Posts Tagged ‘Criminal Justice’

SUNY Canton Assistant Professor Wins 31 Consecutive Criminal Prosecution Appeals

Thursday, October 2nd, 2014

A SUNY Canton Legal Studies assistant professor has marked a milestone in his law career.

Alexander Lesyk, J.D., has won 31 prosecution appeals consecutively since September 2013. The appeals supported convictions in cases involving a wide range of criminal charges.

Alexander Lesyk“Our students benefit from receiving their education from a practicing attorney with Assistant Professor Lesyk’s breadth of experience,” said Jondavid S. DeLong, dean of the school of liberal arts. “We pride ourselves on our faculty members’ ability to use real-world knowledge in the classroom.”

Lesyk, a former chief public defender for Franklin County, and a former chief assistant district attorney for St. Lawrence County, served as assistant district attorney for appeals during the last quarter of former District Attorney Nicole Duvé’s tenure. He was then named a special prosecutor in St. Lawrence County in January, and is responsible for appeals in criminal cases in which the current District Attorney’s office has a conflict. The appeals won represent every case that Lesyk has been assigned to date.

He is currently the curriculum coordinator for SUNY Canton’s Legal Studies bachelor’s degree program. He also instructs in the college’s Criminal Justice and Funeral Services Administration programs. He was recently also named the county coordinator for the St. Lawrence County Mock Trial Program, sponsored by the New York State Bar Association. The mock trials pit local high school teams coached by area attorneys against each other in simulated civil or criminal cases.

Lesyk graduated from Fordham University Law School in 1982 and has won numerous awards in criminal law, admiralty, and indigent defense.

About SUNY Canton

SUNY Canton is Northern New York’s premier college for career-driven bachelor’s degrees, associate degrees and certificate programs. The college delivers quality hands-on programs in engineering technology, health, management and public service. Faculty members are noted for their professional real-world experience in addition to outstanding academic credentials. SUNY Canton OnLine offers hundreds of flexible and convenient courses as well as eight exclusively online bachelor’s degrees. The college’s 14 athletic teams compete as provisional members of the NCAA Division III and the USCAA.

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SUNY Canton Students to Honor K-9 Officers with Kevlar Vest Donations at Law Enforcement Day

Friday, March 14th, 2014

SUNY Canton students will help keep local K-9 officers safe in the line of duty by presenting Kevlar vests to three dogs that work side-by-side with police during the College’s Law Enforcement Day March 19.

Three student-run organizations raised the funds to outfit dogs working for the Massena Police Department, Lewis County Sheriff’s Office and the Oneida County Sheriff’s Office. The ceremony will be held at 2:30 p.m. in the Richard W. Miller Campus Center’s Kingston Theater.

The bulletproof vests are custom-made for each dog and cost approximately $1,000 each. The groups previously donated a vest to a K-9 officer working in the St. Lawrence County Sheriff’s Department.

In 2013, SUNY Canton students outfitted the St. Lawrence County Sheriff’s Department’s K-9 officer, Hershey,  with new gear that could save his life.

In 2013, SUNY Canton students outfitted the St. Lawrence County Sheriff’s Department’s K-9 officer, Hershey, with new gear that could save his life.

In addition to the ceremony, experts from across New York State and the country will share current criminal investigation and emergency response techniques. All presentations will be held in the Richard W. Miller Campus Center’s Kingston Theater and are free and open to the public. Scheduled speakers and topics are:

  • David E. Chong, White Plains Department of Public Safety commissioner, will discuss law enforcement response since 9/11 at 9 a.m.
  • Scott Schmidt, funeral director, will discuss death scene investigations at 11 a.m.
  • James Wesley, forensic chemist with the Monroe County Crime Laboratory, will discuss emerging drug trends at 1 p.m.
  • Amy Mulnix, professor of biology at Earlham College, will discuss cadaver dog training and usage at 2:30 p.m.

“Law Enforcement Day is an opportunity for our criminal justice students – and the entire student body – to hear from experts in the field,” said Elizabeth A. Erickson, SUNY Canton assistant professor of criminal justice. “Our speakers will be discussing the latest methods and procedures that are being used to solve crimes.”

The day-long event, sponsored by the College’s Criminal Justice Department, is free and open to the public.

 

About SUNY Canton

SUNY Canton is Northern New York’s premier College for career-driven bachelor’s degrees, associate degrees and certificate programs. The College delivers quality hands-on programs in engineering technology, health, management, and public service to students in the North Country, New York State, and beyond. Faculty members are noted for their professional real-world experience in addition to their academic credentials. SUNY Canton OnLine offers hundreds of flexible and convenient courses as well as eight exclusively online bachelor’s degrees. The College’s 14 athletic teams compete in state-of-the-art facilities as provisional members of the NCAA Division III and the USCAA.

 

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SUNY Canton Graduate Receives Officer Commission

Monday, December 23rd, 2013

A SUNY Canton graduate was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army during a Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) ceremony in Potsdam Dec. 18.

Second Lt. Thomas C. Hamberger, from San Antonio, recently graduated with his bachelor’s degree in Criminal Investigation. He will attend the military intelligence officer basic course at Fort Huachuca, Ariz.

“SUNY Canton professors have a wealth of knowledge and have prepared me well for my career,” Hamberger said.

Second Lt. Thomas Hamberger & Capt. Hamberger

Second Lt. Thomas C. Hamberger ’13 (right) was commissioned into the military intelligence branch of the U.S. Army Dec. 18. His brother, Capt. Christopher W. Hamberger (left), earned two degrees from SUNY Canton in 2007 and 2009.

Hamberger’s brother and mother, who attended the ceremony, are SUNY Canton alumni. Capt. Christopher W. Hamberger earned an associate degree in Criminal Justice in 2007 and a bachelor’s degree in Criminal Investigation in 2009. Ruth E. Hamberger received an associate degree in Nursing in 2005.

Second Lt. Hamberger was among five cadets who were commissioned from the Golden Knight Battalion, which trains future Army leadership from the four universities of the Associated Colleges of the St. Lawrence Valley.

“Our military, veteran and ROTC students are a vital part of the SUNY Canton community,” said SUNY Canton Acting President Joseph C. Hoffman. “Their work ethic and drive to succeed make them leaders in the classroom and beyond. Thomas Hamberger is no exception; we are extremely proud of all he has accomplished.”

Earlier this year, SUNY Canton was recognized as a military-friendly College by G.I. Jobs magazine and was included in Military Advanced Education’s 2014 Guide to Military Friendly Colleges and Universities. These exclusive lists honor the top colleges, universities and trade schools in the country that are doing the most to embrace America’s military service members, veterans and spouses as students and ensure their success.

 

About SUNY Canton

SUNY Canton is Northern New York’s premier College for career-driven bachelor’s degrees, associate degrees and certificate programs. The College delivers quality hands-on programs in engineering technology, health, management, and public service to students in the North Country, New York State, and beyond. Faculty members are noted for their professional real-world experience in addition to their academic credentials. SUNY Canton OnLine offers hundreds of flexible and convenient courses as well as eight exclusively online bachelor’s degrees. The College’s 14 athletic teams compete in state-of-the-art facilities as provisional members of the NCAA Division III and the USCAA.

 

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SUNY Canton Assistant Professor Pens Book on Forensic Investigation

Monday, March 25th, 2013

A new textbook written by SUNY Canton Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice Elizabeth A. Erickson guides readers through a mock crime scene investigation and gives them the tools they need to solve a homicide based on forensic evidence.

Elizabeth Erickson

SUNY Canton Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice Elizabeth A. Erickson holds her new text book titled “Criminalistics Laboratory Manual: The Basics of Forensic Investigation”.

Erickson said the concept for the book, titled “Criminalistics Laboratory Manual: The Basics of Forensic Investigation,” was based on questions from many students in her Introduction to Forensic Investigation course.

“They were interested in how the crime scene evidence was gathered, used in the trial, and how it all tied together,” she said. “The book is geared toward students who have little to no prior knowledge of forensic science. The manual starts with an original crime scene narrative, setting up the crime that students are to solve.”

The book, which is Erickson’s first, can be purchased on Amazon in paperback or electronically for Kindle.

Erickson was formerly a latent print examiner for the Onondaga County Center for Forensic Sciences before joining SUNY Canton. She also worked as a forensic scientist for the Indiana State Police Forensic Laboratory. Erickson holds a Master’s degree in Forensic Sciences from George Washington University.

 

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Manager, or call 315/386-7527.

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Great-Grandmother Earns Degree with Great-Grandchildren

Friday, October 19th, 2012

An 83-year-old student demonstrated that age should never be a hindrance to higher education. Myrtle Butterfield of Canton is taking courses alongside her two great grandchildren, 65 years after graduating from high school.

Myrtle Butterfield

One of the senior-most nontraditional students in SUNY Canton, Myrtle Butterfield, 83, of Canton studies between classes. Butterfield is a liberal arts major scheduled to graduate in December.

“I went to the Office of Admissions with my granddaughter-in-law,” Myrtle recalled. “I met (Admissions Counselor) Brandon Davock and when I walked out, I was enrolled in the Liberal Arts program.”

Her great-grandson, Carter K. Cutway, was a Business Management student during the Spring 2012 Semester, and Myrtle’s great-granddaughter, Jamie L. Butterfield, is in the Criminal Justice program. “Who else can say they went to College with their great-grandmother?” Cutway said.

Myrtle Butterfield

Myrtle Butterfield, 83, with her great-granddaughter Jamie L. Butterfield (right) and Carter K. Cutway (Left). All three attended SUNY Canton at the same time.

“There’s a lot of my family connected with this College,” Myrtle said. “I watched both of my great-grandchildren grow up, and now I get to go to College with them.”

Adjusting to college life did not come easy to Myrtle. “I almost quit during my first week,” she recalled, “but the Accommodative Services Office has been amazing! Everyone is so supportive. What more can you ask for?”

During time at the college and after developing a new routine, Myrtle has developed a new love of learning. She’s been on the President’s list and inducted into two honor societies, and her GPA was in the top 10 percent of her class.

Myrtle often offers advice to her younger classmates. “I went straight from high school to marriage,” Myrtle recalled. “We didn’t have the resources then that we have today. I always regretted not coming to college, but work and family always came first. I tell all of the young, beautiful and wonderful students here not to waste this opportunity.”

Myrtle has also discovered she has a talent for writing prose and poetry. She is scheduled to earn her associate degree in December 2012 and plans to work toward her four-year degree and continue writing.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Manager, or call 315/386-7527.

 

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Criminal Investigation Student Wins Award From SUNY Police Chiefs

Friday, June 29th, 2012

A volunteer firefighter and EMT who responded to the SUNY Canton Fire in Cook Hall was awarded for his dedicated volunteerism and work ethic.

Criminal Investigation Student Eli Max Receiving an Award

University Police Lieutenant Brian E. Kurish, University Police Chief Lisa E. Colbert, Criminal Investigation major Eli Max, Criminal Investigation Associate Professor Susan Buckley, and Criminal Investigation Instructor Elizabeth A. Erickson presenting Max with the Dr. McBride Criminal Justice Student Achievement Award from the SUNY University Police Chiefs Association.

Eli Max, a criminal investigation major from Freeport who currently resides in Canton, recently received the $500 Dr. McBride Criminal Justice Student Achievement Award presented by the SUNY University Police Chiefs Association.

“Eli represents the attributes we look for and foster in our students,” said Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Carli C. Schiffner, who will become the College’s Interim President on Sept. 1 following President Joseph L. Kennedy’s retirement. “He’s enthusiastic about his education and has all of the qualities of an exceptional leader. These qualities will serve him well in his future law enforcement career.”

Max is a student dispatcher for the SUNY Canton University Police, a volunteer firefighter and EMT with both the Freeport Fire Department and the Canton Volunteer Fire Department. After graduation, he’s hoping to become a detective with the New York City Police Department. Max is also the secretary for the Criminal Justice Student Organization. He was one of the inaugural members of the “Be Proud” program which is designed around the criminal justice certificate program and offers block scheduled courses mirroring a professional work environment.

“Eli was one of the first firefighters on the scene of our Feb. 10 fire in Cook Hall,” noted Elizabeth A. Erickson. “He’s demonstrated a commitment to his course work and excellent time management skills. He has maintained excellent grades on top of working long nights and weekends.”

The Dr. McBride Criminal Justice Student Achievement Award is given annually in recognition of Dr. Bruce McBride, who was instrumental in the evolution of the University Police agency and is heralded as establishing the respected professional requirements for University Police officers.

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SUNY Canton Announces New Homeland Security Degree

Wednesday, June 20th, 2012

SUNY Canton has added to its number of in-demand, career-oriented majors with the announcement of a new homeland security bachelor of technology degree.

“The Homeland Security Program is the perfect complement to both the criminal investigation and the law enforcement leadership programs,” said SUNY Canton Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Carli C. Schiffner. “Regardless of their major, students will be able to take advantage of course offerings in any of these programs to individualize their approach to their future careers in criminal justice.”

bridge

The State University of New York and the State Department of Education have both granted approval for the new program. Students can apply immediately for enrollment for the Fall 2012 semester.

“We created this program to add another specialized area of education to our options available in the overall criminal justice field,” said Susan Buckley, an associate professor and the criminal investigation department chair. “The homeland security major will prepare students to deter motivated attacks on private and public assets. They will learn how to protect people, property and infrastructures.”

Buckley explained graduates of the program would potentially be eligible to work in a private security firm, private industry, or a federal, state, or local criminal justice agencies including Immigration and Customs Enforcement (the investigative branch of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security), the International Criminal Police Organization, the FBI, and the Transportation Security Administration, among others.

“Where it differs from our current programs is homeland security students will be able to identify a wide range of threats, both foreign and domestic, and be appropriately prepared to respond to those threats,” said Paul R. Bowdre, an assistant professor and a lead faculty member in the new program.

Among key changes in the scope of learning is the integration of technology to monitor and respond to terrorist threats, including fiscal, human resource, and technological concerns.

SUNY Canton is renowned for its course offerings and esteemed faculty in its criminal justice curricula. Criminal investigation was the College’s first four-year degree and began in 1998.

To view the full program webpage, visit http://www.canton.edu/sci_health/home/.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Manager, or call 315/386-7527.

 

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Assistant Professor Awarded for Corporate Crime Research

Friday, January 7th, 2011

Brian HarteBusinesses that are engaged with the community and are focused on sustainability may be less likely to be involved in white-collar crime, according to a SUNY Canton assistant professor’s research.

Brian K. Harte, who teaches criminal justice, criminal investigation, and business courses at the College, will be receiving the Overall Best Applied Paper Award from the International Academy of Management and Business (IAMB) for his studies on the impact of federal regulations on corporate-level crime.

He said his topic of study was timely because the general public has shown outrage against unscrupulous companies, and demanded greater transparency of corporate behaviors.

“The lack of strong corporate ethics and fiscally responsible behaviors within corporations over the last decade has created the need for more external governmental controls,” Harte said. “I analyzed the behaviors and environments of Fortune 500 Companies to statistically find correlation between practices and conviction.”

Using statistical analysis, Harte was able to lend support to his hypothesis that businesses with greater access to resources are less likely to engage in corporate criminal activity. Additionally, businesses with a high level of corporate social responsibility are also less likely to be charged with corporate business felonies. “Examples of corporate social responsibility are far-ranging, and can include green initiatives, community involvement, and corporate stewardship,” he said.

He studied notable companies that had been investigated for fraudulent activities, including Enron, Worldcom, and Healthsouth.

“There were substantial differences in the corporate social responsibility reports of companies that had been indicted and those that hadn’t,” Harte said. “It supports the theory that businesses with a commitment to social responsibility are more apt to operate within the law.”

Financial measures and overall company size were not a clear indicator of illegal corporate activity, but instability, and market position may influence decisions to break business laws. Prior to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, which was developed in reaction to several high-profile corporate and accounting scandals, it was commonly believed that larger companies were more likely to engage in illegal corporate behavior. Harte found after the regulatory measures were passed, smaller companies were more likely to be convicted of crimes. “One possible explanation is larger firms have more resources, and have the ability to avoid detection of illegal acts more than smaller, financially transparent firms,” he said.

Another area of Harte’s research evaluates the effectiveness of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, sometimes referred to as Public Company Accounting Reform and Investor Protection Act. He’s trying to determine what, if any impact the act had – or if it is just business as usual in corporate America.

“The bottom line impacts all corporate decisions and the end goal is to generate revenue,” he said. “More and more I’m finding that businesses that can do that while giving back to their communities or support sustainable growth are the ones that operate within ethical boundaries. If a firm can do both then it is really a win-win scenario.”

Harte will receive his award and present his research Jan. 18 at a ceremony in Orlando, Fla., at an international conference of academic scholars from 20 countries. The IAMB is a professional association dedicated to advancing the research, teaching and practice of management and business worldwide through both academic publications and conferences.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.


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Law Enforcement Day Tackles School Violence

Wednesday, April 14th, 2010

The SUNY Canton criminal justice program will be commemorating the anniversary of the Columbine tragedy with a Law Enforcement Day symposium on violence in schools.

The day-long event will be honoring local law enforcement professionals and providing educational topics about raising awareness of violence in schools and the community at large. Sessions and presentations will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, April 20, in the Richard W. Miller Campus Center. The event is free and open to the public.

“It will have been 11 years since the shootings at Columbine High School in Colorado,” said SUNY Canton Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice Brian K. Harte. “Our student leaders saw this date as an ideal time to reflect on school violence and create a dialog on how to best safeguard against future incidences.”

Among the topics presented at the symposium will be officer safety issues, self-defense techniques, and law enforcement recruitment. Presenters include local, regional, and SUNY Canton experts.

“These topics are highly relevant for professionals and future professionals working within education, law enforcement, and social services settings,” said Andrew C. Wood, a criminal investigation student and president of the College’s chapter of Beta Psi Delta, a Chapter of the American Criminal Justice Association. “These discussions will review previous national events like Columbine, assess current preparedness and procedures, and take a glimpse into the future. It’s an eye opener to see such a high number of middle and high schools utilizing metal detectors at their front doors.”

For more information, or to register for the event, email harteb@canton.edu or call 315.386.7967.

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Criminal Justice and Criminal Investigation Students Win at Conference

Wednesday, December 2nd, 2009

SUNY Canton’s future law enforcement professionals received high marks at the American Criminal Justice Association northeast regional conference.

Members of Beta Psi Delta, the SUNY Canton chapter of the American Criminal Justice Association, took home a handful of awards in competitions against students from 17 other colleges.

SUNY Canton Criminal Investigation students Andrew C. Wood of Ogdensburg, Elizabeth S. Ayers of Brooktondale, and Anthony M. Puretti of Canton with their American Criminal Justice Association conference awards.

SUNY Canton Criminal Investigation students Andrew C. Wood of Ogdensburg, Elizabeth S. Ayers of Brooktondale, and Anthony M. Puretti of Canton with their American Criminal Justice Association conference awards.

“This was the first time we competed at an American Criminal Justice Association conference,” noted Criminal Justice Assistant Professor Brian K. Harte, who advises the Beta Psi Delta chapter. “We hope to compete annually as a way to promote our excellent students and our career-driven programs.”

Harte and Criminal Justice Instructor Professor Elizabeth A. Erickson traveled with the students to the conference in Philadelphia, Pa.

Among the Criminal Investigation students who placed at the conference were:

  • Elizabeth S. Ayers of Brooktondale took first place in the upper division criminal law examination.
  • Andrew C. Wood of Ogdensburg took second place in the upper divisions of the criminal law examination and the police administration examination.
  • Anthony M. Puretti of Canton took second place in the upper division of the firearms competition.

The American Criminal Justice Association and its SUNY Canton Chapter emphasizes continuing excellence within the Criminal Justice fields and promotes academic excellence and leadership among students.

SUNY Canton offers a wide variety of career-driven bachelor’s, associate, and certificate programs. Most of SUNY Canton’s new four-year programs are designed so students can take them on-campus, online, or both. SUNY Canton OnLine features more than 100 courses online each semester. The College’s athletic teams belong to the NAIA’s Sunrise Conference, enabling students to compete in their respective sports for four years. Construction is now underway for the College’s new Convocation, Athletic, and Recreation Center.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.


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