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Electrical

ELEC 101 ELECTRIC CIRCUITS 1

Fall, 3 credit hours

This course focuses on direct current (DC) circuit analysis with enough strength to prepare students for upper level courses in the electrical engineering technology program. Students will analyze resistive, capacitive and inductive circuits and laws/theorems including Kirchhoff's, Superposition, Thevenin's, Norton's, and Maximum Power Transfer. Students will develop computational skills. Three hours lecture per week.

Corequisite: Pre-Calculus (MATH123) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 102 ELECTRIC CIRCUITS 2

Spring, 3 credit hours

continuation of Electric Circuits (I), stressing the understanding of AC analysis that involves resistive, capacitive, and inductive circuits. Also, impedance, resonance, filters and transformers are covered. Students will analyze circuits of various configurations and enhance computational skills. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisite: Electric Circuits 1 (ELEC 101) and Pre-Calculus (MATH123) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 109 ELECTRIC CIRCUITS 1 LABORATORY

Fall, 1 credit hour

An introductory laboratory course stressing the understanding of basic concepts and principles of direct current and alternating current electric circuits by analyzing resistive, capacitive and inductive circuits through practical laboratory application. Students will also study circuits using circuit analysis software. Two hours laboratory per week.

Corequisite: Electric Circuits 1 (ELEC 101) and Pre-Calculus (MATH123) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 125 DIGITAL SYSTEMS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS I (Verizon Program)

Spring, 4 credit hours

This course presents topics in hardware and systems as used in the telecommunications industry. Electrical and digital circuits are explored. Binary numbers systems are discussed as applied to telecommunications equipment. Students will explore hardware to the modular level. Student will demonstrate use of and simulate digital circuits. Three hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Technical Math 1 (MATH 135) and Computer Applications for Telecommunications (CITA 116) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 126 DIGITAL SYSTEM FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS II (Verizon Program)

Fall, 4 credit hours

In this course students will be working with hardware and software installation with an introduction of the personal computer fundamentals. Students will connect a personal computer to a network and install and set up a printer. The course will cover managing and supporting Windows. Configure user related issues and customization. Learning how to maintain a computer and troubleshooting fundamentals. An optional topic would cover Home Technology Integration including surveillance and home automation. The course is composed of lecture and in-class demonstration. Four hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisites: Digital System for Telecommunications I (ELEC 125) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 129 ELECTRIC CIRCUITS 2 LABORATORY

Spring, 1 credit hour

A continuation of Electric Circuits 1 Laboratory, stressing the understanding of concepts that involve impedance, resonance, transformers and three phase systems. Students will study circuits of various configurations using practical laboratory application. Two hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Electric Circuits 1 Laboratory (ELEC 109) and Pre-Calculus (MATH123) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 141 INDUSTRIAL CONTROLS

Spring, 2 credit hours

A hands-on study of devices and systems used in the control of industrial machinery. The student is introduced to the theory and use of electromechanical control circuits by use of traditional “hardwire circuits.” The programming of the Allen-Bradley Micro LoGix 1000 type of programmable logic controller (PLC) is practiced. An introduction to sequencer systems that enable complex control and monitoring of machines is given. Emphasis is on learning the ability to program the equipment for effective control. Four hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisite:Electric Circuits 1 and Laboratory (ELEC 101/109), Digital Fundamentals (ELEC 165) or a basic electricity course (i.e. ELEC 261) with an introduction to three phase systems, basic logic gates, binary and hexadecimal number systems, or permission of instructor.

ELEC 145 TELECOMMUNICATIONS ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS (Verizon Program)

Spring, 4 credit hours

In this course students learn to analyze DC and AC passive circuits using Ohm’s Law, Kirchoff’s laws, and Superposition Theory. RC and RL circuits are analyzed for impedance and phase angles; troubleshooting, analysis by computer simulation using simulation software, and telecommunications applications are stressed throughout. Four hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites: Technical Math II (MATH 136) and Verizon Computer Applications (CITA 116) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 146 ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS I (Verizon Program)

Fall, 4 credit hours

This course covers the analysis and application of advanced electronic circuits as applied to the telecommunications industry. Topics include frequency response of filters, op-amps, oscillators, amplitude modulation, noise and LC circuits. Four hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites/corequisites: Telecommunications Electrical Circuits (ELEC 145), Technical Physics (PHYS 108) or permission of instructor

ELEC 161 ELECTRONIC FABRICATION

Fall, 2 credit hours

Stresses practical fabrication techniques used in electronic and communication industries. Focuses on aspects of designing, installing, testing and troubleshooting fabrication methods used in assembly and repair of electronic equipment. One hour lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

ELEC 165 DIGITAL FUNDAMENTALS & SYSTEMS

Fall, 3 credit hours

This course covers topics include: number systems, operations and codes, logic gates, Boolean algebra and logic simplification, combinational logic analysis, functions of combinational logic, latches, flip-flops, timers, and counters. Three hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisites: Electric Circuits I (ELEC 101), Electric Circuits I lab (ELEC 109), or permission of instructor.

ELEC 166 DIGITAL FUNDAMENTALS & SYSTEMS LABORATORY

Fall, 1 credit hour

This is a digital laboratory course with emphasis on topics include: Logic Gate Systems, Arithmetic Systems, Code Converters, Multiplexer and De-multiplexer, JK Flip-Flop Circuits, Counters, Shift Registers, Timers, Matrix Keypad Encoder, Serial and Parallel Data Transfer, Digital Circuit Troubleshooting. Two hours of laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Electric Circuits I/Lab (ELEC 101/109), corequisite: Digital Systems (ELEC 165), or permission of instructor.

ELEC 171 ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE I (Certificate Program)

Fall, 7 credit hours

Instruction includes fundamentals of AC and DC circuits, magnetism, DC motors and generators, use of electrical test instruments and the National Electric Code. Laboratory projects include cable, conduit and surface raceway wiring installations plus projects related to the theoretical concepts listed above. CERTIFICATE/A.A.S. ELECTIVE CREDIT ONLY. Three hours lecture, eight hours laboratory per week.

ELEC 172 ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE II

Spring, 7 credit hours

Continuation of Electrical Construction and Maintenance I. Includes additional instruction in basic AC system theory, three phase circuits, motors and motor control, transformer theory and connections. Laboratory projects include diagnosis and repair of electrical equipment including major appliances, motors and motor starters, and transformer connections. CERTIFICATE/A.A.S. ELECTIVE CREDIT ONLY. Three hours lecture, eight hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Electrical Construction and Maintenance I (ELEC 171).

ELEC 173 INTRODUCTION TO THE ELECTRICAL CODE (Certificate Program)

Fall, 3 credit hours

This course covers the basics of the National Electric Code, with electrical drawing illustrations. Topics include circuit, overcurrent protection devices, box, and wire sizing with service entrance design. A final project will include a residential electrical design in accordance with the National Electric Code.

ELEC 203 ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROJECT

Fall, 1 credit hour

Senior project (capstone) course that gives the student an opportunity to think, design, construct, and present a finished product based on knowledge/experience from previous or current courses such as electronic circuits, telecommunications, microprocessors, and industrial controls. Each team is expected to do a classroom presentation on the final project. Examples of design project: High Power Emergency Power Supply (Alternative Energy),
Industrial Monitoring System (using sensing devices), and Electronics/Communication Systems. All project proposals must be approved
by course instructor. Three hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Electrical Energy Conversion (ELEC 215), Industrial Controls (ELEC 141), Electronic Circuits (ELEC 231), or permission of instructor.

ELEC 213 MICROPROCESSORS

Spring, 3 credit hours

The 8085 8-bit microprocessor instruction set and the internal hardware register structure are studied. The basic operations of the Fetch and Execute operations are examined. The student will generate several machine programs for interfacing input and output devices to the microprocessor. The PIC micro family or the STAMP family microcontrollers will be introduced to provide the student with hardware and software experience in working with these devices. The student will use a cross-assembler to generate the software programs to be written for the microcontrollers. The RS-232C Serial data transmission interface is also studied. A writing intensive course. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Digital Systems and Laboratory (ELEC 212/219) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 215 ELECTRICAL ENERGY CONVERSION

Fall, 4 credit hours

The study of construction and operation of direct current generators and motors. The principles of operation of three-phase induction motors and alternating current generators are presented. Topics also include synchronous motor and single-phase motor principles and operation. Single-phase/three-phase transformer theory and circuit interrupting devices are also covered. Basic power transmission line circuit concepts and alternative (Green) electrical power generation methods are also investigated. Hands-on laboratory experiments are performed to reinforce the theory for each of the covered topics. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Electric Circuits 2 and Laboratory (ELEC 102/129) or permission of instructor

ELEC 225 TELECOMUNICATIONS

Fall, 3 credit hours

An intermediate course designed to give students theoretical and hands-on experience in telecommunications technology. Topics include how information is processed and transmitted, medium of transmission, Switching Hierarchy of North America (PSTN), wave propagation, line devices, Modulations, Multiplexing, Noise, Error detection, correction, and control, Transmission lines, ISDN/DSL and Antennas. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Electronic Circuits (ELEC 231) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 231 ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS

Fall, 4 credit hours

Basic theory and circuit applications of silicon, germanium, zener, light emitting (LED) and Schottky diodes, bipolar and field effect transistors (FET) are presented. The student is introduced to half-wave and full-wave DC power supplies and associated ripple filters. Zener and Active Voltage Regulators circuits are studied. The basic operation of Metal Oxide; Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFET) is also presented. Basic types of bi-polar transistor AC amplifiers (CE, CB, CC) and their FET counterparts are discussed. Three
hours lecture and three hours lab per week.

Prerequisites: Electric Circuits 1 and Laboratory (ELEC 101/109), Electric Circuits 2 and Laboratory (ELEC 102/129) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 232 INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS

Fall, 4 credit hours

The student is introduced to various electronic components and systems used in modern industry. Operational amplifier principles and applications including comparators (zero and non-zero crossing detectors), voltage followers, inverting and non-inverting amplifiers. Subtraction, summing (mixer), difference and compound amplifiers and active filters. Operational amplifier circuits are configured to make up complex analog circuits. Examples of these include the temperature controller and the pulse width modulation technique of DC motor speed control. The importance of digital computers used in modern industrial processes is stressed. Thyristors, photosensitive devices, optically coupled devices, and timer control circuits and various transducers are introduced. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Electronic Circuits (ELEC 231) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 235 TELECOMMUNICATIONS I (Verizon Program)

Fall, 4 credit hours

The organization, architecture, setup, maintenance, hardware and software aspects of local area networks. Topics include: introduction to networks; types and characteristics of different network architectures and network topologies; intra and inter-network devices; network operating systems; peer-to-peer and client/server environments; LAN setup and maintenance, network printing; and internal web server. Four hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites/corequisites: Telecommunications Electrical Circuits (ELEC 145) and Digital System for Telecommunications II (ELEC 126), Electronic Systems for Telecommunications I (ELEC 146) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 236 TELECOMMUNICATIONS II (Verizon Program)

Spring, 4 credit hours

This course will cover the basics of Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) systems. Topics include: an overview of TCP/IP networks with a focus on VoIP; an introduction to VoIP; Quality of Service (QoS); VoIP system components; VoIP protocols and VoIP protocol analysis, VoIP architecture and VoIP codecs. Four hours lecture per week.

Prerequisite/co-requisites: Telecommunications I (ELEC 235) and Digital System for Telecommunications II (ELEC 126), Electronic Systems for Telecommunications II (ELEC 255) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 237 TELECOMMUNICATIONS III (Verizon Program)

Fall, 4 credit hours

The organization, architecture, setup, hardware and software aspects of networked video delivery systems. Topics include: Video transport; compression; packet transport; multicasting; Content Ownership and Security; Transport security; IPTV-IP Video to the Home; Video File Transfer; VPN’s and Home-Office video links. A hands-on approach will be taken, with team projects throughout. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Telecommunications II (ELEC 236) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 238 TELECOMMUNICATIONS IV (Verizon Program)

Spring, 4 credit hours

A survey of current and emerging technologies in Telecommunications will be presented. Topics covered will include: audio/video systems, security and surveillance, residential systems integration, business system integration, and integration of home and small business. Four hours lecture per week.

Prerequisite: Telecommunications III (ELEC 237) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 243 COMPUTER-AUTOMATED CONTROL SYSTEMS

Spring, 2 credit hours

An introduction to some of the control software systems in use in industry. The student is introduced to structured PIC 16f877 micro family programs to the extent that various control functions can be identified and modified. Memory addressed I/O and the relationship of memory location access (analog and digital) by a PIC microcontroller program. Several computer interfaces and motor-control circuits including stepper motor interfaces are studied. One hour lecture, three hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Electronic Circuits (ELEC 231), Industrial Controls (ELEC 141), Microprocessors (ELEC 213) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 255 ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS II (Verizon Program)

Fall/Spring, 4 credit hours

This course is the continuation of Electronic Systems for Telecommunications (I) and is designed to further prepare students for the analysis and application of advanced electronic circuits as applied to the telecommunications industry. Topics include frequency modulation; communication techniques; digital, wired, and wireless; transmission lines; antennas; and fiber optics. Four hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Electronics (ELEC 146).

corequisites: Introduction to Electronics (ELEC 236) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 261 ELECTRICITY

Fall/Spring, 4 credit hours

Fundamentals of direct and alternating current circuits, resistance, inductance, capacitance, magnetism are presented. Also basic machine theory as it applies to both direct and alternating current types is covered. The theory of control devices such as relays, contactors and switches is studied. Also, basic number systems and digital logic functions are introduced. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: College Algebra (MATH 121) or Pre-Calculus Algebra (MATH 123) permission of instructor.

ELEC 263 ELECTRIC CIRCUITS

Spring, 3 credit hours

Electric circuit theory is introduced with emphasis on mathematical definitions of circuit elements. Network analysis techniques are presented within the framework of direct and alternating current theory. Transient forced and complete responses of circuits involving resistance, inductance and capacitance are analyzed via differential and integral calculus. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites: Calculus II (MATH 162), University Physics II (PHYS 132), or permission of instructor.

ELEC 332 INDUSTRIAL POWER ELECTRONICS

Fall, 3 credit hours

This course is designed to prepare students with industrial electronics skills necessary to function as technologist. Topics include: Solid States Devices, Photo-Electronics, Inverters, Power Supplies, Operational Amplifiers, Open/Closed Loop Feedback Systems, SCRs, TRIACs, Thyristors, Photosensitive devices, Optically Coupled Devices, Timer Control Circuits, Motor Control Devices, and Process Control Devices. Note: Credit is given to a student who has taken ELEC232 with a (C) grade or better. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Electronic Circuits (ELEC 231) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 343 ADVANCED CIRCUIT ANALYSIS

Spring, 3 credit hours

An advanced course designed to give students upper level circuit analysis experience. Topics include: Resistive Circuits, Nodal and Loop Analysis, Two-Port Networks, Application of Laplace Transform, Variable-Frequency Network Performance, Polyphase Circuits, and AC Steady-State Analysis. Three hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisites: Electric Circuits II/lab (ELEC 102/129), Calculus II (MATH 162) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 375 FIBER OPTIC COMMUNICATIONS

Spring/Fall, 3 credit hours

This course focuses on the transmission of information using fiber optics technologies. Topics include: Optical Fiber, Amplifiers, Transmitters, Receivers, Transceivers, Detectors, Modulation, Multiplexing, Optical Networks, Optical Sources and De-modulation. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Electronic Circuits (ELEC 231) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 380 LAN/WAN TECHNOLOGY

Spring, 3 credit hours

This course will cover topics include: Network topologies and connectivity devices, TCP/IP protocol suite and internet protocol addressing, networks and sub-networks, network-layer protocols, internet control message protocol, transport layer protocol, internet protocol version 6, configuration and domain name protocols, and Integrated Services Data Networks (ISDN). Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Telecommunications (ELEC 225) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 383 POWER TRANSMISSION and DISTRIBUTIONS

Spring, 3 credit hours

This course in electrical power generation and transmission will emphasis on those aspects that concern engineers and technologists in the performance of their tasks. Topics covered include: Hydropower, Thermal, Nuclear, and Wind Power Generating Stations, Transmission and Distribution of Electrical Energy, Direct Current Transmission, HVDC Light Transmission System, Power Stability, and Cost of Electricity. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Electrical Energy Conversion (ELEC 215) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 385 ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS I

Spring, 3 credit hours

The first of a two series of courses to prepare students for modern telecommunications industry. Topics covered include: Noise, Transmission Lines, Wave Propagations, Error Checking, Communication Transmitters/Receivers, Coding Techniques, and Computer Communications. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Telecommunications (ELEC 225) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 386 ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS II

Fall, 3 credit hours

This course is the continuation of Electronic Communications (I), and is designed to prepare students for modern telecommunications industry. Topics include: Wireless digital communications, Optical communications, Cell phone communications, CDMA, OAS, Wireless technologies, Microwave and lasers, Antennas, and Waveguide and Radar. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Electronic Communications I (ELEC 385) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 405 SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course will emphasize on hardware and the basic operating techniques of every major supporting subsystem, the reliability analysis that allow satellites to operate for years without maintenance. Topics include: Propulsion, Structure, Thermal control, Reliability, Spacecraft testing, Spacecraft attitude, System performance, Telemetry, Tracking, and Command. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites: Electronic Communications I (ELEC 385) or permission of instructor.

ELEC 416 MICROELECTRONICS CIRCUIT DESIGN

Fall, 3 credit hours

This course will analyze analog electronic circuits, digital electronic circuits, and the foundations of electronic circuit design. Topics covered include: Operational amplifier circuit design, Integrated circuit biasing and active loads, Differential and multistage amplifiers, Feedback and stability, Operational Amplifier Circuits, Nonideal Effects in Operational Amplifier circuits, and Applications and design of integrated circuits. Laboratory exercises required [Selected design projects]. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Industrial Power Electronics (ELEC 332), Electronic Circuits (ELEC 231), or permission of instructor.

ELEC 436 BIOMEDICAL ELECTRONICS

Spring, 3 credit hours

This course is designed to give students theoretical and hands-on experience in biomedical instrumentation and measurement. Topics covered include: Medical Instrument Transducers, Bio-potential Amplifiers, The pacemaker, Ultrasonic Equipment, Central Station Monitor, Electroencephalograph and Filtering, Electrosurgical Units and Laser Surgery, and Catheters and Blood Pressure Monitoring Devices. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Microelectronics Circuit Design (ELEC 416), Calculus II (MATH 162), or permission of instructor.

ELEC 477 CAPSTONE PROJECT

Spring, 3 credit hours

A learning experience by allowing students to propose, design and implement a project. This could be a study of a problem and solution of specific equipment, new product design, improvement of an existing product, and etc. All projects must be approved by course faculty. Independent Project.

Prerequisites: Completion of seven semesters coursework or permission of instructor.

Note: All students in this course must take the pre- graduation exit examination as part of this capstone course.

ELEC 488 ELECTRICAL POWER

Spring, 3 credit hours

This course covers advanced topics in AC and DC transmission such as the per unit concept of transformer and generator analysis, transient stability of power systems etc. Students learn power-flow and economic power dispatch by using both analytical techniques and power system simulators. Basic knowledge of power system control is provided by covering the topics of supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA), protective relaying etc. This course address the energy economics, efficiency and ethics of dynamic pricing and smart meters. This course also delivers topics on smart grid supply that integrate renewable and distributed generation (i.e. photovoltaic and wind).

Prerequisites: Electrical Energy Conversion (ELEC 215), Power Transmission and Distribution (ELEC 383) or permission of the instructor

ELEC 292-295, 391-395, OR 491-495 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY

Fall/Spring, 1-4 credit hours

Special Topics in Electrical Technology will generally include topics of current interest or topics not covered in courses currently offered by the department or in combinations not currently available.