Archive for the ‘Faculty’ Category

SUNY Canton Professor Featured in Premier Academic Journal

Thursday, January 26th, 2012

New solutions to global warming will occur through 50 years of advancement in behaviorism, according to a SUNY Canton faculty member.

Professor Stephen F. Ledoux, Ph.D., recently had an article published in the centenary edition of American Scientist, the journal of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society. Ledoux’s work, “Behaviorism at 100,” was featured in the January-February 2012 issue alongside a republished article from famous academic scholar B.F. Skinner, who was among the first to recognize behaviorism as its own natural science 50 years ago.

Stephen Ledoux

SUNY Canton Professor Stephen F. Ledoux recently had an article published in the centenary edition of American Scientist, the journal of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society.

Ledoux noted the editor of the magazine waited to publish his work so it could be included in the 100th volume of the publication and provide a historical context for new readers.

“My article describes some aspects of Skinner’s behaviorism but also touches on the gradual emergence of the independent natural science of behavior, now called behaviorology,” Ledoux said. “In 1987, behaviorology became a recognized independent discipline in the natural sciences. The work I’ve done chronicles some progress made since Skinner’s “Behaviorism at 50” article appeared in 1963 as well as a range of benefits that come from these developments.”

Behaviorism influences many natural science fields, including environmental issues.

“Natural scientists are working to solve problems like global warming within the limited time frame available before we must experience its worst effects,” Ledoux said. “In that process, scientists note that solutions require changes in human behavior, yet they have lacked definitive access to a natural science of behavior. We now have that, which will be increasingly valuable for solving local and global problems.”

Ledoux is in his 30th year teaching at SUNY Canton. He has taught behaviorology in Australia, China and at the College. Although Ledoux’s research and published article concern another discipline, he is a member of the team teaching in the brand new applied psychology major, which is now accepting applicants for the 2012 semester.

He has authored several books and edited various behaviorism texts, including Lawrence Fraley’s General Behaviorology: The Natural Science of Human Behavior. Ledoux was elected to membership in the Clarkson University chapter of Sigma Xi in 1985. He received his Ph.D. in the experimental analysis of behavior from Western Michigan University in 1982 and earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from California State University, Sacramento.

American Scientist is a bimonthly science and technology magazine that is among the most widely distributed natural science journals in the country. The current issue features submissions from academics at Columbia University, Duke University, Princeton University, Brown University, Stanford University, and Harvard University, among others.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Manager, or call 315/386-7527.


SUNY Canton Faculty Member Presents “E-Fraction” Art Exhibition at SUNY Potsdam

Thursday, January 26th, 2012

E-FractionTwo artists with ties to SUNY Canton will be using lights and snow as their paint and canvas at SUNY Potsdam.

Assistant Professor Matthew J. Burnett, who teaches in the graphic and multimedia design (GMMD) program, and Scott Fuller, a GMMD advisory board member and an associate professor at St. Joseph’s College of Maine, are presenting a new outdoor display as part of their collaborative “E-Fraction” exhibition.

The two artists are currently displaying their paintings, photographs, sculptures, and mixed media installations at SUNY Potsdam’s Gibson Gallery and will begin molding sculptural forms in snow on Monday, Jan. 30. SUNY Potsdam will host an artists’ reception to highlight the indoor and outdoor portions of the show at 5 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 2, at the Gibson Gallery. Their outdoor work will be illuminated nightly through Feb. 7 in the SUNY Potsdam Academic Quad. Both displays are free and open to the public.

“We have plenty of winter, plenty of snow and plenty of ice in our region,” Burnett said. “I love the idea of celebrating what is unusual and beautiful about winter rather than complaining about it. There is so much complexity and power in the way ice and snow form and dominate our environment.”

Last year, Burnett and Fuller used large snow sculptures as a canvas for moving projected images of their work at a large-scale St. Lawrence University installation. Their efforts were highlighted in the March 13, 2011 Boston Globe article, “Rethinking Snow.”

The pair first collaborated in 2006 to create a kinetic sculpture exhibition in Mt. Desert Island, Maine, and then again in 2008 at Saranac Lake’s winter carnival to create a large-scale interactive illuminated spiral ice structure. In addition to the St. Lawrence University exhibition, they presented their light and snow creations last year in Long Lake using old black-and-white photographs projected on their snow creations. Both artists have shown their work regionally and internationally.

Fuller said the exhibitions take a massive amount of coordination, cooperation, and direction from both artists. He and Burnett will be relying on students and faculty members from SUNY Canton and SUNY Potsdam to help create the massive outdoor snow sculptures.

“Although we’ve worked collaboratively on large environmental exhibitions, we’ve only had one traditional indoor show together,” said Fuller. “We have lots of drawings, paintings and photographs that have been developed around these installations. Our gallery exhibition showcases over five years of working together.”

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Manager, or call 315/386-7527.

 

SUNY Canton Mourns the Passing of Richard W. Miller

Friday, January 6th, 2012

Richard MillerProminent patron’s legacy lives on through memories of his generosity, dedication, and charisma.

One of the most well-respected and generous SUNY Canton faculty members in College history has passed away.

Distinguished Professor Emeritus and longstanding Foundation Board Member Richard W. Miller died earlier this morning (Friday, January 6, 2012) at his West Main Street home in Canton. He was 93 years old.

“Dick’s passing saddens me greatly,” said SUNY Canton President Joseph L. Kennedy. “In addition to being one of the most respected individuals at the College, he and his wife Irene were personal friends of my family. I’m certain many would join me in saying that their lives have been enriched through his friendship and ongoing dedication to the College and greater Canton Community.”

Mr. Miller began teaching at SUNY Canton (then known as the Agricultural and Technical Institute) on June 7, 1946. He was a professor and Department Chairman of the Electrical Engineering Technology Department. In 1975, he was named an Outstanding Educator in America and the year following he won the State University of New York Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching.  In 1982, he received the SUNY Canton College Council’s Distinguished Faculty Award, and in 1990 the Council presented him with the Distinguished Citizen Award. He organized the SUNY Canton chapter of Tau Alpha Pi National Honor Society for Engineering Technology and was an esteemed advisor to the Alpha chapter of the Theta Gamma Fraternity. He retired in 1983.

Richard Miller

“Dick was one of the most influential faculty members to ever teach at SUNY Canton,” Kennedy said. “He assisted countless generations of successful graduates during his career. After he retired, he created scholarships to benefit incoming students. His legacy will live on across the campus.”

In 2003, Mr. Miller became the first donor in College history to make a million dollar donation to the SUNY Canton Foundation. His unrestricted donation led the college to name the then newly constructed campus center in his honor.

“I have had three loves of my life: The first, my wife Irene; the second, my family; and the third, this College,” Mr. Miller said at the Richard W. Miller Campus Center Dedication and Ribbon Cutting Ceremony.

He followed his donation with an additional $50,000 gift to the College in honor of his longstanding friendship with the Kennedys in 2010. Combined with his annual scholarship, Mr. Miller donated more than $1.6 million to SUNY Canton.

“Mr. Miller’s profound impact on SUNY Canton can be seen from anywhere on campus,” said Director of Alumni and Development Peggy S. Levato. “His generosity allowed us to make immeasurable progress at the College. He gave his time and heart to this college and for that, we will forever be indebted to him.”

Many alumni and current students knew Mr. Miller through his frequent involvement in campus following his retirement. In the past year he was a guest of honor at the College’s Kingston Fireplace Dedication, Holiday Luncheon, Scholarship Luncheon, and Alumni Weekend Celebration, among others. He attended his 65th consecutive commencement ceremony in 2011.

Update (Monday, Jan 9): Calling hours are 3 to 6 p.m. Thursday, January 12, at Lawrence Funeral Home, 21 Park St., Canton, with a service at 10:30 a.m. Friday, January 13 at the First Presbyterian Church, 17 Park St., and a reception to follow at the Richard W. Miller Campus Center at SUNY Canton. A Masonic service will be held on Thursday 5:45 p.m. Interment will be in Evergreen Cemetery in the spring. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests contributions in Richard’s name to the Canton Neighborhood Center, 5 West St., Canton Methodist Church Food Kitchen, or the Richard W. Miller Scholarship at SUNY Canton. Condolences may be sent to www.lawrencefuneralhome.org.

A complete obituary submitted my Mr. Miller’s family can be viewed at http://www.canton.edu/news/index.php/miller-obituary/

Please use the comments section below to share your memories and reflections.

Update (Saturday Jan. 7): SUNY Canton College Council Chair Ronald M. O’Neill’s Statement on the Passing of Richard W. Miller

“Yesterday, SUNY Canton lost a great friend.  Today, on behalf of the entire College Council, we mourn Dick’s passing and celebrate his life. Our thoughts and prayers go out to his family and many friends.”

“Dick was truly one of a kind.  His contributions to SUNY Canton and the community cannot be measured in mere dollars.  Teacher, mentor, friend, supporter, Dick was all these and much more. For more than six decades, Dick gave of his time, energy and money to ensuring SUNY Canton would continue to grow and flourish.”

“His dedication and fierce loyalty set a shining example for our campus and the greater North Country.  While we will miss his presence at events, and his wise counsel and wit, we know that his legacy at SUNY Canton is enduring, which is just the way he planned it.”

Two SUNY Canton Professors Earn Recognition for Research

Thursday, November 10th, 2011

Investors today are more likely to put their money and trust in companies that demonstrate corporate social responsibility, according to two SUNY Canton professors.

A research paper written by Associate Professor of Criminal Justice Brian K. Harte, Ph.D., and Assistant Professor of Finance Umesh Kumar was recently awarded “Southern Journal of Business and Economics Best Paper in Economics.” Their paper titled, “Corporate Social Responsibility and Investor Response in the Post-SOX Era.” was recognized at the Academy of Business Research Fall International Conference in Atlantic City, N.J., in September.

Brian Harte and Umesh Kumar

The paper examines Corporate Socially Responsible (CSR) behavior within convicted Fortune 500 companies and how it has become a cornerstone in corporate America, particularly in the post Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) Act era. CSR policy encourages companies to take responsibility for their actions and have a positive impact on the environment, consumers, employees, communities, stakeholders and beyond.

 “Corporate Social Responsibility became increasingly important for investors after companies such as Enron came under fire,” Harte said. “The SOX Act was enacted to try and create transparency for investors and curb unethical corporate behavior by providing severe punishments for both criminal offenders and the firms they represent. Before it was enacted, responsibility did not fall on single individuals within companies, but rather on the Boards within those companies. Now, many CEOs and CFOs have taken on the individual responsibilities if something goes wrong so there is a tangible person to assign blame to if need be.”

“Our research shows that companies who demonstrate social responsibility are being rewarded by investors,” Kumar noted. “Convicted firms adopting high levels of CSR behavior, garner more positive investor response in the Post-Sox era.”

The paper has not been published in its entirety yet.

The Academy of Business Research is an international society of scholars and practitioners who exchange ideas and collaborate in a conference setting.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Manager, or call 315/386-7527.

 

Canton’s Dan Fay Wins SUNY Chancellor’s Top Faculty Award

Monday, May 16th, 2011

SUNY Canton Accounting Professor and 2011 Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Faculty Service recipient Daniel G. Fay at the College's recent Honors Convocation celebration.

A faculty member with more than four decades of service to SUNY Canton and numerous ties to the Town and Village of Canton will receive one of the highest recognitions possible from the State University of New York.

Accounting Professor Daniel G. Fay will be recognized as a recipient of Chancellor Nancy L. Zimpher’s Award for Excellence in Faculty Service at SUNY Canton’s 103rd Commencement Ceremony to be held 10:30 a.m. Saturday, May 21, in the College’s brand-new athletic center, nicknamed Roos House.

“Professor Fay has an indelible love for accounting and business education,” SUNY Canton President Joseph L. Kennedy said. “Within the SUNY Canton Community, he’s embraced and helped shape our College as it stands today, and his commitment will be recognized for years to come. I’m proud SUNY has chosen to bestow this award for his unwavering support and service to our College.”

As a faculty member, Fay has influenced generations of students who have become among the most prominent alumni at the College. He is well known and highly regarded as an outstanding educator and community leader. According to letters of support from faculty members and students, he strives to provide every opportunity to increase scholarship, diversity and positive relationships. His unwavering dedication has been described as “amazing” and “unsurpassed.”

“Professor Fay offers a high level of excellence in his professional knowledge and in the high standards he maintains in his teaching,” said Assistant Professor of Finance Umesh Kumar, Fay’s professional colleague. “He is simply an outstanding individual. I especially appreciate his ability to be a caring, proactive and effective educator.”

Fay has been an active board member of the SUNY Canton College Foundation for more than 20 years. He has helped create student scholarships through the Eileen and George Fay Endowment and the Linda Fay Endowment. Additionally, he’s helped create the SUNY Canton Investment Club, which analyzes and recommends investments for the College Foundation.

“We can learn a lot from Dan beyond his keen business sense and accounting abilities,” said Julie A. Parkman, Associate Director for Advancement. “He teaches his students and peers alike that they can accomplish anything by working hard, being confident and courteous, while remembering to help others.”

Fay is a Town of Canton Councilman, an area business owner, and an active member of the Knights of Columbus. He’s served as a St. Lawrence County Legislator and a member of the Canton Highway, Audit, and Recreation Committees.

Sports have played a large role in his life. Included in Fay’s athletic accomplishments are his intercollegiate wrestling career and his participation on the U.S. Bobsled team during the 1971 Winter Games. He has coached lacrosse for second-grade students and was an assistant varsity lacrosse coach at Canton’s Hugh C. Williams High School for numerous years. His excellent record has led him to be inducted into Clarkson University’s Hall of Fame and Massena Central High School’s Hall of Fame. He was also inducted into the Hugh C. Williams High School Hall of Fame as an outstanding supporter of local athletics.

After the recent retirement of Biology Professor Michael M. Peebles, Fay became the senior-most faculty member at the College. Peebles passed on his duties to Fay at SUNY Canton’s Honors Convocation, which included carrying the College’s ceremonial mace at formal events. Fay will lead the procession of faculty for the first time at this year’s Commencement – the very same day he will receive public recognition for this prestigious award.

Dan is married to SUNY Canton Distinguished Professor Emeritus Linda L. Fay, who was recognized last year when the College chose to name Honors Convocation in her honor. They have three children, Mrs. Steven (Kelley) Glasgow, Edward, and John, and two grandchildren, Garret and Paige.

He is also closely associated with Anywar Ricky Richard, a former childhood soldier and the founder of Friends of Orphans, an organization that supports former child soldiers in Uganda, Africa. The Fays brought Richard to SUNY Canton as a guest speaker. His speech is widely remembered as one of the most poignant and informative lectures at the College.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.


Assistant Professor of Accounting Receives Award from SUNY Canton Students

Thursday, May 12th, 2011

Peggy JenkinsAn assistant professor of accounting who encourages student volunteerism will be receiving the top student-given award at SUNY Canton.

Peggy J. Jenkins will be recognized with SUNY Canton’s Northstar Award at the College’s 103rd Commencement Ceremony, to be held at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, May 21, in the College’s new athletic center, nicknamed Roos House.

Jenkins annually orchestrates the IRS-sponsored Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program at the College, which helps low- to moderate-income individuals and families prepare their taxes. Through her involvement, student participation in the program has tripled, and the group prepared more than 150 returns for the 2010 tax period.

“Beyond providing a valuable service to individuals who might not be able to pay to have their taxes prepared, the VITA program provides students with hands-on real-world experience,” said Linda A. Heilman, Dean of the College’s School of Business and Liberal Arts.

Among the student recommendations for the Northstar Award were numerous mentions of Jenkin’s ability to provide exceptional real-world examples of accounting policies and procedures. One student said that Jenkins consistently goes above and beyond to help all of her students achieve their full potential.

“Whenever I bring up her name or her unique teaching style to a fellow student, they agree with my opinion that Mrs. Jenkins is one of the most remarkable faculty members at the College,” wrote a student in a letter of recommendation for the award. “She is very deserving of this award.”

SUNY Canton Assistant Professor and 2011 Northstar Award Recipient Peggy J. Jenkins teaching an accounting class.

Eight students have recognized her outstanding involvement and presented her with awards through the Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society.

Jenkins is a Certified Public Accountant in Pennsylvania who received her Master of Business Administration from Penn State University, and her Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from Bridgewater College in Virginia. In addition to her courses at SUNY Canton, she’s lectured internationally at the University of Wales, Bangor, U.K.

Jenkins lives in Canton with her family. She has a son Colin, and a daughter Lucy.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.


SUNY Canton Artist Featured in The Boston Globe

Tuesday, March 15th, 2011

SUNY Canton assistant professor capitalized on the abundance of snow in Upstate New York as a medium for his latest artwork.

Mathew J. Burnett, an assistant professor in SUNY Canton’s humanities department who teaches in the graphic and multimedia design program, was recently mentioned in the Boston Globe for his large-scale snow sculpture installation “E-Luminations.” Burnett and fellow artist Scott Fuller, assistant professor of fine art at Saint Joseph’s College of Maine, transformed St. Lawrence University’s quad into a large-scale public art gallery using snow and several customized slide projectors in February.

“We’re used to seeing small-scale bursts of creativity in the snowmen and forts that people craft in parks and backyards,” wrote Courtney Humphries for The Boston Globe article entitled Rethinking Snow. “Yet when faced with so much excess, why not apply those impulses on a grander scale? Around the world, innovative artists, architects, and planners in cold climates have used snow as a design material, transforming it into giant pieces of public art, architecture, and landscaping.”

Enlisting the help of SUNY Canton and St. Lawrence students, Burnett and Fuller carved giant snowballs to use as canvases for projections of their abstracted paintings. Each night for a week, they used LCD and slide projectors to light up the 8-foot orbs with a colorful rotating selection of artwork.

“In our previous installation, we used old local photographs,” Burnett said. “At St. Lawrence we used images and videos of ice, water, and fire, and abstract paintings we made to enhance the visual effect of the sculptures.”

St. Lawrence University Photographer Tara Freeman captured one of the most telling images of the installation within its overall environment. It was published on the cover of the Spring 2011 St. Lawrence University Magazine and reproduced with permission for this release.

To read The Boston Globe article, visit: http://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/ideas/articles/2011/03/13/rethinking_snow/

 

Assistant Professor Awarded for Corporate Crime Research

Friday, January 7th, 2011

Brian HarteBusinesses that are engaged with the community and are focused on sustainability may be less likely to be involved in white-collar crime, according to a SUNY Canton assistant professor’s research.

Brian K. Harte, who teaches criminal justice, criminal investigation, and business courses at the College, will be receiving the Overall Best Applied Paper Award from the International Academy of Management and Business (IAMB) for his studies on the impact of federal regulations on corporate-level crime.

He said his topic of study was timely because the general public has shown outrage against unscrupulous companies, and demanded greater transparency of corporate behaviors.

“The lack of strong corporate ethics and fiscally responsible behaviors within corporations over the last decade has created the need for more external governmental controls,” Harte said. “I analyzed the behaviors and environments of Fortune 500 Companies to statistically find correlation between practices and conviction.”

Using statistical analysis, Harte was able to lend support to his hypothesis that businesses with greater access to resources are less likely to engage in corporate criminal activity. Additionally, businesses with a high level of corporate social responsibility are also less likely to be charged with corporate business felonies. “Examples of corporate social responsibility are far-ranging, and can include green initiatives, community involvement, and corporate stewardship,” he said.

He studied notable companies that had been investigated for fraudulent activities, including Enron, Worldcom, and Healthsouth.

“There were substantial differences in the corporate social responsibility reports of companies that had been indicted and those that hadn’t,” Harte said. “It supports the theory that businesses with a commitment to social responsibility are more apt to operate within the law.”

Financial measures and overall company size were not a clear indicator of illegal corporate activity, but instability, and market position may influence decisions to break business laws. Prior to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, which was developed in reaction to several high-profile corporate and accounting scandals, it was commonly believed that larger companies were more likely to engage in illegal corporate behavior. Harte found after the regulatory measures were passed, smaller companies were more likely to be convicted of crimes. “One possible explanation is larger firms have more resources, and have the ability to avoid detection of illegal acts more than smaller, financially transparent firms,” he said.

Another area of Harte’s research evaluates the effectiveness of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, sometimes referred to as Public Company Accounting Reform and Investor Protection Act. He’s trying to determine what, if any impact the act had – or if it is just business as usual in corporate America.

“The bottom line impacts all corporate decisions and the end goal is to generate revenue,” he said. “More and more I’m finding that businesses that can do that while giving back to their communities or support sustainable growth are the ones that operate within ethical boundaries. If a firm can do both then it is really a win-win scenario.”

Harte will receive his award and present his research Jan. 18 at a ceremony in Orlando, Fla., at an international conference of academic scholars from 20 countries. The IAMB is a professional association dedicated to advancing the research, teaching and practice of management and business worldwide through both academic publications and conferences.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.


SUNY Canton Artist Exhibits at Saranac Lake Gallery

Thursday, July 8th, 2010

A SUNY Canton Faculty Member’s new work blends layers of natural chaos with artistic design.

Matthew J. Burnett, an Assistant Professor in the College’s graphic and multimedia design program, is currently displaying his most recent collaborative painting project “Clusterphobic” through July 26, at the 7444 Gallery in Saranac Lake.

SUNY Canton Assistant Professor Matthew J. Burnett puts the finishing touches on a one of his collaborative paintings currently on display in the 7444 Gallery in Saranac Lake.

His most recent work is about layers. Burnett and his colleague Scott Fuller have created a series of large-scale mixed media panel paintings inspired by the layering of beautiful or compelling patterns he’s observed during time spent in the Adirondacks. Fuller is department chair of the Visual Arts program at St. Joseph’s College in Maine and is an advisory committee member for SUNY Canton’s GMMD program.

“We are constantly trying new ways to push the mediums we work with to new levels,” Burnett said. “This body of work lends itself to innovation by its very nature. A natural occurring phenomenon like a pile of sticks, or the textures of a tree, can influence one of these pieces.”

Fuller prepares the base layer by silk-screening repeating patterns to a large panel. On a separate panel, Burnett paints his own compositions and physically cuts away areas to create negative space. The two panels are attached together to create an overall unified composition of the two artists’ work.

“We do not make matter, we collect and reassemble it,” Burnett said in a description of the show. “We do not materialize new relationships, we enable new expressions of what we have experienced.”

Also featured at the 7444 gallery is a community minded effort by Burnett and gallery director Todd Smith. The pair refurbished a vintage cigarette machine to dispense small pieces of artwork created by more than 20 regional artists. Each piece costs $1. The machine, loosely dubbed “Smokin’ Art,” is part of the burgeoning Saranac Lake Arts scene, and will be featured at various public locations during the “Third Thursday” celebrations.  “Saranac Lake is becoming a hub of contemporary and traditional artists, and I’m proud to be a part of it,” Burnett said.

One of the small works of art dispensed by a refurbished cigarette vending machine at the 7444 Gallery where Burnett is displaying.

For more about the artists, visit www.mattburnettpaintings.com and http://scottfullerart.com.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.


SUNY Canton Honors Convocation Named for Varick A. Chittenden

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2008

Event honoring students’ academic success heralds Emeritus Professor

Varick Chittenden

TRADITIONALLY MOTIVATED – Professor Emeritus Varick A. Chittenden stands in the Traditional Arts in Upstate New York Folklore Store. The 2008 SUNY Canton Honors Convocation was named in honor of Chittenden’s his contributions to education and to his continuing celebration of the North Country way of life.

The 2008 SUNY Canton Honors Convocation has been named in honor of Professor Emeritus Varick A. Chittenden, announced SUNY Canton President Joseph L. Kennedy.

“Varick is extremely dedicated to the culture of the North Country,” said Kennedy. “During his time at the College, he created courses specifically designed to inform students about the traditions specific to this area.”

Chittenden was awarded emeritus status in 2001 after 32 years at SUNY Canton. He developed popular courses in American folklore and Images of Rural American Life, established the folk life festival on campus, served as Humanities department chair, and on the Canton College Foundation Board. He received the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching in 1974 and the SUNY Canton Distinguished Faculty Award in 1991.

“Varick symbolizes the meaning of education and has never stopped teaching.” Kennedy said. “He has continued his dedication and his instruction through his involvement with Traditional Arts in Upstate New York (TAUNY) and is ensuring that a wide audience embraces the heritage and artistic merit of the North Country.”

In 1986, Chittenden organized TAUNY, a not-for-profit membership folk arts organization dedicated to identifying, recording, conserving and presenting examples of traditions, customs, and artistic expressions of the local culture. In 2000, TAUNY received the prestigious New York State Governor’s Arts Award during a gala awards ceremony at the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art for their commitment to preserving the traditions of the communities of northern New York. As the founder and until recently Executive Director of TAUNY, he continues to celebrate folk artists and folk traditions through his North Country Heritage Awards which are presented annually to deserving individuals or community groups that carry on local traditions such as music, storytelling, crafts and community events. TAUNY recently purchased a former retail store in Canton’s historic district for its future home and Varick has been appointed Heritage Center Project Director to lead the organization in creating a regional interpretive center of folklife and local culture.

Chittenden was a longtime member and president of the board of trustees for the St. Lawrence County Historical Association, a founding member and past chairman of the board of Grasse River Heritage, and is the current president of the Canton Rotary Club.

The Honors Convocation celebration includes:

  • Folklore in the North Country: A Reading Celebration, featuring readings from Varick Chittenden’s New York Folklore Society Column and from humanities faculty members at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 29 in the Richard W. Miller Campus Center Kingston Theater. This event is free and open to the public.
  • The Varick A. Chittenden Honors Convocation Ceremony honoring the outstanding academic achievement of SUNY Canton students at 4:15 p.m. Wednesday, April 30, in the Richard W. Miller Campus Center Intramural Gym. This event is free and open to the public, with a special invitation presented to the families and friends of award recipients.
  • An invitation only reception will conclude the ceremonies on Friday, May 2. Graduating award recipients are asked to bring a faculty member who has influenced their academic success. For more information contact the SUNY Canton Provost’s Office at 386-7202 or email livernoi@ canton.edu.

SUNY Canton offers a wide variety of career-driven bachelor’s, associate, and certificate programs, as well as three master’s degrees in conjunction with SUNYIT, Utica. Most of SUNY Canton’s new four-year programs are designed so students can take them on-campus, online, or both. SUNY Canton OnLine features more than 65 courses online each semester. The college’s athletic teams have joined the NAIA’s Sunrise Conference, enabling students to compete in their respective sports for four years.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.