Archive for the ‘Faculty’ Category

Assistant Professor of Accounting Receives Award from SUNY Canton Students

Thursday, May 12th, 2011

Peggy JenkinsAn assistant professor of accounting who encourages student volunteerism will be receiving the top student-given award at SUNY Canton.

Peggy J. Jenkins will be recognized with SUNY Canton’s Northstar Award at the College’s 103rd Commencement Ceremony, to be held at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, May 21, in the College’s new athletic center, nicknamed Roos House.

Jenkins annually orchestrates the IRS-sponsored Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program at the College, which helps low- to moderate-income individuals and families prepare their taxes. Through her involvement, student participation in the program has tripled, and the group prepared more than 150 returns for the 2010 tax period.

“Beyond providing a valuable service to individuals who might not be able to pay to have their taxes prepared, the VITA program provides students with hands-on real-world experience,” said Linda A. Heilman, Dean of the College’s School of Business and Liberal Arts.

Among the student recommendations for the Northstar Award were numerous mentions of Jenkin’s ability to provide exceptional real-world examples of accounting policies and procedures. One student said that Jenkins consistently goes above and beyond to help all of her students achieve their full potential.

“Whenever I bring up her name or her unique teaching style to a fellow student, they agree with my opinion that Mrs. Jenkins is one of the most remarkable faculty members at the College,” wrote a student in a letter of recommendation for the award. “She is very deserving of this award.”

SUNY Canton Assistant Professor and 2011 Northstar Award Recipient Peggy J. Jenkins teaching an accounting class.

Eight students have recognized her outstanding involvement and presented her with awards through the Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society.

Jenkins is a Certified Public Accountant in Pennsylvania who received her Master of Business Administration from Penn State University, and her Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from Bridgewater College in Virginia. In addition to her courses at SUNY Canton, she’s lectured internationally at the University of Wales, Bangor, U.K.

Jenkins lives in Canton with her family. She has a son Colin, and a daughter Lucy.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.


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SUNY Canton Artist Featured in The Boston Globe

Tuesday, March 15th, 2011

SUNY Canton assistant professor capitalized on the abundance of snow in Upstate New York as a medium for his latest artwork.

Mathew J. Burnett, an assistant professor in SUNY Canton’s humanities department who teaches in the graphic and multimedia design program, was recently mentioned in the Boston Globe for his large-scale snow sculpture installation “E-Luminations.” Burnett and fellow artist Scott Fuller, assistant professor of fine art at Saint Joseph’s College of Maine, transformed St. Lawrence University’s quad into a large-scale public art gallery using snow and several customized slide projectors in February.

“We’re used to seeing small-scale bursts of creativity in the snowmen and forts that people craft in parks and backyards,” wrote Courtney Humphries for The Boston Globe article entitled Rethinking Snow. “Yet when faced with so much excess, why not apply those impulses on a grander scale? Around the world, innovative artists, architects, and planners in cold climates have used snow as a design material, transforming it into giant pieces of public art, architecture, and landscaping.”

Enlisting the help of SUNY Canton and St. Lawrence students, Burnett and Fuller carved giant snowballs to use as canvases for projections of their abstracted paintings. Each night for a week, they used LCD and slide projectors to light up the 8-foot orbs with a colorful rotating selection of artwork.

“In our previous installation, we used old local photographs,” Burnett said. “At St. Lawrence we used images and videos of ice, water, and fire, and abstract paintings we made to enhance the visual effect of the sculptures.”

St. Lawrence University Photographer Tara Freeman captured one of the most telling images of the installation within its overall environment. It was published on the cover of the Spring 2011 St. Lawrence University Magazine and reproduced with permission for this release.

To read The Boston Globe article, visit: http://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/ideas/articles/2011/03/13/rethinking_snow/

 

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Assistant Professor Awarded for Corporate Crime Research

Friday, January 7th, 2011

Brian HarteBusinesses that are engaged with the community and are focused on sustainability may be less likely to be involved in white-collar crime, according to a SUNY Canton assistant professor’s research.

Brian K. Harte, who teaches criminal justice, criminal investigation, and business courses at the College, will be receiving the Overall Best Applied Paper Award from the International Academy of Management and Business (IAMB) for his studies on the impact of federal regulations on corporate-level crime.

He said his topic of study was timely because the general public has shown outrage against unscrupulous companies, and demanded greater transparency of corporate behaviors.

“The lack of strong corporate ethics and fiscally responsible behaviors within corporations over the last decade has created the need for more external governmental controls,” Harte said. “I analyzed the behaviors and environments of Fortune 500 Companies to statistically find correlation between practices and conviction.”

Using statistical analysis, Harte was able to lend support to his hypothesis that businesses with greater access to resources are less likely to engage in corporate criminal activity. Additionally, businesses with a high level of corporate social responsibility are also less likely to be charged with corporate business felonies. “Examples of corporate social responsibility are far-ranging, and can include green initiatives, community involvement, and corporate stewardship,” he said.

He studied notable companies that had been investigated for fraudulent activities, including Enron, Worldcom, and Healthsouth.

“There were substantial differences in the corporate social responsibility reports of companies that had been indicted and those that hadn’t,” Harte said. “It supports the theory that businesses with a commitment to social responsibility are more apt to operate within the law.”

Financial measures and overall company size were not a clear indicator of illegal corporate activity, but instability, and market position may influence decisions to break business laws. Prior to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, which was developed in reaction to several high-profile corporate and accounting scandals, it was commonly believed that larger companies were more likely to engage in illegal corporate behavior. Harte found after the regulatory measures were passed, smaller companies were more likely to be convicted of crimes. “One possible explanation is larger firms have more resources, and have the ability to avoid detection of illegal acts more than smaller, financially transparent firms,” he said.

Another area of Harte’s research evaluates the effectiveness of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, sometimes referred to as Public Company Accounting Reform and Investor Protection Act. He’s trying to determine what, if any impact the act had – or if it is just business as usual in corporate America.

“The bottom line impacts all corporate decisions and the end goal is to generate revenue,” he said. “More and more I’m finding that businesses that can do that while giving back to their communities or support sustainable growth are the ones that operate within ethical boundaries. If a firm can do both then it is really a win-win scenario.”

Harte will receive his award and present his research Jan. 18 at a ceremony in Orlando, Fla., at an international conference of academic scholars from 20 countries. The IAMB is a professional association dedicated to advancing the research, teaching and practice of management and business worldwide through both academic publications and conferences.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.


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SUNY Canton Artist Exhibits at Saranac Lake Gallery

Thursday, July 8th, 2010

A SUNY Canton Faculty Member’s new work blends layers of natural chaos with artistic design.

Matthew J. Burnett, an Assistant Professor in the College’s graphic and multimedia design program, is currently displaying his most recent collaborative painting project “Clusterphobic” through July 26, at the 7444 Gallery in Saranac Lake.

SUNY Canton Assistant Professor Matthew J. Burnett puts the finishing touches on a one of his collaborative paintings currently on display in the 7444 Gallery in Saranac Lake.

His most recent work is about layers. Burnett and his colleague Scott Fuller have created a series of large-scale mixed media panel paintings inspired by the layering of beautiful or compelling patterns he’s observed during time spent in the Adirondacks. Fuller is department chair of the Visual Arts program at St. Joseph’s College in Maine and is an advisory committee member for SUNY Canton’s GMMD program.

“We are constantly trying new ways to push the mediums we work with to new levels,” Burnett said. “This body of work lends itself to innovation by its very nature. A natural occurring phenomenon like a pile of sticks, or the textures of a tree, can influence one of these pieces.”

Fuller prepares the base layer by silk-screening repeating patterns to a large panel. On a separate panel, Burnett paints his own compositions and physically cuts away areas to create negative space. The two panels are attached together to create an overall unified composition of the two artists’ work.

“We do not make matter, we collect and reassemble it,” Burnett said in a description of the show. “We do not materialize new relationships, we enable new expressions of what we have experienced.”

Also featured at the 7444 gallery is a community minded effort by Burnett and gallery director Todd Smith. The pair refurbished a vintage cigarette machine to dispense small pieces of artwork created by more than 20 regional artists. Each piece costs $1. The machine, loosely dubbed “Smokin’ Art,” is part of the burgeoning Saranac Lake Arts scene, and will be featured at various public locations during the “Third Thursday” celebrations.  “Saranac Lake is becoming a hub of contemporary and traditional artists, and I’m proud to be a part of it,” Burnett said.

One of the small works of art dispensed by a refurbished cigarette vending machine at the 7444 Gallery where Burnett is displaying.

For more about the artists, visit www.mattburnettpaintings.com and http://scottfullerart.com.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.


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SUNY Canton Honors Convocation Named for Varick A. Chittenden

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2008

Event honoring students’ academic success heralds Emeritus Professor

Varick Chittenden

TRADITIONALLY MOTIVATED – Professor Emeritus Varick A. Chittenden stands in the Traditional Arts in Upstate New York Folklore Store. The 2008 SUNY Canton Honors Convocation was named in honor of Chittenden’s his contributions to education and to his continuing celebration of the North Country way of life.

The 2008 SUNY Canton Honors Convocation has been named in honor of Professor Emeritus Varick A. Chittenden, announced SUNY Canton President Joseph L. Kennedy.

“Varick is extremely dedicated to the culture of the North Country,” said Kennedy. “During his time at the College, he created courses specifically designed to inform students about the traditions specific to this area.”

Chittenden was awarded emeritus status in 2001 after 32 years at SUNY Canton. He developed popular courses in American folklore and Images of Rural American Life, established the folk life festival on campus, served as Humanities department chair, and on the Canton College Foundation Board. He received the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching in 1974 and the SUNY Canton Distinguished Faculty Award in 1991.

“Varick symbolizes the meaning of education and has never stopped teaching.” Kennedy said. “He has continued his dedication and his instruction through his involvement with Traditional Arts in Upstate New York (TAUNY) and is ensuring that a wide audience embraces the heritage and artistic merit of the North Country.”

In 1986, Chittenden organized TAUNY, a not-for-profit membership folk arts organization dedicated to identifying, recording, conserving and presenting examples of traditions, customs, and artistic expressions of the local culture. In 2000, TAUNY received the prestigious New York State Governor’s Arts Award during a gala awards ceremony at the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art for their commitment to preserving the traditions of the communities of northern New York. As the founder and until recently Executive Director of TAUNY, he continues to celebrate folk artists and folk traditions through his North Country Heritage Awards which are presented annually to deserving individuals or community groups that carry on local traditions such as music, storytelling, crafts and community events. TAUNY recently purchased a former retail store in Canton’s historic district for its future home and Varick has been appointed Heritage Center Project Director to lead the organization in creating a regional interpretive center of folklife and local culture.

Chittenden was a longtime member and president of the board of trustees for the St. Lawrence County Historical Association, a founding member and past chairman of the board of Grasse River Heritage, and is the current president of the Canton Rotary Club.

The Honors Convocation celebration includes:

  • Folklore in the North Country: A Reading Celebration, featuring readings from Varick Chittenden’s New York Folklore Society Column and from humanities faculty members at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 29 in the Richard W. Miller Campus Center Kingston Theater. This event is free and open to the public.
  • The Varick A. Chittenden Honors Convocation Ceremony honoring the outstanding academic achievement of SUNY Canton students at 4:15 p.m. Wednesday, April 30, in the Richard W. Miller Campus Center Intramural Gym. This event is free and open to the public, with a special invitation presented to the families and friends of award recipients.
  • An invitation only reception will conclude the ceremonies on Friday, May 2. Graduating award recipients are asked to bring a faculty member who has influenced their academic success. For more information contact the SUNY Canton Provost’s Office at 386-7202 or email livernoi@ canton.edu.

SUNY Canton offers a wide variety of career-driven bachelor’s, associate, and certificate programs, as well as three master’s degrees in conjunction with SUNYIT, Utica. Most of SUNY Canton’s new four-year programs are designed so students can take them on-campus, online, or both. SUNY Canton OnLine features more than 65 courses online each semester. The college’s athletic teams have joined the NAIA’s Sunrise Conference, enabling students to compete in their respective sports for four years.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.

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SUNY Canton Foundation Campaigns to Honor Harry King

Monday, April 7th, 2008

Harry KingThe SUNY Canton Foundation has revealed plans to raise $100,000 to honor Professor Emeritus Harry E. King, one of the most venerable and dedicated professors in the college’s history.

“We’d like to name the Air Conditioning Engineering Technology Laboratory in Harry’s honor,” said SUNY Canton President Joseph L. Kennedy. “In order to secure that right, we will be asking for donations from Alumni and organizations who know of King’s dedication and commitment to the college and community.”

King, who graduated in 1940, created the Air Conditioning Engineering Technology program in 1946 in the corner of an old barn with only a few tools. He oversaw the program until he retired in 1983. Now, the high-tech SUNY Canton lab has computers utilizing the latest design software and numerous air-handling units for students to study.

“Since its beginning, the program has continued to evolve and meet the increasingly complicated demands and needs of our society,” noted Arthur G. Hurlbut, Emeritus Dean of the Canino School of Engineering Technology. “Harry influenced my life and the lives of countless other SUNY Canton graduates.”

King’s foresight has produced countless successful graduates. Nearly 100 percent of Air Conditioning Engineering Technology alumni secure successful careers immediately following graduation.

King has been decorated with Distinguished Faculty and Distinguished Alumni awards and is a former Alumni Association president. Both a SUNY Canton Foundation scholarship and an American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers scholarship have been named in his honor.

“There are a select number of professors whose names echo in the history of SUNY Canton,” said David M. Gerlach, Vice President for Advancement. “Harry’s is high up on that list. I encourage anyone who has been influenced by Harry and his work to consider contributing to this namesake opportunity.”

King lives on Pleasant Street in Canton with his wife, Wilda. They have three daughters, JoAnne Danehy, Barbara King, and Martha MacArthur (class of 1974 and 1978).

The SUNY Canton Foundation began this campaign in February and is looking for donations of any size to reach the $100,000 goal. For more information, contact Development Associate Jeremiah J. Ayrassian at 386-7038, or by email at ayrassianj@canton.edu.

SUNY Canton offers a wide variety of career-driven bachelor’s, associate, and certificate programs, as well as three master’s degrees in conjunction with SUNYIT, Utica. Most of SUNY Canton’s new four-year programs are designed so students can take them on-campus, online, or both. SUNY Canton OnLine features more than 65 courses online each semester. The college’s athletic teams have joined the NAIA’s Sunrise Conference, enabling students to compete in their respective sports for four years.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.


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SUNY Canton Assistant Prof Selected for California Training

Wednesday, February 20th, 2008
Haas Training

Mechanical Engineering Technology Assistant Professor Daniel Miller works with Massena Central School Teacher Suzanne Creurer on one of the college’s Haas CNC Machines. Miller will soon be attending a Haas Training session in Oxnard, Calif.

Haas Automation Inc. has selected SUNY Canton Mechanical Engineering Technology Assistant Professor Daniel J. Miller out of hundreds of applicants to attend a two-day training session in Oxnard, Calif.

Miller will attend the premier Computer Numerical Controlled (CNC) machine tool manufacturer’s first educational conference to learn first hand how the company builds their high-tech products. Haas will be picking up most of Miller’s expenses for his trip to their state-of-the-art manufacturing facility.

“I’ve wanted to visit their facility for some time,” Miller said. “There are tremendous career opportunities for graduates of the Mechanical Engineering Technology program with Haas. We’re in a really good position to provide well trained industry-ready professionals.”

Miller will join 20 other educators from across the nation to meet with the company’s general managers and industry-leading officials. They all have the chance to exchange ideas and compare practices. “It’s very exciting to see what other people are doing in their programs and to bring that knowledge back to the classroom,” Miller said.

SUNY Canton currently has 13 Haas CNC machines utilized daily by students in the Mechanical Engineering Technology curriculum. Companies and government organizations using Haas products include NASA, Caterpillar, Harley Davidson, Ford, Owens Corning, and Alcoa.

The company sold 13,000 machines last year and plans to sell 15,000 this year, positioning them as the largest American manufacturer of precision CNC machines. Haas also sponsors two NASCAR cars.

SUNY Canton offers a wide variety of career-driven bachelor’s, associate, and certificate programs, as well as three master’s degrees in conjunction with SUNYIT, Utica. Most of SUNY Canton’s new four-year programs are designed so students can take them on-campus, online, or both. SUNY Canton OnLine features more than 65 courses online each semester. The college’s athletic teams have joined the NAIA’s Sunrise Conference, enabling students to compete in their respective sports for four years.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.

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SUNY Canton Part of Focus the Nation Event

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2008

Several SUNY Canton professors will be presenting Teach-Ins to help develop a better understanding of the problems and solutions for climate change, as part of the national call-to-action “Focus the Nation.”

More than 1,300 colleges from across the country, including all four Associated Colleges of the North Country (SUNY Canton, Clarkson University, SUNY Potsdam, and St. Lawrence University), will be participating in this event.

Teach-ins developed in the 1960s as a form of protest. At SUNY Canton, they will be used as a way to broaden points of view and develop solutions to rising environmental problems.

The complete schedule of “Focus the Nation” events is as follows:

  • To begin the three-day event, there will be a screening of the Focus the Nation Webcast featuring Actor Edward Norton at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 30, in the Kingston Theater.
  • The first teach-in, entitled “Global Warming: Habitat Destruction and Technological Solutions,” will be held from 3 to 5 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 31, in Nevaldine North Lecture Room 102. Veterinary Services Management Program Director Dr. Sophia C. Theodore, Alternative and Renewable Energy Systems Program Director Michael Newtown and Assistant Professor Matthew Bullwinkle will be presenting and moderating this event.
  • The second teach-in, “Climate Change: Psychology and Morals,” will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 1, in Payson Lecture Hall Room 219. This teach-in will be presented and moderated by Assistant Professor of Psychology Joan Poulsen and Assistant Professor of Humanities Matthew Burnett.
  • Focus the Nation will culminate with a community forum on Friday, February 1, from 7 to 10 p.m. in Gulick Theatre at St. Lawrence University. The community forum will bring together the participants of the Teach-Ins, to share reports on discussions, pose questions, and propose possible actions.

All events are free and open to the public.

Detailed schedules are also available on each of the participating colleges’ websites.

SUNY Canton offers a wide variety of career-driven bachelor’s, associate, and certificate programs, as well as three master’s degrees in conjunction with SUNYIT, Utica. Most of SUNY Canton’s new four-year programs are designed so students can take them on-campus, online, or both. SUNY Canton OnLine features more than 65 courses online each semester. The college’s athletic teams have joined the NAIA’s Sunrise Conference, enabling students to compete in their respective sports for four years.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.

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SUNY Canton Welcomes 13 New Faculty Members

Tuesday, August 28th, 2007

SUNY Canton Welcomes 13 New Faculty Members SUNY Canton President Joseph L. Kennedy welcomed 13 new faculty members to the college during his annual state-of-the-campus address.

NEW FACULTY – Pictured are some of SUNY Canton's new faculty members beginning this semester (l to r) Ali Zaidi, Assistant Professor of Spanish, Lawretta Ononye, Assistant Professor of Physics, Patrick LaPierre, American History Instructor, Brenda Armstrong, Assistant Professor of Nursing, Susan Willette, Dental Hygiene Instructor, Christa Kelson, Accounting Instructor, Ronald Tavernier, Biology Instructor, Patricia Shinn, Assistant Professor of Nursing, Robert Boak, Building Construction Instructor, Rashid Aidun, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering.

“Each new employee will help the college expand and grow,” Kennedy said. “I am looking forward to working with all of the faculty and staff at the college to create another year of evolution.”

Among the new faculty members are:

  • Rashid Aidun joined SUNY Canton as an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. He holds a doctorate from Clarkson University in Experimental Solid State Physics.
  • Brenda Armstrong joined the college as an Assistant Professor of Nursing. She earned her master’s degree in Nursing from Murray State University in Kentucky.
  • Robert Boak joined SUNY Canton as a Building Construction Instructor. He is a 1998 SUNY Canton alumnus.
  • Christa Kelson joined the college as an Accounting Instructor. She earned her Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.
  • Patrick LaPierre joins the college as an American History Instructor. He earned his master’s degree in History from Concordia University in Montreal.
  • Jiayvan “Jerry” Lin joined the college as an assistant professor of Mathematics. He holds a doctorate in Mathematics from the University of California Santa Barbara.
  • Lawretta Ononye joined the college as an Assistant Professor of Physics. She earned her Ph.D. in Material Science and Engineering from the University of Tennessee.
  • Raghuraman Ramanathan joined the college as an Alternative and Renewable Energy Applications Instructor. He earned his master’s degree in Electrical Engineering from Wilkes University in Pennsylvania.
  • Joanne Rozanski joined the college as an Instructional Support Assistant in the Dental Hygiene program, and will be working at SUNY Canton’s satellite site in Rome, N.Y.
  • Patricia Shinn joined SUNY Canton as an Assistant Professor of Nursing. She earned her master’s degree in nursing from Russell Sage University in Troy.
  • Ronald Tavernier joined SUNY Canton as a Biology Instructor. He holds a doctorate in Biology from the University of Alaska Fairbanks.
  • Susan Willette joins the college as a Dental Hygiene instructor. She holds a doctorate in Higher Education from East Tennessee State University.
  • Ali Zaidi joined the college as an Assistant Professor of Spanish. Zaidi holds a doctorate in Comparative Literature from the University of Rochester.

 

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SUNY Canton Assistant Prof’s Findings to be Presented at International Symposium

Friday, February 2nd, 2007

Charles FennerA SUNY Canton assistant professor’s new findings about U.S. employees working in foreign embassies will be presented this May at the International Workshop on Human Resource Management in Jerez De La Frontera, Spain.

Assistant Professor of Technology Management Charles R. Fenner, Ph.D., and co-author Jan Selmer, Ph.D., of the Aarhus School of Business, created The Work Situation of Public Sector Expatriates. Fenner served as an expatriate, or somebody who works outside their own country, during his 20-year career as a military officer.

“Most cross-cultural adjustment studies are based on many different types of jobs in one location,” Fenner said. “Our research turns previous studies on their head. We studied the cross-cultural adjustment of U.S. employees in the same position from across the world.”

He said their findings, based on his doctorate dissertation, demonstrate the importance of role clarity in the adjustment of the expatriate to their position. More specifically, when the expatriate clearly understands his or her role and function in the foreign environment, the expatriate’s adjustment to their work is greatly enhanced. “It’s important for the local leadership to enforce and enhance the vision of the multinational corporation overseas,” he said.

Fenner collected the information online for his dissertation while he was stationed in Moscow, Russia. He based his research on U.S. Department of Defense administrators stationed in embassies worldwide. “I saw responses everywhere as far as Ulan-Bator, Mongolia, to Santiago, Chile,” he said.

While living in Moscow, Fenner was in a comparable role to his studies. He said his personal adaptation appeared to be remarkable, but he was only interacting with counterparts who spoke English in the embassy. “My family had a harder time adjusting to their surroundings, because they were immersed in a foreign language,” Fenner noted. “Language can cause barriers to adjustment.”

Fenner is the lead faculty member for the Technology Management four-year program. He has run the office operations at embassies in Hanoi, Vietnam; Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Moscow, Russia and Bucharest, Romania. Technology Management is offered as an online program through SUNY Canton OnLine, allowing students from around the world to earn their SUNY Canton Bachelor of Business Administration degree.

 

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