Posts Tagged ‘Scott Fuller’

SUNY Canton Faculty Member Presents “E-Fraction” Art Exhibition at SUNY Potsdam

Thursday, January 26th, 2012

E-FractionTwo artists with ties to SUNY Canton will be using lights and snow as their paint and canvas at SUNY Potsdam.

Assistant Professor Matthew J. Burnett, who teaches in the graphic and multimedia design (GMMD) program, and Scott Fuller, a GMMD advisory board member and an associate professor at St. Joseph’s College of Maine, are presenting a new outdoor display as part of their collaborative “E-Fraction” exhibition.

The two artists are currently displaying their paintings, photographs, sculptures, and mixed media installations at SUNY Potsdam’s Gibson Gallery and will begin molding sculptural forms in snow on Monday, Jan. 30. SUNY Potsdam will host an artists’ reception to highlight the indoor and outdoor portions of the show at 5 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 2, at the Gibson Gallery. Their outdoor work will be illuminated nightly through Feb. 7 in the SUNY Potsdam Academic Quad. Both displays are free and open to the public.

“We have plenty of winter, plenty of snow and plenty of ice in our region,” Burnett said. “I love the idea of celebrating what is unusual and beautiful about winter rather than complaining about it. There is so much complexity and power in the way ice and snow form and dominate our environment.”

Last year, Burnett and Fuller used large snow sculptures as a canvas for moving projected images of their work at a large-scale St. Lawrence University installation. Their efforts were highlighted in the March 13, 2011 Boston Globe article, “Rethinking Snow.”

The pair first collaborated in 2006 to create a kinetic sculpture exhibition in Mt. Desert Island, Maine, and then again in 2008 at Saranac Lake’s winter carnival to create a large-scale interactive illuminated spiral ice structure. In addition to the St. Lawrence University exhibition, they presented their light and snow creations last year in Long Lake using old black-and-white photographs projected on their snow creations. Both artists have shown their work regionally and internationally.

Fuller said the exhibitions take a massive amount of coordination, cooperation, and direction from both artists. He and Burnett will be relying on students and faculty members from SUNY Canton and SUNY Potsdam to help create the massive outdoor snow sculptures.

“Although we’ve worked collaboratively on large environmental exhibitions, we’ve only had one traditional indoor show together,” said Fuller. “We have lots of drawings, paintings and photographs that have been developed around these installations. Our gallery exhibition showcases over five years of working together.”

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Manager, or call 315/386-7527.

 

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SUNY Canton Artist Featured in The Boston Globe

Tuesday, March 15th, 2011

SUNY Canton assistant professor capitalized on the abundance of snow in Upstate New York as a medium for his latest artwork.

Mathew J. Burnett, an assistant professor in SUNY Canton’s humanities department who teaches in the graphic and multimedia design program, was recently mentioned in the Boston Globe for his large-scale snow sculpture installation “E-Luminations.” Burnett and fellow artist Scott Fuller, assistant professor of fine art at Saint Joseph’s College of Maine, transformed St. Lawrence University’s quad into a large-scale public art gallery using snow and several customized slide projectors in February.

“We’re used to seeing small-scale bursts of creativity in the snowmen and forts that people craft in parks and backyards,” wrote Courtney Humphries for The Boston Globe article entitled Rethinking Snow. “Yet when faced with so much excess, why not apply those impulses on a grander scale? Around the world, innovative artists, architects, and planners in cold climates have used snow as a design material, transforming it into giant pieces of public art, architecture, and landscaping.”

Enlisting the help of SUNY Canton and St. Lawrence students, Burnett and Fuller carved giant snowballs to use as canvases for projections of their abstracted paintings. Each night for a week, they used LCD and slide projectors to light up the 8-foot orbs with a colorful rotating selection of artwork.

“In our previous installation, we used old local photographs,” Burnett said. “At St. Lawrence we used images and videos of ice, water, and fire, and abstract paintings we made to enhance the visual effect of the sculptures.”

St. Lawrence University Photographer Tara Freeman captured one of the most telling images of the installation within its overall environment. It was published on the cover of the Spring 2011 St. Lawrence University Magazine and reproduced with permission for this release.

To read The Boston Globe article, visit: http://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/ideas/articles/2011/03/13/rethinking_snow/

 

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SUNY Canton Artist Exhibits at Saranac Lake Gallery

Thursday, July 8th, 2010

A SUNY Canton Faculty Member’s new work blends layers of natural chaos with artistic design.

Matthew J. Burnett, an Assistant Professor in the College’s graphic and multimedia design program, is currently displaying his most recent collaborative painting project “Clusterphobic” through July 26, at the 7444 Gallery in Saranac Lake.

SUNY Canton Assistant Professor Matthew J. Burnett puts the finishing touches on a one of his collaborative paintings currently on display in the 7444 Gallery in Saranac Lake.

His most recent work is about layers. Burnett and his colleague Scott Fuller have created a series of large-scale mixed media panel paintings inspired by the layering of beautiful or compelling patterns he’s observed during time spent in the Adirondacks. Fuller is department chair of the Visual Arts program at St. Joseph’s College in Maine and is an advisory committee member for SUNY Canton’s GMMD program.

“We are constantly trying new ways to push the mediums we work with to new levels,” Burnett said. “This body of work lends itself to innovation by its very nature. A natural occurring phenomenon like a pile of sticks, or the textures of a tree, can influence one of these pieces.”

Fuller prepares the base layer by silk-screening repeating patterns to a large panel. On a separate panel, Burnett paints his own compositions and physically cuts away areas to create negative space. The two panels are attached together to create an overall unified composition of the two artists’ work.

“We do not make matter, we collect and reassemble it,” Burnett said in a description of the show. “We do not materialize new relationships, we enable new expressions of what we have experienced.”

Also featured at the 7444 gallery is a community minded effort by Burnett and gallery director Todd Smith. The pair refurbished a vintage cigarette machine to dispense small pieces of artwork created by more than 20 regional artists. Each piece costs $1. The machine, loosely dubbed “Smokin’ Art,” is part of the burgeoning Saranac Lake Arts scene, and will be featured at various public locations during the “Third Thursday” celebrations.  “Saranac Lake is becoming a hub of contemporary and traditional artists, and I’m proud to be a part of it,” Burnett said.

One of the small works of art dispensed by a refurbished cigarette vending machine at the 7444 Gallery where Burnett is displaying.

For more about the artists, visit www.mattburnettpaintings.com and http://scottfullerart.com.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.


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