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Environmental Science

ESCI 101 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 2

This course is divided into five major sections: Resources/Human Population, Matter/Energy, Ecology, Environmental Law/Economics and Risk, and Environmental Degradation. Resources/Human Population will include resources types, alternative energy sources, and human population dynamics. Matter/Energy will include the basic principles of matter and energy from a physics and/or chemistry perspective in preparation for the Ecology and Environmental Degradation sections. Ecology will include ecosystem basics, land ecosystems, and aquatic ecosystems. Environmental Law/Economics and Risk will include major laws dealing with pollution discharge/ cleanup, treatment of pollution and an economic commodity, risk, and toxicology principles. Environmental Degradation will include water resources, sewage treatment, air pollution, and hazardous/solid waste. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites: Beginning Algebra (MATH 100); Expository Writing (ENGL 101) or Oral and Written Expression (ENGL 102); or an 80 on the NYS ELA Examination; or permission of instructor.

ESCI 102 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE LABORATORY

Fall/Spring, 1 credit hour GER 2

This laboratory is designed to provide scientific laboratory experiences using environmental issues as a data source or focus. Each exercise involves the collection of data, manipulation of the collected data, and analysis of the data. The experiments include energy conservation, chemical toxicology, river/stream attributes, pond morphology, design of private sewage systems, evaluation of solar/wind power potential, solid waste/composting, and the evaluation of the distribution of an environmental contaminant. Two hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Beginning Algebra (MATH 100); Expository Writing (ENGL 101) or Oral and Written Expression (ENGL 102); or permission of instructor.

Corequisite: Introduction to Environmental Science (ESCI 101) or permission of instructor. Recommended Math Level–Intermediate Algebra (MATH 106).

If the student is also enrolled in ESCI 101 and withdraws from ESCI 101 prior to the last day to withdraw, withdrawing from this course is also required.

ESCI 105-Lecture/ESCI 106-Lab ENERGY RESOURCES

Spring, 3–4 credit hours GER 2

This course examines the physical, economic, and political interactions of the following energy resources: fossil fuel, nuclear power, biomass and solar energy. Three hours lecture per week. If lab is elected, an additional two hours laboratory per week is required.

Recommended prerequisite: students have high school algebra or equivalent.

ESCI 107 EARTH SCIENCE

Fall/Spring, 4 credit hours

This course introduces earth processes and phenomena. The birth of the universe, our solar system, and the earth are explored. The internal composition and structure of the Earth is studied. Factors that affect the structure of the earth are examined: continental drift, plate tectonics, and crustal deformation. Students learn about common earth materials that make up the Earth. The impact of weathering, erosion, running water, and glaciers on the earth’s surface and landforms is studied. Additional topics will include, but are not limited to: earthquakes, volcanoes, mass movement, geologic time, and geologic mapping. Lecture related exercises/assignments, laboratory exercises, readings, and review questions help students learn and understand the course material. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Students cannot receive credit for both ESCI 107 and GEOL 101.

ESCI 110 INTRODUCTION TO METEOROLOGY

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This is an introductory meteorology course with topics covering the structure of the atmosphere, meteorological measurements, air movement, air masses and fronts, violent storms and climate. Three hours lecture per week.

ESCI 291-295, 391-395, OR 491-495 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Fall/Spring, 1–4 credit hours

Special Topics in Environmental Science will generally include topics of current interest or topics not covered in courses currently offered by the department or in combinations not currently available.

GEOL 101 PHYSICAL GEOLOGY

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 2

This course includes a general look at the earth including its composition and structure on a large scale. The processes which cause changes in and on the earth will also be studied. Topics will include: the study of minerals and rocks, the origin and type of rocks, the rock cycle and the identification of many of the common rocks and minerals. Other major topics include: geologic time, weathering, erosion, glaciers, running water, volcanoes, earthquakes and plate tectonics. Three hours lecture per week.