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Biology

BIOL 101 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY

Fall/Spring, 4 credit hours GER 2

A study of the major concepts in the life sciences presented for the non-major. The concepts of cell theory, cellular organization and function, inheritance, and evolution will be covered with the laboratory portion of the course designed to elaborate on these concepts. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Conditions: For students scoring less than 75 on the NYS Biology Regents exam or who did not take HS biology OR permission of instructor. Cannot be taken for credit by students with credit in Introduction to Human Biology (BIOL 102).

Biol 102 Introduction to Human Biology

Fall/Spring, 4 credit hours GER 2

A study of the major concepts in the life sciences presented for the non-major with a focus on the biology of the human organism. Concepts covered include the cell, metabolism, and a review of the systems of the body. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. The laboratory includes dissection of a representative vertebrate. For those students receiving less than 75 on the New York State Regents Biology examination, or permission of instructor. Cannot be taken for credit by students with credit in Introduction to Biology (BIOL 101).

BIOL 117 HUMAN REPRODUCTION

Spring, 3 credit hours GER 2

This course will discuss human reproduction from a biological point of view. Topics of interest will include anatomy, reproductive physiology, genetics, conception, embryology, pregnancy and parturition, and disease states. Consideration will be given to medical, psychological, sociological, and legal and ethical perspectives. Three hours lecture per week.

BIOL 150 COLLEGE BIOLOGY I

Fall, 4 credit hours GER 2

An introduction to the fundamental biological concepts common to plants, animals, and microorganisms. Topics include the chemical and molecular basis of life, metabolism, cell biology, cellular reproduction, mendelian and molecular genetics, gene regulation, DNA technology, and evolution. The laboratory includes the study of cells, osmosis, enzymes, cellular respiration, genetics, molecular techniques, and the dissection of a representative mammal. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: New York State Regents Biology examination grade of 75 or above or Introduction to Biology (BIOL 101) or Introduction to Human Biology (BIOL 102); AND HS chemistry or Introduction to Chemistry (CHEM 101/100) or Investigative Chemistry (CHEM 107/108); or permission of instructor.

BIOL 155 COLLEGE BIOLOGY II

Spring, 4 credit hours

This course consists of the study of the evolutionary history of biological diversity, plant form and function, animal development, and aspects of animal form and function including the immune system, nerve physiology, homeostasis and chemical signals. The laboratory includes structural and functional studies of representative plants and animals, bacterial transformation, photosynthesis, plant growth and development, and population dynamics. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: College Biology I (BIOL 105) or permission of instructor.

BIOL 207 HUMAN ANATOMY

Spring, 4 credit hours

This course is a detailed study of the human body with emphasis on structure with limited general function. Included topics are cells, tissues, skeletal, muscular, digestive, circulatory, respiratory, reproductive, urinary, nervous, endocrine systems and sense organs. The laboratory includes study of cells, tissues, organ systems, and dissection of a representative mammal. The course is most suitable for students in health-related, biology or Mortuary Science curriculums requiring in-depth knowledge of the human body. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: New York State Regents Biology examination score of 75 or above or Introduction to Biology (BIOL 101) or Introduction to Human Biology (BIOL 102) or College Biology I (BIOL 150) or permission of instructor.

BIOL 209 MICROBIOLOGY

Fall/Spring, 4 Credit Hours

A study of the basic characteristics of microbes, with an emphasis on disease causing organisms. Includes morphology, growth, physiology, and control. Laboratory techniques including microscopy, staining, aseptic technique, culture media, isolation, and identification of microbes. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Biology (BIOL 101) or Introduction to Human Biology (BIOL 102) or College Biology I (BIOL 105) or Human Anatomy & Physiology I (BIOL217); AND HS chemistry or Introduction to Chemistry (CHEM 101/100) or Investigative Chemistry (CHEM 107/108); or permission of instructor.

BIOL 217 HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I

Fall/Spring, 4 credit hours GER 2

This course is the first course in a sequence which studies the anatomy and physiology of the human body in detail. Topics covered in this first semester course include an introduction to the basic plan and organization of the body, basic biochemistry, basic cell structure and cell physiology and the anatomy and physiology of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. The laboratory sessions will explore detailed anatomy using models and specimens, and experimental physiological concepts. This course is appropriate for students in the nursing, physical therapist assistant, occupational therapy assistant, Dental Hygiene and other health-related fields that require a two-semester Anatomy and Physiology sequence. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: High School Biology Regents score of 75 or above, Introduction to Biology (BIOL 101) or Introduction to Human Biology (BIOL 102) and High School Chemistry Regents score of 65 or above or Introduction to Chemistry (CHEM 101) or Investigative Chemistry (CHEM 107/108); or permission of instructor.

BIOL 218 HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II

Fall/Spring, 4 credit hours

This is the second in a sequence of two courses that studies the detailed anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the anatomy and physiology of the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Also covered will be the immune system, metabolism, fluid-electrolyte-acid-base balance, and pregnancy and development. The laboratory will include a dissection of the cat. Three hours lecture, three hours lab per week.

Prerequisite: Anatomy & Physiology I (BIOL 217) or permission of instructor.

BIOL 310 THE GENOME

Fall, 3 credit hours

This course covers the fundamental concepts of molecular genetics and heredity, as well as mutations, the genetics of sex and gender, the human genome, complex traits, genetic testing, gene therapy, and the near future of human genetics. Besides providing a basis for understanding the current state of human genetic knowledge, future discoveries, and novel applications, a major focus of the course is developing the sophistication necessary to sort out myths and misconceptions about human heredity.

Prerequisites: College Biology I (BIOL 150) or Human Anatomy & Physiology I (BIOL 217) and junior level status, or permission of instructor.

BIOL 325 BIOLOGY IN SOCIETY

Spring, 3 credit hours

This course is designed to develop critical thinking concerning the growing presence of biology in society. Students will apply biological principles and the scientific method to problems and decisions confronting society. Students will use and expand upon their basic biological knowledge of DNA, molecular biology and physiology to discuss the importance and ethical impact of the use of biology in society. General topics will include DNA technology, stem cells, medicine and forensic applications, specific topics discussed may vary from one semester to the next as new issues or developments warrant. The central goal of the course is to have students leave a highly informed citizens with a greater understanding of the science behind current biological applications. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites:a grade of C or higher for one of the following courses or its equivalent: Introduction to Biology (BIOL 101), Introduction to Human Biology (BIOL 102), College Biology I (BIOL 105), Human Anatomy and Physiology I or II (BIOL 217/218), or permission of instructor.

BIOL 335 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY

Fall, 3 credit hours

This course focuses on the central concepts of cellular and tissue pathophysiology. A systematic survey is undetiaken of genetic diseases, cancer, and the diseases of the immune, nervous, endocrine, hematologic, cardiovascular, lymphatic, pulmonary, renal, reproductive, digestive, musculoskeletal and integumentary systems. The etiology, pathophysiology, and clinical manifestations of diseases are discussed.

Prerequisites: Microbiology (BIOL 209), Anatomy and Physiology II (BIOL 218), Animal Anatomy and Physiology (VSCT 144)

 

BIOL 291-295, 391-395, OR 491-495 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY

Fall/Spring, 1-4 credit hours

Special Topics in Biology will generally include topics of current interest or topics not covered in courses currently offered by the department or in combinations not currently available.