Posts Tagged ‘Brian Harte’

SUNY Canton Researchers Say Investors Don’t Buy Bad Business

Thursday, November 6th, 2014

Corporate crime doesn’t pay for a company trying to gain or retain investors, according to two SUNY Canton faculty members’ research.

Professor Brian K. Harte, Ph.D., and Assistant Professor Umesh Kumar, Ph.D., recently received a best paper in session award at the Academy of Business Research fall international conference. Their presentation, “Investor Response to Convicted Firms Within and Outside of the United States,” examines stakeholders’ reaction to firms convicted of corporate wrongdoing.

kumar-harte

SUNY Canton’s Umesh Kumar, Ph.D., and Brian K. Harte, Ph.D., discuss how corporate crime impacts investor confidence. They recently presented award-winning research on the topic

Corporate crimes, even those committed outside of the United States result in a loss in investors’ confidence. These crimes also result in a loss of firm value in the long-term. This effect was found to be more significant when a firm is convicted for corporate crimes within the United States.

“Corporate crimes dent investors’ confidence severely,” Harte said. “It is important from an investors’ perspective to know whether or not a firm is convicted and the associated size of monetary penalties received for firms’ both inside and outside of the United States.”

Top global firms have been prosecuted and penalized for their corporate delinquency, including antitrust, fraud, environmental, health and safety laws, among other statutes. The researchers analyzed 127 businesses from the top global firms during 2001-2010.

“Our research shows that investors punish convicted firms by lowering equity premium,” Kumar said. “The higher the penalty imposed on firms convicted for crimes outside the United States, the higher the negative response is from investors.”

The two faculty members will be publishing their research at a later date.

 

About SUNY Canton

SUNY Canton is Northern New York’s premier college for career-driven bachelor’s degrees, associate degrees and certificate programs. The college delivers quality hands-on programs in engineering technology, health, management and public service. Faculty members are noted for their professional real-world experience in addition to outstanding academic credentials. SUNY Canton OnLine offers hundreds of flexible and convenient courses as well as eight exclusively online bachelor’s degrees. The college’s 14 athletic teams compete as provisional members of the NCAA Division III and the USCAA.

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SUNY Canton Professors’ Research Wins Award

Friday, October 19th, 2012

A research paper written by SUNY Canton’s Associate Professor of Criminal Justice Brian K. Harte, Ph.D., and Assistant Professor of Finance Umesh Kumar was recently awarded “Best Paper in [the] Financial Economics Session” at the Academy of Business Research Fall International Conference in Atlantic City, N.J.

Umesh Kumar and Brian Harte

Their paper titled, “The Regulation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and Investor Response,” which analyzes investors’ response to firms that were convicted under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) of 1977, was presented at the September conference.

In recent years, federal authorities have increased their attention toward firms violating FCPA compliance. If a firm is prosecuted and convicted under FCPA compliance, it affects not only the firm’s business interests but also the shareholders and consumers’ confidence. Their study analyzes 52 firms convicted for violations of the FCPA during 2006-2011.

“A firm operating internationally has to ensure that it doesn’t indulge in bribing a foreign official to seek business opportunities and also maintain a proper system of internal controls,” Harte said.

“Our research shows that investors are wary in making more investments in a convicted firm,” Kumar noted. “In fact, consumer confidence also suffers for these firms as sales growth becomes sluggish.”

The paper has not been published in its entirety yet. Their research paper “Corporate Social Responsibility and Investor Response in the Post-SOX Era” was also recognized as the Southern Journal of Business and Economics Best Paper in Economics at the Academy of Business Research Fall International Conference last year.

The Academy of Business Research is an international society of scholars and practitioners who exchange ideas and collaborate in a conference setting.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Manager, or call 315/386-7527.

 

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Two SUNY Canton Professors Earn Recognition for Research

Thursday, November 10th, 2011

Investors today are more likely to put their money and trust in companies that demonstrate corporate social responsibility, according to two SUNY Canton professors.

A research paper written by Associate Professor of Criminal Justice Brian K. Harte, Ph.D., and Assistant Professor of Finance Umesh Kumar was recently awarded “Southern Journal of Business and Economics Best Paper in Economics.” Their paper titled, “Corporate Social Responsibility and Investor Response in the Post-SOX Era.” was recognized at the Academy of Business Research Fall International Conference in Atlantic City, N.J., in September.

Brian Harte and Umesh Kumar

The paper examines Corporate Socially Responsible (CSR) behavior within convicted Fortune 500 companies and how it has become a cornerstone in corporate America, particularly in the post Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) Act era. CSR policy encourages companies to take responsibility for their actions and have a positive impact on the environment, consumers, employees, communities, stakeholders and beyond.

 “Corporate Social Responsibility became increasingly important for investors after companies such as Enron came under fire,” Harte said. “The SOX Act was enacted to try and create transparency for investors and curb unethical corporate behavior by providing severe punishments for both criminal offenders and the firms they represent. Before it was enacted, responsibility did not fall on single individuals within companies, but rather on the Boards within those companies. Now, many CEOs and CFOs have taken on the individual responsibilities if something goes wrong so there is a tangible person to assign blame to if need be.”

“Our research shows that companies who demonstrate social responsibility are being rewarded by investors,” Kumar noted. “Convicted firms adopting high levels of CSR behavior, garner more positive investor response in the Post-Sox era.”

The paper has not been published in its entirety yet.

The Academy of Business Research is an international society of scholars and practitioners who exchange ideas and collaborate in a conference setting.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Manager, or call 315/386-7527.

 

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Assistant Professor Awarded for Corporate Crime Research

Friday, January 7th, 2011

Brian HarteBusinesses that are engaged with the community and are focused on sustainability may be less likely to be involved in white-collar crime, according to a SUNY Canton assistant professor’s research.

Brian K. Harte, who teaches criminal justice, criminal investigation, and business courses at the College, will be receiving the Overall Best Applied Paper Award from the International Academy of Management and Business (IAMB) for his studies on the impact of federal regulations on corporate-level crime.

He said his topic of study was timely because the general public has shown outrage against unscrupulous companies, and demanded greater transparency of corporate behaviors.

“The lack of strong corporate ethics and fiscally responsible behaviors within corporations over the last decade has created the need for more external governmental controls,” Harte said. “I analyzed the behaviors and environments of Fortune 500 Companies to statistically find correlation between practices and conviction.”

Using statistical analysis, Harte was able to lend support to his hypothesis that businesses with greater access to resources are less likely to engage in corporate criminal activity. Additionally, businesses with a high level of corporate social responsibility are also less likely to be charged with corporate business felonies. “Examples of corporate social responsibility are far-ranging, and can include green initiatives, community involvement, and corporate stewardship,” he said.

He studied notable companies that had been investigated for fraudulent activities, including Enron, Worldcom, and Healthsouth.

“There were substantial differences in the corporate social responsibility reports of companies that had been indicted and those that hadn’t,” Harte said. “It supports the theory that businesses with a commitment to social responsibility are more apt to operate within the law.”

Financial measures and overall company size were not a clear indicator of illegal corporate activity, but instability, and market position may influence decisions to break business laws. Prior to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, which was developed in reaction to several high-profile corporate and accounting scandals, it was commonly believed that larger companies were more likely to engage in illegal corporate behavior. Harte found after the regulatory measures were passed, smaller companies were more likely to be convicted of crimes. “One possible explanation is larger firms have more resources, and have the ability to avoid detection of illegal acts more than smaller, financially transparent firms,” he said.

Another area of Harte’s research evaluates the effectiveness of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, sometimes referred to as Public Company Accounting Reform and Investor Protection Act. He’s trying to determine what, if any impact the act had – or if it is just business as usual in corporate America.

“The bottom line impacts all corporate decisions and the end goal is to generate revenue,” he said. “More and more I’m finding that businesses that can do that while giving back to their communities or support sustainable growth are the ones that operate within ethical boundaries. If a firm can do both then it is really a win-win scenario.”

Harte will receive his award and present his research Jan. 18 at a ceremony in Orlando, Fla., at an international conference of academic scholars from 20 countries. The IAMB is a professional association dedicated to advancing the research, teaching and practice of management and business worldwide through both academic publications and conferences.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.


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SUNY Canton Criminal Justice Students Win Regional Honors

Wednesday, November 17th, 2010

While most criminal investigation and criminal justice students collect evidence, eight SUNY Canton students recently collected trophies.

The students, members of the Beta Psi Delta club, the chapter of the American Criminal Justice Association – Lambda Alpha Epsilon at SUNY Canton, competed in the Association’s Region 4 Conference October 21-23 at West Virginia State University. After two days of written exams and rigorous competition, the students walked away with 12 wins, picking up more than half of the academic trophies awarded.

Andrew C. Wood, Katelyn A. Horton, Elizabeth A. Ayers, Michael P. Genyuk, Katherine L. Busch, Thomas J. Stafford, William R. Francis, Kenneth A. Farrell, Brian K. Harte, assistant professor for criminal justice.

One of the most notable accomplishments was the trophy Elizabeth S. Ayers came away with. She was the top overall individual competitor and earned “Top Knowledge” honors, earning a first place finish in the juvenile Justice competition, second in corrections and third in police management.

The students competed in seven categories at the conference with several students earning top-three finishes, including T.J. Stafford, who also earned first place in corrections. The University of Connecticut, University of Pittsburgh, University of New Haven, West Virginia State University, James Madison University and Radford University were among the dozen schools in attendance.

“We spend so much of our time studying and preparing for these tests, so it was exciting to do so well,” said Andrew C. Wood, president of the club. “We are really lucky to have the experienced faculty and professors that we do. Because of the hands-on work they have us do in the classroom and the experience in the field we’re required to complete, we already have a leg up in terms of preparation.”

“The conference is a great opportunity for our students to network and engage with other students, faculty and professionals from across the region,” said Brian K. Harte, assistant professor of criminal justice and the club’s advisor. “It builds upon the notion that in this field, it’s often about camaraderie and being able to work together as a unit.”

One of the additional benefits of attending the regional conference was the Criminal Justice Job Fair, held before competition began. “It’s beneficial for our seniors looking for employment, but also for juniors who are getting a head start on looking for internships,” Wood said, who noted that the FBI, DEA and State Police were among the many organizations represented.

After their success at the regional event, the students are eager to find a way to attend the Association’s national conference, slated for March 20-25, 2011 in Memphis, Tenn. Their attendance will depend on raising funds for the club to travel and compete there.

“We’re seeking support from anyone willing to help us get to Memphis,” Wood said. “We are in the process of speaking with local businesses who are interested in helping us and we will be doing a number of fundraisers on campus throughout the next few months.”

The Student Cooperative Alliance on campus has financially assisted the club over the last few years to help them get to Regionals. “We’re so grateful to them for their consistent support,” Wood said. “We told them we would need a big box to bring back all the trophies from Regionals, and we filled that box. I know if we go to Memphis, we’d fill an even bigger box. We want the chance to prove we’re more than ready to compete at the national level.”

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.


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Law Enforcement Day Tackles School Violence

Wednesday, April 14th, 2010

The SUNY Canton criminal justice program will be commemorating the anniversary of the Columbine tragedy with a Law Enforcement Day symposium on violence in schools.

The day-long event will be honoring local law enforcement professionals and providing educational topics about raising awareness of violence in schools and the community at large. Sessions and presentations will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, April 20, in the Richard W. Miller Campus Center. The event is free and open to the public.

“It will have been 11 years since the shootings at Columbine High School in Colorado,” said SUNY Canton Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice Brian K. Harte. “Our student leaders saw this date as an ideal time to reflect on school violence and create a dialog on how to best safeguard against future incidences.”

Among the topics presented at the symposium will be officer safety issues, self-defense techniques, and law enforcement recruitment. Presenters include local, regional, and SUNY Canton experts.

“These topics are highly relevant for professionals and future professionals working within education, law enforcement, and social services settings,” said Andrew C. Wood, a criminal investigation student and president of the College’s chapter of Beta Psi Delta, a Chapter of the American Criminal Justice Association. “These discussions will review previous national events like Columbine, assess current preparedness and procedures, and take a glimpse into the future. It’s an eye opener to see such a high number of middle and high schools utilizing metal detectors at their front doors.”

For more information, or to register for the event, email harteb@canton.edu or call 315.386.7967.

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Criminal Justice and Criminal Investigation Students Win at Conference

Wednesday, December 2nd, 2009

SUNY Canton’s future law enforcement professionals received high marks at the American Criminal Justice Association northeast regional conference.

Members of Beta Psi Delta, the SUNY Canton chapter of the American Criminal Justice Association, took home a handful of awards in competitions against students from 17 other colleges.

SUNY Canton Criminal Investigation students Andrew C. Wood of Ogdensburg, Elizabeth S. Ayers of Brooktondale, and Anthony M. Puretti of Canton with their American Criminal Justice Association conference awards.

SUNY Canton Criminal Investigation students Andrew C. Wood of Ogdensburg, Elizabeth S. Ayers of Brooktondale, and Anthony M. Puretti of Canton with their American Criminal Justice Association conference awards.

“This was the first time we competed at an American Criminal Justice Association conference,” noted Criminal Justice Assistant Professor Brian K. Harte, who advises the Beta Psi Delta chapter. “We hope to compete annually as a way to promote our excellent students and our career-driven programs.”

Harte and Criminal Justice Instructor Professor Elizabeth A. Erickson traveled with the students to the conference in Philadelphia, Pa.

Among the Criminal Investigation students who placed at the conference were:

  • Elizabeth S. Ayers of Brooktondale took first place in the upper division criminal law examination.
  • Andrew C. Wood of Ogdensburg took second place in the upper divisions of the criminal law examination and the police administration examination.
  • Anthony M. Puretti of Canton took second place in the upper division of the firearms competition.

The American Criminal Justice Association and its SUNY Canton Chapter emphasizes continuing excellence within the Criminal Justice fields and promotes academic excellence and leadership among students.

SUNY Canton offers a wide variety of career-driven bachelor’s, associate, and certificate programs. Most of SUNY Canton’s new four-year programs are designed so students can take them on-campus, online, or both. SUNY Canton OnLine features more than 100 courses online each semester. The College’s athletic teams belong to the NAIA’s Sunrise Conference, enabling students to compete in their respective sports for four years. Construction is now underway for the College’s new Convocation, Athletic, and Recreation Center.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.


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SUNY Canton Prof Introduces iPod Content

Monday, March 2nd, 2009
Kevin Davis, a Criminal Justice student in SUNY Canton Assistant Professor Brian Harte's class holds up his iPod during a lesson.

Kevin Davis, a Criminal Justice student in SUNY Canton Assistant Professor Brian Harte's class holds up his iPod during a lesson.

CANTON – Assistant Professor Brian Harte tells his students turn their iPods on when they come to class.

He’s using the highly-popular multi-media devices to deliver audio and video content in some of his Criminal Justice classes.

“Now I’d like you to write down all of your observations after watching this video,” Harte said as his students popped the earbuds into their ears.

The normal lively conversation in his class has been replaced by the sound of about 20 students scrolling through the menus, and then absolute silence each gazes into their video capable iPod Nano Mp3 players.

“We are right at the front of the trends in higher education by integrating these new technologies,” Harte said after the students had begun their pod-based learning exercise. “I see my students tune out all other distractions when they are watching videos and listening to audio on their iPods.”

During the trial runs, students are asked to review videos at their own speeds and make notes about what they are watching as if they were drafting a police report. The first video showed a police chase down a busy interstate. The method allows the students to watch the videos at their own speed as many times as they’d like while they record their observations.

“I liked the podcast better than watching a video in class because I felt more in control of the content,” Benjamin A. Dent, a student in Harte’s class said.

Dent’s classmates nodded in agreement as a traditional in-class conversation about the video began. The students went on to compare their notes about the chase and the police response portrayed in the podcast.

Harte said he began considering iPods as an emerging educational technology last year and filed a Campus Enhancement grant through the SUNY Canton foundation to purchase 20 iPods. “For some lessons, I think that it is best to speak in a language that students are already accustomed to, or through a method that they consider cool,” he said.

So far, Harte’s lessons consist of interactive video and audio-based lessons like the police chase. He said in the future that he hopes to stream even more interactive content to students on the devices. “You can already download a searchable copy of the New York State Penal Code as an iPhone application,” he noted.

A recent study found that students using iTunes University do better on exams than those who are strictly bound to day-to-day lectures. Podcasted lectures offer students the chance to replay difficult parts of a lecture and therefore take better notes, according to Dani McKinney, a psychologist at SUNY Fredonia, who led the study.

This modernized course delivery is nothing new at SUNY Canton. Approximately four years ago, the college launched SUNY Canton OL to deliver its online courses to broader range of students. Some of the content integrated in the high-tech course offerings is also available for iPod downloads.

Harte is the first at the college to offer the devices as learning tools in his classroom.

SUNY Canton offers a wide variety of career-driven bachelor’s, associate, and certificate programs, as well as three master’s degrees in conjunction with SUNYIT, Utica. Most of SUNY Canton’s new four-year programs are designed so students can take them on-campus, online, or both. SUNY Canton OnLine features more than 100 courses online each semester. The college’s athletic teams belong to the NAIA’s Sunrise Conference, enabling students to compete in their respective sports for four years.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.

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