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History

HIST 101 HISTORY OF EUROPE TO 1815

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 5

This is a basic survey course in European history from the Late Middle Ages to 1815. The course focuses on the political institutions, social structures, economic systems, and cultural developments that shaped European civilization. Among the topics to be studied are: the Late Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Reformation, contact between Europe and the Americas, absolutism, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution.

HIST 102 HISTORY OF EUROPE SINCE 1815

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 5

A study of European history from 1815 to the present. The focus is on the social, cultural, economic, and political changes which transformed Europe in the Modern period. Among the topics to be studied are: Napoleon, industrialization, urbanization, liberalism, nationalism, mass culture, imperialism, socialism, fascism, World War I, World War II, the Cold War, fall of the Soviet Union, and European integration.

HIST 103 U.S. HISTORY TO 1865

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 4

This course deals with the leading aspects of American history from discovery through the end of the Civil War. Attention is given to political issues, institutions, political parties, leadership, and diplomatic and constitutional questions, as well as economic, social and intellectual trends. This course also focuses on what is unique in the American historical experience, and relates American history to the broader global setting.

HIST 105 U.S. HISTORY SINCE 1865

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 4

This course deals with the leading aspects of American history from the Civil War to the present. Attention is given to political institutions, diplomatic initiatives and constitutional questions, as well as broader economic, social, cultural, religious, and intellectual trends. This course also focuses on what is unique in the American historical experience, and relates American history to the global context.

HIST 106 WORLD HISTORY TO 1500

Fall, 3 credit hours

This course offers a general survey of world history to 1500. Using a global perspective, this course examines the emergence and development of world civilizations and their cross-cultural interactions. Some of the themes examined include: ancient civilizations and empires of the Near East, ancient China, India, Classical Greece and Rome, the development of world religions, the Arab world, Medieval Europe, and Africa and the Americas prior to European contact.

HIST 107 WORLD HISTORY SINCE 1500

Spring, 3 credit hours GER 6

This course offers a general survey of modern world history since 1500. Using a global perspective, this course examines the intellectual, economic, political, social, and cultural forces that have linked and shaped the major world societies since 1500. Topics to be covered include: the development of global trade and new economic models; European expansionism; social and political revolutions in Europe, the Americas, and Asia; the development of modern political institutions; global conflict; decolonization; and the social and cultural interactions of people across national boundaries.

HIST 204 U.S. IMMIGRATION HISTORY THROUGH RACE, CLASS, AND GENDER

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 4

This course examines the history of immigration to the United States from the mid-19th century through the 20th century. The main themes of the course will include issues of race, class, and gender and how they factor into the immigration process and subsequent settlement period. A plethora of immigrant groups will be studied not exclusive to the following: Eastern and Southern Europeans, Asian and Pacific Islanders, Latin Americans, and Africans. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites/Corequisites: Expository Writing (ENGL 101) or Oral and Written Expression (ENGL 102), and Early American History (HIST 103), or Modern United States History (HIST 105), or Introduction to Women’s Studies (WMST 201); or permission of the instructor.

HIST 205 BASEBALL IN AMERICAN SOCIETY

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 4

This course examines the historical impact that baseball has had on economic, social and cultural issues in America, particularly in the twentieth century. The main themes include issues of race, class, gender, labor, and immigration and how they factor into the progression of American society. Particular topics include, but are not limited to, the Negro Leagues, Latino and Japanese participation, women, and free-agency. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites/Corequisites: Expository Writing (ENGL 101) or Oral and Written Expression (ENGL 102), and Modern U.S. History (HIST 105), or permission of instructor.

HIST 285 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

Spring, 3 credit hours GER 4

This course focuses on the unique experience of African Americans and how this experience relates and interacts with American society as a whole. The course examines major events throughout the history of African Americans in the United States. Attention is given to political, economic, social, cultural and intellectual aspects, as well as constitutional questions and the meaning of citizenship.

Prerequisites: Early American History (HIST 103) or Modern US History (HIST 105) or permission of instructor.

HIST 303 COLONIAL AMERICAN HISTORY

Spring, 3 credit hours

This course explores the important themes in the history of the British American colonies in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Particular attention is devoted to social and cultural developments, and to the bringing together of peoples from three different continents in the colonies. Other avenues of inquiry relating to such matters as imperial politics and economic growth will also be pursued.

Prerequisites: Early American History (HIST 103) and Expository Writing (ENGL 101) or Oral & Written Expression (ENGL 102) or permission of instructor.

HIST 304 UNITED STATES WOMEN'S HISTORY

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 4

This course explores the social, economic, and political themes in United States Women’s History from pre-European contact through the twenty-first century. The diversity of women is emphasized and issues of class, race, national origin, activism, work, and the role of motherhood will be explored. Citizenship and the status of women in relationship to government will be discussed and analyzed. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites: 30 credit hours, Expository Writing (ENGL 101) or Oral and Written Expression (ENGL 102), and a 2.50 cumulative GPA, or permission of instructor.

HIST 305 HISTORY OF THE VIETNAM WAR

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course provides an in-depth examination of the 20th century conflict in Vietnam through the lens of American involvement and interaction. Ideological, political, social, and economic contexts will be utilized as the events of the war are analyzed from both American and Vietnamese perspectives. The impact of the Vietnam War on American society, politics, and its Cold War foreign policy and conduct will also be scrutinized. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisite: Expository Writing (ENGL 101) or Oral and Written Expression (ENGL 102); and Modern United States History (HIST 105) or World History (HIST 217); or permission of the instructor.

HIST 307 AMERICAN THOUGHT SINCE 1865

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course is a survey of American ideas from the end of the Civil War to the present. The topics covered in this course include: debates over Darwinism, religious belief, scientific truth and aesthetic judgment, as well as the intellectual underpinnings for the major movements and institutions of the post-Civil War era including democracy, feminism, civil rights, anticommunism and capitalism. Three lecture hours per week.

Prerequisite: HIST 105 or permission of instructor

HIST 375 HISTORY OF CHILDHOOD AND YOUTH IN THE UNITED STATES

Spring, 3 credit hours

This course explores the social, economic, and political themes in the history of American childhood and youth from colonialism through the twentieth century. The diversity of children is emphasized and issues of social and economic class, race/ethnicity, national origin, gender and sexuality, activism, and work are explored. Citizenship and the status of children in relationship to government are discussed and analyzed.

Prerequisite: 30 credit hours, ENGL 101 or ENGL 102, HIST 103 or HIST 105, or permission of the instructor.

 

HIST 291-295, 391-395, OR 491-495 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HISTORY

Fall/Spring, 1-4 credit hours

An introductory or more advanced exploration of subjects not covered or only partially covered by other courses in history.