects and has volunteered design work for SUNY Canton, the Canton Pavilion, Canton Central School, the Canton Library, Cooperative Extension Learning Center, and 4-H Camp Overlook. He designed and installed the air conditioning system in the College’s Alumni House on Stillman Drive.

Art lives in Canton with his wife, Diane. They have three grown children, Andrew, David, and Kimberly Trombly, and one newborn grandson, Noah Trombly. He enjoys maple sugaring, piloting his own plane, snowmobiling, hunting, and camping.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.


Related Posts:

Engineering Scholarships Available at SUNY Canton

Friday, April 8th, 2011

A handful of prestigious, full tuition scholarships remain available for students planning to study in SUNY Canton’s four-year engineering technology programs.

In 2010, the College received a National Science Foundation grant to provide 18 Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Scholarships. There are several STEM scholarships left for the Fall 2011 semester. Each scholarship provides students with $7,200 a year, or $28,800 over four years. Annual tuition for bachelor’s degree programs at SUNY Canton is $4,970 for New York State residents.

Justin Seymour, a SUNY Canton electrical technology student and National Science Foundation scholarship recipient from Elmira.

In order to be eligible, applicants must be accepted into one of several SUNY Canton Canino School of Engineering Technology programs and be able to provide: proof of U.S. Citizenship or permanent residency; a transcript with Regents exam scores of 80 percent or higher, or a transfer GPA of 3.0; and household financial records.

Megan Sampier, a SUNY Canton engineering science student and National Science Foundation scholarship recipient from Colton.

Additionally, applicants will need two letters of recommendation and will need to author a 500-word essay. The scholarships will be awarded to qualified applicants until all remaining slots are filled. Students are encouraged to apply as soon as possible upon acceptance into a qualified program.

Graduates of the College’s engineering technology programs are among the most sought-after employees. The Canino School of Engineering Technology offers a low student to faculty ratio with hands-on access to advanced laboratories and learning facilities.

Terrance E. Davis, a SUNY Canton alternative and renewable energy systems major and National Science Foundation scholarship recipient from the Bronx.

For more information, visit www.canton.edu/nsfsstem, or contact Julie Parkman, associate director of advancement in the SUNY Canton Foundation, parkmanj@canton.edu, 315-386-7746 or the Director of the NSF STEM Scholarship, Lawretta Ononye, associate professor of physics, ononyel@canton.edu, 315-386-7521.

 

Related Posts:

SUNY Canton Mechanical Engineering Technology Students Create Shock Value

Monday, March 28th, 2011

A broken all-terrain vehicle shock helped lead a team of SUNY Canton mechanical engineering technology students to become finalists in a national competition.

Pictured are (l to r) mechanical engineering technology students Joel R. Landry of Malone, Brandon M. Trimboli of Norwood, and Kyle C. Szelestey of Salisbury Mills.

Joel R. Landry of Malone, Kyle C. Szelestey of Salisbury Mills, and Brandon M. Trimboli of Norwood recently found out that their project was among the top 10 considerations in the nation for the Dimension Printing 2011 Extreme Redesign Challenge at the collegiate level.

The project took shape when another student blew out the rear shock on his Honda ATV. Instead of repairing the damaged unit, the three aspiring engineers collaborated in their courses to design a brand new suspension system.

“Our (Advanced Computer Drafting) class assignment was to create a real-world solution using modern materials,” Trimboli explained. “We decided to reverse engineer the shock to improve its performance.”

Using what they had learned in their studies, the students generated renderings and designs of a brand-new shock creating a lower center of gravity on the vehicle and better overall control for the rider. Elements of their design have the potential to become high-end replacement parts within the ATV industry.

“Our design is top-notch,” Szelestey said. “We are curious where this project will take us from here.”

To take their project past the initial design phase, the students began printing out scale reproductions of the individual parts on the College’s Dimension Printer. They then assembled each light beige component into a functioning plastic reproduction of their concept.

Assistant Professor Daniel J. Miller said that the addition of the rapid prototyping machine has added further potential for experimentation and invention within the Mechanical Engineering Technology program.

“Students previously had to cast or mill prototypes in metal,” Miller said. “Now they can run a program to print out scale models of their projects in plastic.”

Other student projects that have taken shape on the Dimension Printer include a scale-model working wind turbine and custom lightweight bicycle parts.

“One of our strengths is that we encourage students to apply theoretical calculations in real-world applications,” noted school Dean David J. Wells. “We emphasize efficiency and innovation all of our technology related curricula.”

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.


Related Posts:

SUNY Canton to Host BPI Certification Presentation

Friday, March 18th, 2011

North Country community members interested in getting involved in energy efficiency projects are encouraged to attend an upcoming presentation at SUNY Canton.

Arthur S. Garno, a Building Performance Institute (BPI) Site Coordinator from SUNY Canton, is offering an informational presentation beginning at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, March 23 in Payson Hall Room 124 on the College’s campus. There is no cost to attend the session.

The presentation will be geared towards those looking to become a BPI-accredited contracting company for construction projects that include energy efficiency measures. BPI is a leading developer of technical standards, training and professional credentialing for home performance assessments, building envelope retrofits and HVAC system retrofits.

SUNY Canton is the area’s training center for becoming a BPI-certified home energy auditor.

Only BPI-accredited contractors with BPI-certified staff are eligible to participate in New York State Energy Research and Development Authority’s (NYSERDA) Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® program that provides incentives to homeowners for energy efficiency retrofit work.

 

For more information or to RSVP for the event, contact Garno at (315) 386-7197 or garnoa@canton.edu. Walk-ins are welcome.

 

Related Posts:

Great Majors Lead to Great Careers at the Spring Career Fair

Wednesday, March 9th, 2011

Many companies routinely recruit SUNY Canton students for the knowledge and skills they have acquired during their education. Successful alumni recently returned to recruit future generations of employees at the College’s recent Career Fair.

“The engineering technology curricula were very sought after this spring,” said Daniel Miller, an assistant professor and career services coordinator. “The demand for our graduates re-emphasizes our mission to provide great majors that lead to great careers.”

In the video, alumni explain in their own words what distinguishes a SUNY Canton from other college graduates and highlight some of the recent changes at the College.

The Career Fair is a direct employment outreach initiative facilitated by Office of Career Services with support from the SUNY Canton Foundation and Alumni offices. For more information about careers available for students and graduates, visit http://www.canton.edu/career_services/login.htm.

 

 

Related Posts:

SUNY Canton’s Canino School Adds New Bachelor’s Degree

Wednesday, December 15th, 2010

SUNY Canton’s Canino School of Engineering Technology has added another four-year degree program to its growing list of offerings.

The New York State Education Department and the State University of New York have approved a bachelor’s of technology degree in mechanical technology. The College is now accepting students into the program with classes scheduled to begin in the Fall 2011 semester, SUNY Canton President Joseph L. Kennedy announced.

“In the last few months, we have added three in-demand technology degree programs that speak to the needs of the region and industry,” Kennedy said. “The faculty members in the Canino School of Engineering Technology do an outstanding job of listening to the programmatic needs of students who are looking to continue getting a quality education at an affordable price. They respond to those needs while also ensuring what we offer is directly aligned with what employers are looking for.”

The curriculum stems directly from the highly successful ABET-accredited mechanical engineering technology and air conditioning technology associate degree program at the College. The new degree will allow graduates from the current two-year program to further their studies without having to transfer to distant or more expensive institutions.

More information about the new program can be found at: http://www.canton.edu/csoet/mech/

“In recent years, I have worked with a growing number of students coming to the program who have intentions of pursuing a bachelor’s degree,” said Daniel J. Miller, assistant professor of mechanical engineering technology and program director of the two year degree program. “The current associate degree program historically sees 100 percent placement upon graduation with two-thirds of those graduates continuing their education elsewhere. Our hands-on approach to learning and problem solving, as well as our hard working and dedicated faculty and staff, are the main reasons students enroll and want to stay at SUNY Canton. We provide an education that assures them their degree will enable them to find work within the industry.”

There will be two tracks within the program: mechanical manufacturing and heating; and ventilation and air conditioning. Students who complete the degree program will be able to analyze, design and implement machine and manufacturing processes, air conditioning and building energy systems, and the up-to-date automation and control systems and their applications in the related field.

Students in the program will also benefit from the recent completed renovation of the mechanical engineering technology labs in the Nevaldine Technology Center.

Dr. Lin Tian, assistant professor of air conditioning engineering technology, prepared the proposal and will serve as the program coordinator. She anticipates 20-25 students to enroll in the major this upcoming fall, with enrollment growing as large as 70 within five years.

“No matter the track a student pursues, they will have the professionalism required within the engineering field, project analysis experience and management skills that meet the industrial needs of high-level engineering technicians,” Tian said. “The faculty members are excited about this opportunity to better serve our students and the community.”

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, mechanical engineers held the fourth highest employment of all engineering in 2008. Many mechanical engineering professionals fall into the industrial engineering category, the third highest engineering employment sector. Extensive continued growth over the next ten years is expected.

“Our strong faculty support will make this program successful,” said Dr. David Wells, dean of the Canino School of Engineering Technology. “It provides an exceptional complement to our other new bachelor’s degrees in electrical and civil and environmental technology. We help prepare our students for a wide array of career opportunities. The approval of this degree program furthers that mission.”

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.


Related Posts:

SUNY Canton Receives Nearly $600,000 NSF Grant for Scholarships

Friday, July 30th, 2010

Over the next four years, SUNY Canton will receive a $596,160 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to be used for scholarships given to engineering technology students.

Dr. Lawretta Ononye, associate professor of physics, serves as the principal investigator and director of SUNY Canton’s project proposal. She is assisted by colleague Dr. Stephen Frempong, professor of electrical engineering technology and co-principal investigator of the proposal, as well as JoAnne Fassinger, the College’s grants coordinator.

“This is a monumental accomplishment for us as we continue to do everything we can to make college an option for all students, irrespective of their economic circumstance,” said SUNY Canton President Joseph L. Kennedy. “I thank the efforts of Dr. Ononye, Dr. Frempong and JoAnne for working as hard as they did over the last few years to make this a reality for SUNY Canton and our future students.”

SUNY Canton’s project, entitled “Scholarships for Engineering Technology,” will be funded through the NSF Scholarship for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (S-STEM) project. It will provide scholarships for 18 full-time students who have demonstrated superior academic performance but face economic hardships. An annual award of $7,200 for up to four years will help support the scholars through their degree completion at the College.

The scholarships will be awarded to students in pursuit of a bachelor’s degree or enrolled in a two-year associate degree program with plans of earning their four-year degree.

“A grant of this magnitude is an extraordinary achievement for SUNY Canton and brings us to a new level of grantsmanship,” said Fassinger, who noted that the NSF award is a first for the College. “Grants from the National Science Foundation are considered to be among the most prestigious and competitive in higher education. It is truly a sign of SUNY Canton’s tremendous growth in all areas.”

Programs at the College affected by the S-STEM project include electrical engineering technology, mechanical engineering technology, civil engineering technology, engineering science and alternative and renewable energy.

“I’m very excited that the countless hours and energy we put into the proposal has paid off,” Ononye said. “This award will encourage all students to consider engineering, science and technology, including underrepresented groups and women.”

Frempong emphasized the S-STEM project is of great significance to SUNY Canton and its Canino School of Engineering Technology.  “It has both intellectual merit and broader impact,” he stated. “The funding will help with new support programs, including a mentoring program, STEM seminar, and a tutoring center. We will have the resources to develop a summer program to boost scholars’ physics and mathematics backgrounds. It will also allow us to offer field trips to local businesses and into industry.

“It will enhance the ongoing efforts at SUNY Canton by promoting retention and building a community of scholars,” Frempong added. “It will assist in the placement of students in the workforce or graduate school.”

According to NSF’s website, the S-STEM program “makes grants to institutions of higher education to support scholarships for academically talented, financially needy students, enabling them to enter the workforce following completion of an associate; baccalaureate; or graduate-level degree in science and engineering disciplines.”

Institutions receiving awards are responsible for selecting scholarship recipients, reporting demographic information about student scholars, and managing the S-STEM project on campus.

For more information about SUNY Canton’s S-STEM project, visit: http://www.canton.edu/nsfsstem/.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.


Related Posts: