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Civil/Construction

CONS 101 ELEMENTARY SURVEYING

Fall, 4 credit hours

Course consists of both lecture and laboratory periods. Lectures include the developmental history of the surveying profession, along with the underlying principles of basic theory and practice. Realistic exercises involving linear and angular measurements, leveling, field-book recording, construction layout, and traversing are performed in the outside laboratory. Computation of errors, adjustments for instrument misalignment and weather are included in the laboratory exercises. Conversion of measurements and use of the Metric (S.I.) system is also included. Students have ample opportunity for hands-on training with the extensive variety of equipment utilized in the course. Field parties are of limited size and offer “one-on-one” instruction opportunity. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Intermediate Algebra (MATH 106) or concurrent enrollment in College Algebra (MATH 121) plus a beginning physics course or permission
of instructor.

CONS 111 COMMERCIAL STRUCTURES

Spring, 3 credit hours

The study of construction materials, practices, equipment, and terminology used in the commercial construction field. Lectures and laboratory periods develop theory and practice in excavation; foundation form work; use of reinforcing steel in concrete; erection of steel frame buildings; commercial wall and roof systems; interior and exterior wall finishes; and commercial building materials. Field trips to be arranged when practical. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.

CONS 112 WOOD STRUCTURES

Fall, 3 credit hours

The study of construction materials, practices, equipment and terminology used in buildings requiring wood framing. Lectures and laboratory periods develop theory and practice in layout and assembly of wood framing of floors, walls, roofs and trusses, and siding materials. Construction of a 2-stall garage and/or small storage shed will serve as an application of wood framing and exterior finish fundamentals. Students will perform an individual research project with a written report. One or more field trips will be arranged.

CONS 132 CONSTRUCTION DRAFTING

Spring, 3 credit hours

An introduction to the fundamental principles of engineering and architectural drafting and to the basic idea that all people involved in engineering and/or construction will communicate with drawings of some nature. It is intended that the student will have exposure to orthographic projection, perspective and isometric views, descriptive geometry, good drafting practices and engineering lettering. It is also intended to expose the student to a variety of construction prints so as to create the ability to deal with all varieties of drawings commonly emanating from architectural/engineering firms and found on construction job sites. In conjunction with manual drawing, the student applies CAD (computer aided drafting) throughout the course. One hour lecture, six hours laboratory per week.

CONS 151 BUILDING TRADES - BLUEPRINT READING AND DRAFTING

Fall, 2 credit hours

Instruction includes understanding the fundamental concepts in freehand sketching and instrument drawing needed for communication in the construction industry. Orthographic projection, pictorials and perspective drawing techniques will be introduced. A variety of drawings will be studied in order to become familiar with information contained on them and how they are interpreted. CERTIFICATE/AAS ELECTIVE CREDIT ONLY. One hour lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

CONS 172 TECHNICAL STATICS

Spring, 3 credit hours

Provides application of Newton’s First and Third Laws of motion in the force analysis of statically determinate structures such as pinned connections, trusses, beams, frames, and cables. The determination of centroids and moment of inertia is also covered. The course requires extensive application of geometry, trigonometry and algebra. The course provides fundamentals that are used in structural mechanics/strength of materials. Two hours lecture, two hours recitation per week.

Prerequisites: College Algebra (MATH 121), College Physics I (PHYS 121), or permission of instructor.

CONS 203 Advanced Surveying

Fall, 4 credit hours

This course emphasizes fundamentals of field and office procedures used in the construction industry. Major topics covered are: mapping procedures, topographic survey methods, area determinations by coordinates, determination of volumes for earthworks, horizontal and vertical control necessary for mapping and building layout, horizontal (circular) curves, vertical (parabolic) curves, and principles of boundary surveying. The student uses modern surveying equipment in field sessions, including total stations, automatic levels and lasers, geographic positioning satellite receivers and integrated mapping and surveying software for data analysis and map compilation. Two hours lecture, six hours laboratory per week (one field section and one CAD drafting section). Prerequisite: Elementary Surveying (CONS 101) or permission of instructor.

CONS/MECH 220 ENGINEERING MATERIALS

Spring, 3 credit hours

A study of the wide spectrum of materials used in manufacturing of discrete parts and machines. Material structure, characteristics, mechanical properties and applications will be stressed for ferrous and non-ferrous metals, plastics, and composites. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: College Algebra (MATH 121) and College Physics I (PHYS 121) or permission of instructor.

CONS 222 CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATING

Fall, 2 credit hours

An introduction to estimating the costs of construction. Includes quantity take-off from construction plans, unit pricing of labor, material, and equipment, and extensions based on unit prices derived from industry accepted resources such as RS Means and Timberline. The CSI Master format is introduced as a method of approach and organization. One hour lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Computer Applications for Technicians (SOET 110), Commercial Structures (CONS 111), Intermediate Algebra (MATH 106) or Technical Math 1 (MATH135), or permission of instructor.

CONS 226 BRIDGE BUILDING

Spring, 1 credit hour

Students are challenged to an intercollegiate bridge building competition that includes design, fabrication, and construction. Participating students gain practical experience in structural design, fabrication processes, construction planning, organization, and teamwork. Students will essentially design and construct a 21-foot long steel bridge that is both light and strong, and capable of supporting 2,500 pounds. The class will use their bridge design to represent SUNY Canton’s entry in the regional competition. Students meet for 45 hours per semester with classes scheduled according to the demands of the competition.

Prerequisite: enrollment in a Canino School of Engineering Technology curriculum and permission of the instructor.

CONS 233 STRUCTURAL DRAFTING

Fall, 3 credit hours

An introduction to the preparation of drawings typically used in the structural design industry. The greatest emphasis is on the creation of structural steel details. Detailing of timber and reinforced concrete structures will also be presented and performed. The lab work engages the student with “AutoCad Revit” for structures. Building Information Modeling (BIM) is introduced. Some structural design is required. One hour lecture, four hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisite:Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting and Design (SOET 116) or equivalent introductory course in the use of CADD, and Strength of Materials for Engineering Technicians (CONS 272), or permission of instructor.

CONS 272 STRENGTH OF MATERIALS FOR TECHNICIANS

Fall, 3 credit hours

The concepts of stress and strain are introduced and, in combination with statics principles, are used in the analysis of structural elements. Material properties such as ultimate strength, yield strength, elastic modulus, shear strength, torsional strength, and compressive strength are investigated using physical testing. The process of selecting structural elements such as pins, bolts, tension members, compression members, beams and shafts based on strength and factor of safety is presented and practiced. Two hours lecture, two hours recitation per week.

Prerequisites: Technical Statics (CONS 172), or Calculus I (MATH 161) or permission of instructor.

CONS 274 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

Spring, 3 credit hours

Construction management fundamentals and their applications to the conduct of a construction business. The basics of estimating, scheduling methods and expediting field operation, along with construction contracts are studied. Three hours lecture per week

CONS 280 CIVIL ENGINEERING MATERIALS

Fall, 3 credit hours

This course examines properties, common applications and methods for properly selecting the materials typically used in the constructed environment. The laboratory develops awareness with and expertise in conducting standardized field and laboratory testing on common civil engineering materials. The materials studied include aggregates, Portland cement concrete, masonry and asphalt.

Prerequisites: College Algebra (MATH 121) or Pre-Calculus Algebra (MATH 123), or Technical Math I (MATH 135)

CONS 285 ENGINEERING GEOLOGY

Spring, 4 credit hours

This course introduces engineers to earth processes and phenomena that impact the design, construction, and performance of engineered structures. Students learn to identify common earth materials, study the mechanical properties of rocks, and learn how earth materials respond to stress and strain resulting from natural forces and engineered structures. The impact of weather, erosion, landforms, structural deformation, earthquakes, and coastal processes on engineered structures are studied. The natural stability of slopes and mass movement hazards that impact the design and construction of structures are discussed. Additional topics include, but are not limited to: the development and composition of earth, geologic time, geologic mapping, an introduction to soil mechanics, and an introduction to surface water and groundwater principles. Laboratory exercises reinforce lecture material; and provide students with skills required by field engineers. Three hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: College Algebra (MATH 121) or permission of instructor.

CONS 294 SOIL INVESTIGATION

Spring, 3 credit hours

The basic properties of soil that affect construction activities are presented. Subject areas include physical condition of the soil, soil phase conditions, basic soil tests, soil classification systems, soil and water relationships, soil strength concepts, and settlement and compressibility. The laboratory work consists of standard test procedures including moisture content, specific gravity, sieve analysis, Atterberg Limits tests, compaction tests, percolation tests and in-place density tests. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: completion of Intermediate Algebra (MATH 106) or permission of instructor.

CONS 304 REINFORCED CONCRETE DESIGN

Spring, 4 credit hours

In this course, the fundamentals of cast-in-place reinforced concrete design by the strength design method are introduced. Students design slabs, beams, girders, columns and footings in accordance with current version of American Concrete Institute Code 318. Computations are done by manual methods and spreadsheets. Students are introduced to design software. In the lab, students work through the complete design of a small multi-story commercial building. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Structural Analysis II (CONS 336) or permission of instructor.

CONS 314 SOIL MECHANICS

Fall, 4 credit hours

Students initially learn about soil types, soil properties, and basic soil property tests. The remainder of the course covers advanced topics in soil mechanics. The methods of compaction, consolidation, and settlement of soil are discussed. Students learn about soil and slope stabilization techniques and design. Soil-supported foundations for buildings and structures are discussed, which include different foundation types, design methods and considerations, and installation criteria and methods. Students learn about lateral earth pressures and design of retaining structures. Methods and safety precautions for excavations are also covered. The laboratory component of the course explores soil testing methods and analytical design problems related to lecture topics. This is a writing intensive course. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week

Prerequisites: Calculus I (MATH 161), Strength of Materials (CONS 272), or permission of instructor

CONS 322 HYDRAULICS

Spring, 4 credit hours

The basics of fluid mechanics and their application to Civil Engineering Technology are considered. Fundamental concepts presented are fluid properties, specific weight, density, specific gravity, absolute and kinematic viscosity. Major topic areas covered are: resultant force and center of pressure on submerged surfaces, flow of liquids in closed conduits including pressure losses and pump requirements, flow in open channels and sewer design and flow and pressure measurement techniques. Three hours lectures, one three-hour laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Strength of Materials for Technicians (CONS 272) or permission of instructor.

CONS 324 STRUCTURAL STEEL DESIGN

Fall, 3 credit hours

An introduction to the theory, analysis and design of the elements that comprise structural steel buildings. Instruction follows the specifications and selection techniques provided in the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Manual of Steel Construction. Subject areas include determination of controlling load combinations, analysis and selection of tension members, analysis and selection of flexural members, analysis and selection of compression members, fastener strength and connection design and combined bending and axial stresses (beam-columns). Two hours lecture, two hours recitation per week.

Prerequisites: Engineering Materials (CONS 220), Structural Analysis I (CONS 236), Strength of Materials for Technicians (CONS 272), Civil Engineering Materials (CONS 280), or permission of instructor.

CONS 336 STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS

Fall, 3 credit hours

This course covers the introduction to the analysis of statically indeterminate beams and rigid frames. Methods taught include slope deflection, moment areas, three moment equation, and moment distribution. The development of influence lines is introduced. Most work is done by manual calculation, graphical methods and spreadsheets; however students are introduced to computer software for analysis of statically indeterminate beams.

Prerequisites: Strength of Materials for Technicians (CONS 272), Calculus II (MATH 162), or permission of instructor.

CONS 338 ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS

Spring, 3 credit hours

This course includes analysis of statically indeterminate structures and deflections using the principle of virtual work. Special topics in stress analysis such as internal loads due to temperature, torsion, unsymmetrical bending circumferential stresses, buckling and beams on an elastic foundation are included. The finite element method is introduced. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites: Structural analysis II (CONS 336) or permission of instructor.

CONS 350 INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Spring, 3 credit hours

The course introduces students to GIS terminology, the concept of relational databases, spatial data models, topology, raster data and vector data. Data entry methods, including quality control and metadata are discussed. The student is introduced to spatial analysis applications including terrain analysis, data manipulation and visualization. Students apply knowledge in the laboratory using GIS software.

Prerequisites:Computer Applications for Technicians (SOET 110) or good working knowledge
of spreadsheet applications.

CONS 366 STRUCTURAL STEEL DETAILING

Fall, 3 credit hours

An acquaintance with the properties, dimensions, and characteristics of present day shapes and forms is achieved by making detail and erection drawings reflecting present day fabrication and erection procedures for structural steel. Mill practices, tolerances, and billings are considered. Proper drafting techniques are observed. Selection and detailing of beams, girders, columns, and connections is carried out. Drawing prints of columns and connections is carried out. Drawing prints are made for checking purposes from the pencil drawings. The AISC handbook is used extensively as a reference. One hour lecture, four hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Structural Steel Design (CONS 324), Computer Drafting (SOET 116), or permission of instructor.

CONS 368 BUILDING ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL SYSTEMS

Offered as needed, 3 credit hours

An introduction to the major components that comprise the electrical and mechanical (HVAC) systems in a commercial building. Students study and interpret construction plans associated with these systems. Water supply, waste, drain and vent calculations are performed. Students are required to perform heat and energy calculations. Issues that impact building environmental health and indoor air quality are presented. Alternative energy approaches to heating, cooling and providing power to buildings are introduced. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites: College Algebra (MATH 121) or permission of instructor.

CONS 370 TIMBER DESIGN

Fall, 3 credit hours

The dimensional features, structural properties and behavior under load of wooden structural members are presented. Students learn standard methods for the analysis and design of timber-framed structural elements including beams, joists, rafters, posts (columns), braces, gussets and fasteners. Load and Resistance Factor Design and Allowable Strength Design are employed. Use and selection of engineered lumber products such as glu-lams and laminated veneer lumber is included. Two hours lecture, four hours recitation per week.

Prerequisites: Strength of Materials for Technicians (CONS 272), Structural Analysis I (CONS 236), or permission of instructor.

CONS 372 HIGHWAYS AND TRANSPORTATION

Spring, 3 credit hours

This course covers the design of horizontal and vertical highway alignments in accordance with American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) requirements from survey data, topographic maps and traffic data. Analysis of alternate plans using benefit cost ratios based on road user costs and first costs are included. Setting of traffic light timing for optimum traffic flow and design of parking is introduced. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites: Advanced Surveying (CONS 203), Soil Mechanics (CONS 314), Civil Engineering Materials (CONS 380), or permission of instructor.

CONS 375 STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING DESIGN

Spring, 3 credit hours

This course is an introduction to the design of structural steel, reinforced concrete, wood and masonry. This course is taught on the basis of statically determinate structures. Students are introduced to basic concepts of the design of these different materials and apply this knowledge by designing simple structural members. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites:Civil Engineering Materials (CONS 280) and either Strength of Materials for Technicians (CONS 272) and Civil Engineering Materials (CONS 280) or Structural Mechanics (CONS 263) and Structural Mechanics Lab (CONS 273) or permission of instructor.

CONS 385 HYDROLOGY and HYDROGEOLOGY

Fall, 4 credit hours

This course includes the study of surface and groundwater systems, with an emphasis on civil and environmental engineering related topics. Surface water topics include: principles of hydrology, hydrologic cycle, surface water environments, surface water flow, mass transport, flood hazard analysis, and drainage basins. Specific groundwater topics include: principles of hydrogeology, aquifers, aquitards, groundwater flow regimes and modeling, well construction and testing, porosity and permeability of earth materials, and the impact of geology on groundwater occurrence. Instruction also includes common management practices for drainage basins and groundwater. Laboratory and field exercise are used to introduce students to technologies and analytical methods used by industry to understand surface and groundwater systems. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Engineering Geology (CONS 285), Calculus I (MATH 161), or permission of the instructor.

CONS 386 WATER QUALITY

Fall, 4 credit hours

Water is one of Earth’s most valuable resources. The quality of water is essential to human health, the environment, and industrial/engineering use. This course provides students with the knowledge to determine the quality of water and how it is impacted by contaminants. Course content expands upon concepts of basic chemistry to study areas of aqueous chemistry that relate to water quality analysis. Specific topics include the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of water and the significance and interpretations of water quality properties. The fate of contaminants in natural and engineered environments are studied. Environmental and engineered systems are modeled in order to study contaminant fate and reaction kinetics. Laboratory sessions use standard water quality testing practices that are currently used in industry. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Calculus II (MATH 162), College Chemistry I (CHEM 150), or permission of the instructor.

CONS 387 WATER AND WASTEWATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES

Spring, 3 credit hours

The treatment of water is necessary to achieve the required quality necessary for a desired end-use. End-use may include, but is not limited to, drinking water, medical use, and industrial use. The treatment of wastewater streams is necessary to achieve an effluent stream suitable for disposal or possible additional processing for reuse. This course explores different chemical and physical methods of treatment for water and wastewater streams. Course content expands upon concepts learned in basic chemistry and water quality courses. Specific topics include the physical, chemical, and biological treatment processes of water and wastewater streams. Students learn design concepts for water and wastewater treatment plants. There is also a discussion of water quality standards and regulations. Laboratory sessions demonstrate standard water and wastewater treatment practices that are currently used in industry. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Water Quality (CONS 386) or permission of instructor.

CONS 388 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

Spring, 2 credit hours

This course introduces students to the many aspects of Environmental Law. Students learn the main structure of the American Legal System: sources of law, classification of law, constitutional principles, and administrative agencies that are involved in environmental issues and concerns. The litigation process for environmental disputes are examined. The evolution of environmental policy is examined and primary national policies are introduced. Environmental laws that relate to air-quality control, water quality control, toxic substance control, waste management and hazardous releases, energy, and natural resources are examined. International environmental laws, particularly those of Canada, are discussed. Two hours of lecture per week.

CONS 432 CIVIL DRAFTING AND DESIGN

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course covers the design of infrastructure for land development and the preparation of plans and specifications to construct it. Students design and prepare drawings for water supply, storm sewers, sanitary sewers, roads and site grading and drainage using CAD software. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Advanced Surveying (CONS 203), Hydraulics (CONS 122), Hydrology and Hydrogeology (CONS 385), Soil Mechanics (CONS 314), Highways and Transportation (CONS 470), or permission of instructor.

CONS 472 ADVANCED HIGHWAY DESIGN

Spring, 3 credit hours

This course focuses on the design of pavements in consideration of subgrade conditions and anticipated traffic load and on drainage of roads to meet design storm conditions. Topics include thickness design of pavements, techniques for subgrade improvement, geotextiles, and design of culverts for design storm conditions. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites: Hydraulics (CONS 122), Hydrology and Hydrogeology (CONS 385), Soil Mechanics (CONS 314), Highways and Transportation (CONS 470), or permission of instructor.

CONS 477 CAPSTONE PROJECT

Spring, 3 credit hours

This course provides a learning experience that allows a student to propose, design, and implement a project. This could be a study of a problem and solution of specific equipment, new project design, improvement of an existing product, and many others. All projects must be approved by course faculty. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites: Completion of seven semester coursework (senior level status) or permission of the program director.

CONS 485 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT

Spring, 3 credit hours

This course will introduce students to the governing, management, science, and engineering that impacts solid waste. The role of the federal government in the management of municipal solid waste is discussed, in conjunction with state solid waste legislation. Different types of solid waste streams (e.g. household waste, construction and demolition waste) and their characteristics will be examined. Students learn how to plan municipal solid waste management programs. A significant portion of the course are be spent on solid waste landfill engineering and design (e.g. liner systems, covers, leachate collection and treatment systems, groundwater flow and monitoring, gas migration and collection). Construction and operational principles of landfills are discussed. Opportunities for reduction, reuse, and recycling of solid waste are discussed as one solid waste management technique. Three hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisites: Advanced Surveying (CONS 203), Hydrology and Hydrogeology (CONS 385), Soil Mechanics (CONS 314), Water and Wastewater Treatment (CONS 387), or permission of instructor.

CONS 486 SOIL AND GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION

Spring, 3 credit hours

Students learn about the different types and characteristics of soil and groundwater contaminants. Remedial methods and technologies for soil and groundwater contamination are examined. There is review and discussion of federal and state guidance, regulations, and other pertinent legislation. Three hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisites: Advanced Surveying (CONS 203) or Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (CONS 350), Hydrology and Hydrogeology (CONS 385), Soil Mechanics (CONS 314), Water and Wastewater Treatment (CONS 387), or permission of instructor.

CONS 487 WATER RESOURCES ANALYSIS, MANAGEMENT, AND DESIGN

Spring, 3 credit hours

This course includes advanced open channel hydraulics, advanced surface water hydrology and groundwater, and well hydraulics. Management of water resources including reuse and alternative supplies is discussed. Conveyance and distribution water, as well as wastewater and stormwater collection and engineering are discussed. Students perform calculations by hand or with spreadsheets and are introduced to public domain water resources software and the Arc-Hydro data model for Geographic Information Systems. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites: Hydraulics (CONS 122), Hydrology and Hydrogeology (CONS 385), Introduction go Geographic Information Systems (CONS 350), or permission of instructor.

CONS 291-295, 391-395, OR 491-495 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CIVIL/CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

Fall/Spring, 1-4 credit hours

Special Topics in Civil/Construction Engineering Technology will generally include topics of current interest or topics not covered in courses currently offered by the department or in combinations not currently available.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.