Home > Course Descriptions

Economics

ECON 101 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 3

This course is the study of the market economy, role of government, income determination, business cycle, inflation, unemployment, banking system, monetary and fiscal policy, population, economic growth, and international trade within a market economy.

ECON 103 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 3

This course is the study of the market economy, role of government, income determination, business cycle, inflation, unemployment, banking system, monetary and fiscal policy, population, economic growth, and international trade within a market economy. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisite: Macroeconomics (ECON 101) or GER Math or permission of instructor.

ECON 105 SURVEY OF AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY

Spring, 3 credit hours GER 4

Fundamental tools of economics will be used to explain important events and issues in the history of the United States. Topics to be surveyed include the United States’ growth and transformation into an industrialized nation, development and transitions in American labor, consumers and culture, the rise of corporate America, changes in the role of government, economic regulations, monetary and fiscal policy, the origins of major institutions and their economic impact, and increased global awareness. Three hours lecture per week.

ECON 120 INTRODUCTION TO LABOR STUDIES

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

Within an historical context, this course examines the economic, social and technical forces that shape labor conditions in the USA. Among the topics covered are: the changing nature of work under capitalism, collective bargaining, theory and value of workplace skills, and the impact of economic globalization on labor. Three hours lecture per week.

ECON 201 ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL ISSUES

As Needed, 3 credit hours GER 3

This course applies basic economic concepts to contemporary social issues. The current real world public policies surrounding these issues will be examined, as well as the impact such policies have on society. Three hours lecture per week.

ECON 301 REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 6

This course provides an analytical study of economic development of one specific African region. Topics to be covered include inequality, poverty, economic growth, demography, fertility, mortality, migration, employment, education, health, trade, globalization, food production, nutrition, environment, and sustainable development. Different African regions (Central Africa, East Africa, North Africa, Southern Africa, and West Africa) will be studied on a cycle. Students may take one “Regional Economic Development In Africa” for Gen Ed. 6 credit. Students may take two “Regional Economic Development in Africa” for elective credits. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites: Macroeconomics (ECON 101), or Microeconomics (ECON 103), or Introduction to Sociology (SOCI 101), or Statistics (MATH 141) or permission of the instructor.

ECON 305 ECONOMICS OF CRIME

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course examines the behavior of criminals and uses economic concepts to analyze crimes of violence, crimes against property, and the markets for illegal goods and services. Topics covered include costs of crime to society and its various stakeholders, prostitution and drug crimes, issue of decriminalization and legalization, allocation of resources to and within the criminal justice system, crime prevention strategies, and efficiency and effectiveness of the use of punishment as a form of crime deterrence. In addition, it uses an economic understanding of crime and crime behavior to develop public policy options.

Prerequisites: Principles of Macroeconomics (ECON 101) or Principles of Microeconomics (ECON 103) and a minimum 45 credit hours, or permission of instructor.

ECON 310 ECONOMICS OF HEALTH CARE

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course introduces students to the discipline of health economics and applies economic concepts to the health care sector. Topics to be covered include the demand for health care, health production and costs, health care markets models, health insurance markets, managed care, structure, conduct and performance of pharmaceutical, physician, and hospital services industries. In addition, the role of government in health care markets and various healthcare reforms proposed in the U.S. and overseas is discussed.

Prerequisites: Principles of Macroeconomics (ECON 101) or Principles of Microeconomics (ECON 103) and a minimum 45 credit hours, or permission of instructor.

ECON 314 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

Spring, 3 credit hours GER 3

Global case studies from the private, public and nonprofit sectors are utilized to illustrate the application of economic theory and quantitative methods to managerial decision making. Students engage in problem solving exercises that will integrate various principles of business, statistics and economics to determine market forecast, pricing strategy, resource usage, and production level. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites: Accounting Principles I (ACCT 101) and student must have met the General Education Requirement in Math, or Microeconomics (ECON 103), or permission of instructor.

ECON 315 GLOBAL ECONOMY

Fall, 3 credit hours GER 6

Students examine the historical development of the global economy and the increasing inter-dependence of economies, governments, and public policy. Economic theories in international trade, finance and monetary policy are explored within the context of globalization. Contemporary global economic issues such as the environment, income distribution, and development are analyzed using case studies from various nations.

Prerequisites: Principles of Microeconomics (ECON 103) or at least 30 college credits with a 2.0 GPA or permission of instructor.

ECON 320 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS

Fall, 3 credit hours

Issues and policies involving renewable and nonrenewable energy, natural resource management, pollution control, global climate change, and sustainable development are explored through traditional neoclassical economics as well as through the contemporary approach of ecological economics.

Prerequisites/Corequisites: Principles of Macroeconomics (ECON 101) or Principles Microeconomics (ECON 103), GER Math and a minimum of 45 college credits with a GPA of 2.0 or better, or permission of the instructor.

ECON 330/FSMA FINANCIAL MARKETS AND INSTITUTIONS

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course provides an understanding of financial markets and financial institutions that operate within the financial markets. It introduces the financial markets where flow of funds occur through financial markets instruments, such as bonds, money markets, mortgage markets, foreign exchanges, stocks and derivatives (futures, forward, options, and swaps). It focuses on financial institutions, such as the Federal Reserve, commercial banks, thrifts, insurance companies, investment banks, finance companies, mutual funds, and pension funds. In addition, it provides a comprehensive introduction to risk management within the framework of financial services industry.

Prerequisites: Principles of Macroeconomics (ECON 101) or Principles of Microeconomics (ECON 103) and a minimum 45 credit hours, or permission of instructor.

ECON 291-295, 391-395, OR 491-495 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS

Fall/Spring, 1-4 credit hours

An introductory or more advanced exploration of subjects not covered or only partially covered by other courses in economics.