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Physics

PHYS 108 TECHNICAL PHYSICS (VERIZON PROGRAM)

Spring, 4 credit hours

This course is designed to introduce students to the physical laws and principles inherent in the study of mechanics, wave mechanics, light and optics electricity and magnetism, and time permitting modern physics. There will be an emphasis placed on the following topics: vibrations and waves, electricity and magnetism, and wave optics. Dimensional analysis and problem solving will be stressed. Four hours lecture per week.

Prerequisite: Technical Math II (MATH 136) or permission of instructor.

PHYS 115 BASIC PHYSICS

Fall/Spring, 4 credit hours

Topical coverage includes systems of units, scientific method, scientific mathematics (including basic trigonometric functions), vectors, friction, forces and translational equilibrium, torques and rotational equilibrium, uniformly accelerated motion, Newton’s Laws, work, energy, power. Emphasis is on development of laboratory and problem-solving skills including description, organization, analysis, summarization, and criticism in accordance with the scientific method. Four hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites:Beginning Algebra (MATH 100) or permission of instructor. No science background is assumed.

PHYS 121 COLLEGE PHYSICS I

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This is an introductory college physics course which uses algebra and trigonometry in developing some of the fundamental concepts of classical physics. Topics covered are units of measurement, vectors, velocity, acceleration, force, Newton's Laws of Motion, gravity, momentum, work, energy, power, circular motion, rotational motion and thermodynamics. Usually taken concurrently with Physics Lab I (PHYS 125). Three to four hours lecture per week.

Corequisite: College Algebra (MATH 121) or permission of instructor.

PHYS 122 COLLEGE PHYSICS II

Spring, 3 credit hours GER 2

This is the second semester of an introductory college physics course which uses algebra and trigonometry in developing some of the fundamental concepts of classical physics. Topics covered are properties of solids and fluids, temperature, heat, laws of thermodynamics, electric forces and fields, electrical energy, capacitance and resistance, direct current circuits, reflection and refraction of light, wave optics. Usually taken concurrently with Physics Lab II (PHYS 126). Three to four hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisites: College Physics I (PHYS 121) or permission of instructor.

PHYS 125 PHYSICS LAB I

Fall/Spring, 1 credit hour GER 2

Physics Laboratory I is a laboratory course to accompany College Physics I (PHYS 121) or University Physics I (PHYS 131). Students in these two courses will have common laboratory experiments concerning translational mechanics, rotational mechanics and graphical analysis. This course is designated as writing intensive. Two hours laboratory per week.

Corequisite: College Physics I (PHYS 121) or University Physics I (PHYS 131) or permission of instructor.

PHYS 126 PHYSICS LAB II

Spring, 1 credit hour GER 2

This is a laboratory course to accompany College Physics II (PHYS 122) or University Physics II (PHYS 132). Experiments examine electricity, DC circuits, AC circuits and optics. This course is designated as writing intensive. Two hours laboratory per week.

Corequisite: College Physics II (PHYS 122) or University Physics II (PHYS 132) or permission of instructor.

PHYS 131 UNIVERSITY PHYSICS I

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This is an introductory college physics course which uses basic calculus in developing some of the fundamental concepts of classical physics. Topics covered are measurement, vector manipulation (including unit vector notation), linear kinematics and dynamics, motion in a plane, and conservation of energy and linear momentum. Usually taken concurrently with Physics Lab I (PHYS 125). Three to four hours of lecture per week. Prior exposure to physics recommended. In some unusual situations, permission of instructor may be given.

Corequisite: Calculus I (MATH 161) or permission of instructor.

PHYS 132 UNIVERSITY PHYSICS II

Spring, 3 credit hours GER 2

This calculus based course covers topics in the area of electricity, magnetism and optics. Topics include electric fields, electric potential, conductivity, capacitance, magnetic fields, inductance, AC and DC circuits, EM waves, geometric optics and physical optics. Usually taken concurrently with Physics Lab II (PHYS 126). Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisite: University Physics I (PHYS 131)

Corequisite: Calculus II (MATH 162); or permission of instructor

PHYS 133 UNIVERSITY PHYSICS III

Fall, 3 credit hours GER 2

This is the third semester of an introductory college physics course which uses basic calculus in developing some of the fundamental concepts of classical physics. Topics covered are rotation of rigid objects, static equilibrium of extended bodies, simple harmonic motion, gravitation, fluid mechanics, the laws of thermodynamics and kinetic theory of gases. Usually taken concurrently with Physics Lab III (PHYS 127). Three to four hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisites: University Physics I (PHYS 131)

Corequisite: Calculus II (MATH 162) or permission of instructor.

PHYS 135 UNIVERSITY PHYSICS LABORATORY I

Fall, 1 credit hour GER 2

This is a laboratory course to accompany PHYS 131, University Physics I. Experiments will include one and two dimensional translational mechanics and graphical analysis.

Corequisite: University Physics I (PHYS 131) or permission of instructor.

PHYS 136 UNIVERSITY PHYSICS LABORATORY II

Spring, 1 credit hour GER 2

This is a laboratory course to accompany PHYS 132, University Physics II. Experiments examine electricity, DC circuits, AC circuits and optics.

Corequisite: University Physics II (PHYS 132) or permission of instructor.

PHYS 137 UNIVERSITY PHYSICS LAB III

Fall, 1 credit hour GER 2

This laboratory course is to accompany University Physics III (PHYS 133). Students perform experiments related to rotational motion, oscillations and waves, static equilibrium, properties ofmaterial, and thermal physics.

Corequisite: University Physics III (PHYS 133) or permission of instructor.

PHYS 202 MODERN PHYSICS

Spring, 3 credit hours

The atomic view of matter, electricity and radiation, Bohr model, relativity, particle properties of waves, wave properties of particles, introduction to quantum mechanics, quantum theory of the hydrogen atom, the solid state, introduction to Fourier series and integrals and statistical mechanics. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisite: University Physics II (PHYS 132) or permission of instructor.

PHYS 301 INTRODUCTION TO PHOTONICS

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course explores the production and nature of light including: the laws of reflection and refraction, theory of image formation, principles of wave optics (including interference, diffraction and polarization), fundamentals of fiber optic theory, principles of lasers and laser safety, and the basics of holography with image processing. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on applications of photonics in medicine, transportation, manufacturing, communications, environmental monitoring and consumer devices. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites: College Physics II (PHYS 122) or University Physics II (PHYS 132), or permission of instructor.

PHYS 330 INTRODUCTION TO CLASSICAL MECHANICS

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course is a presentation of Newtonian mechanics at the intermediate level. Topics include dynamics of particles and rigid bodies, rotating reference frames, conservation laws, gravitational fields and potentials, planetary motion, wave motion, oscillation, LaGrangian and Hamiltonian equations. Three hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisites: University Physics II (PHYS 132) or College Physics II (PHYS 122), or permission of instructor.

PHYS 340 ELECTROMAGNETISM

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course is an intermediate level presentation of the physics of the electromagnetic field. The course will explore the applications of electromagnetism in medicine (magnetic resonance imaging), and the interdependencies between electric and magnetic fields which are the essence of the theories of circuits, lines, antennas and guided waves. Topics include Electric and magnetic fields using vector methods, Gauss’s law, theory of dielectrics, Ampere’s law, Faraday’s law, vector potential, displacement current, Maxwell’s equations, wave propagation in dielectrics and conductors, and production and propagation of radiation. Three hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisites: University Physics II (PHYS 132) or College Physics II (PHYS 122), Calculus II (MATH 162), or permission of instructor.

PHYS 410 SOLID STATE SCIENCE

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course explores how the diverse properties (mechanical, electronic, optical and magnetic) of solid materials can be related to interactions at the atomistic level. Topics include crystal structures; bonding in solids; x-ray, neutron, and electron diffraction in crystals; lattice vibrations; energy bands in solids; the free-electron model; semiconductor and semiconductor devices. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites: Modern Physics (PHYS 202) or permission of instructor.

PHYS 420 INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM MECHANICS

Fall, 3 credit hours

This course is a senior-level introduction to the theory and formalism of non-relativistic quantum mechanics and its applications. This course provides the background with which to understand and meet the challenge of new applications of quantum mechanics. Principles of quantum mechanics and some mathematical techniques of solving quantum mechanical problems are examined. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisite: University Physics II (PHYS 132) or College Physics II (PHYS 122); Calculus II (MATH 162), or permission of instructor.

PHYS 291-295, 391-395, OR 491-495 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHYSICS

Fall/Spring, 1 - 4 credit hours

Special Topics in Physics will generally include topics of current interest or topics not covered in courses currently offered by the department or in combinations not currently available. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.