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Psychology

ABAP 135 PARENTING KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course examines the application of the natural science and technology of behavior to improvements both in knowledge of parenting and in child rearing skills. The range of advances in behaviorologically based child-rearing practices discovered since the 1950s is covered after reviewing scientifically uninformed practices used earlier. Behavior management–related skills for application in everyday public and personal situations involving children and their caregivers are included.

ABAP 245 INTRODUCTION TO THE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY OF BEHAVIOR

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

The first of a two course sequence, this course introduces students to the natural science and technology of behavior, behaviorology, encompassing the areas of fundamental principles, basic methods and measurements, and elementary technologies of applied behavior analysis including techniques applied in prevention and intervention settings, plus historical and philosophical perspectives, ethics, and current trends.

ABAP 310 COMPANION ANIMAL BEHAVIOR TRAINING

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course introduces the contributions of the natural science of behavior, behaviorology, to the area of animal behavior training. Students are educated about (a) the successful, non–coercive animal training practices, derived from basic principles, that are used by professional animal trainers around the world, and (b) how to teach the owners of companion animals how to train their pets. After reviewing basic principles and the significance of species differences, relevant practices are differentially applied to the pro–active, non–coercive, positive, and effective behavior training of four representative companion animal species: (a) cats, (b) dogs, (c) birds, and (d) horses. The generic application of these non–coercive practices to training other species also receives attention.

Prerequisite: (ABAP 245) Introduction to the Science and Technology of Behavior, or (VSCT 102) Companion Animal Behavior, with (VSCT 100) Human Companion Animal Bond highly recommended, or permission of instructor

ABAP 345 APPLIED SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY OF BEHAVIOR

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

In this second of a two course sequence, common problematic human behaviors from a range of ordinary settings are analyzed along with the accessible independent variables of which these behaviors are a function as discovered by the natural science of behavior, behaviorology. Together, these are examined for prevention and solutions through the basic behavior/environment engineering applications that are derived from basic principles and techniques. Also considered are (a) the historical circumstances leading to these applications, (b) the value in design over accident or chance in the control of individual behavior and cultural practices, and (c) the place of ethics in considering and solving behavior problems.

Prerequisite: Introduction to the Science and Technology of Behavior (ABAP 245), or permission of instructor.

ABAP 365 BEHAVIOR ENGINEERING: REHABILITATION

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course examines the application of the natural science and technology of behavior, behaviorology, to foster improvements in human interactions and success rates in institutional rehabilitation settings such as hospitals and prisons. The scientific basis of punishment that often informs many practices in such settings is covered along with rehabilitation considerations focused on both adult and youth clients or offenders. The course takes a systematic and data–based orientation to the organization and management of hospital or corrections personnel and institutions, and patient/prisoner rehabilitation. The development of behavior management–related knowledge and skills for application in everyday situations in institutional rehabilitation settings is an integral course component.

Prerequisite: Introduction to the Science and Technology of Behavior (ABAP 245) or Correctional Philosophy (JUST 105) or permission of instructor.

ABAP 375 BASIC AUTISM ABA METHODS

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course examines the application of the natural science and technology of behavior, behaviorology, to the interventions for children with autism using basic Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) methods. Exercising a systematic and data–based orientation, the course topics include (a) the evaluation of different approaches for effectiveness, (b) the skills to be taught to children with autism, (c) the behavior engineering practices and skills needed to teach autistic children effectively, (d) the different roles of professionals and para–professionals involved in autism intervention efforts, (e) the organizational and legal supports available to autistic children and their families, (f) the roles of different autism treatment team members, (g) the organizational and legal interactions between families with autistic children and their local schools, and (h) the answers to the most common questions asked by parents of autistic children. Examination of actual autism training curricula, programs, practices, data sheets, settings, and case histories are integral parts of the course.

Prerequisite: Introduction to the Science and Technology of Behavior (ABAP 245) or permission of instructor, with Applied Science and technology of Behavior (ABAP 345) recommended.

ABAP 380 INTRODUCTION TO VERBAL BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS AND APPLICATIONS

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

Based on natural science principles and practices, this course introduces students to (a) the behaviorological analysis of verbal behavior/language, (b) the historical context in which verbal behavior analysis arose, and (c) some applications of verbal behavior analysis especially as it is applied to enhance the acquisition of verbal behavior/language, by multi–language students or persons with developmental disabilities. Covered analysis topics include such fundamental concepts as (a) differentiating verbal and non–verbal behavior, (b) the verbal community, (c) mediated reinforcement, (d) the basic verbal behaviors called mands, tacts, intraverbals, codics, and duplics, (e) various extensions of these elementary verbal operants, (f) the most common variables of which verbal operants are a function, (g) some of the ways these variables combine in the multiple control of complex verbal behaviors, (h) response products, (i) point–to–point correspondence, (j) formal similarity, (k) thematic and formal controls over verbal behavior, and (l) the ways the verbal community teaches speakers to respond verbally to their private experiences.

Prerequisite: Introduction to the Science and Technology of Behavior (ABAP 245) and 30 credit hours, or permission of instructor.

ABAP 385 ADVANCED SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY OF BEHAVIOR I

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This first course of a two course sequence covers in detail the basic variables of which the behavior of humans and other animals is a function, as discovered from the natural science perspective and with the emphasis on increasingly complex human behavior. Included is not only the wide range of pertinent and accessible environment–behavior functional relations, but also the naturalistic philosophical foundations of the behaviorology (science and technology of behavior) discipline as well as the research methodology involved in discovering the independent variables in these relations and engineering them into sophisticated applications and interventions beneficial to humanity. Course topics include (a) classifying behavior, (b) avoiding explanatory fictions and analytical fallacies, (c) experimentally manipulating independent variables of behavior, (d) measuring, recording, graphing, and interpreting behavior–related data, and (e) turning the experimentation–based prediction and control of behavior into beneficial behavior engineering practices emphasizing postcedent processes.

Prerequisite: Introduction to the Science and Technology of Behavior (ABAP 245) and 60 credit hours, or permission of instructor.

ABAP 400 SEMINAR IN APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

In this course the student studies the current disciplinary applied research literature containing relevant interventions while engaging in supervised practicum hours applying the relevant behaviorological disciplinary principles and practices to interventions with clients in the practicum setting.

Prerequisite: (ABAP 345) Applied Science and Technology of Behavior, and 60 credit hours, or permission of instructor

Corequisite: (ABAP 401) Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis or permission of instructor

ABAP 401 PRACTICUM IN APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

In this course the student studies the current disciplinary applied research literature containing relevant interventions while engaging in supervised practicum hours applying the relevant behaviorological disciplinary principles and practices to interventions with clients in the practicum setting.

Prerequisite: (ABAP 345) Applied Science and Technology of Behavior, and 60 credit hours, and must secure permission of instructor.

Corequisite: (ABAP 400) Seminar in Applied Behavior Analysis, or permission of instructor.

ABAP 415 BEHAVIOROLOGICAL THANATOLOGY AND DIGNIFIED DYING

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

With an emphasis on the terminally ill and enhancing their dignity, this course examines the application of the natural science and technology of behavior, behaviorology, to the question of how we can improve end–of–life interactions between the dying and society, between the increasing numbers of the terminally ill and their survivors, between ourselves and our loved ones at those difficult times. The course first covers the scientific understanding of coercion and punishment as these inform many past and current social practices in such situations. The course then considers a range of scientifically grounded alternative, proactive practices capable of increasing and maintaining the human dignity of all parties in these circumstances. Which professional group (e.g., medical doctors, hospice personnel, funeral directors, behaviorologists) might best organize these improvements and new practices is explored. The historical context, and social contingencies affecting new practices, are included in the consideration of how to move from old to new practices.

Prerequisite: Introduction to the Science and Technology of Behavior (ABAP 245) , or (FSAD 307) Human Response to Death, and 60 credit hours, or permission of instructor.

ABAP 455 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT AND PREVENTING WORKPLACE VIOLENCE

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course examines the application of the natural science and technology of behavior, behaviorology, to the understanding, prevention, and deterrence of workplace violence, and does so on three levels: The course examines the scientific analysis of punishment as punishment informs many practices present in workplace settings that match the violence–prone profile. Next, the course emphasizes the acquisition and application of the behavior management–related knowledge and skills, known as performance management, that are relevant to changing the circumstances that lead to workplace violence so as to prevent its possible occurrence. Then the course extends its systematic and data–based orientation from the understanding of workplace violence, and its prevention, to developing, comparing, applying, and evaluating policies and procedures to intervene in the dynamics, indicators, types, and triggers of workplace violence to deter its imminent occurrence. These three levels are considered for all workplaces including those in industrial/manufacturing, organizational, marketing, financial, institutional, or retail business settings.

Prerequisite: Introduction to the Science and Technology of Behavior (ABAP 245) or Human Resources Management (BSAD 310) or Management Communications (BSAD 340) or Organizational Psychology (PSYC 360), or permission of instructor.

ABAP 465 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT AND PREVENTING SCHOOL VIOLENCE

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course covers the application of the natural science and technology of behavior, behaviorology, to classroom management practices to prevent school violence. The course first examines the scientific understanding of punishment and coercion because these provide the bases of many school practices that, unintentionally, prompt violence. Through a systematic and data–based orientation, the course next examines the positive, pro–active, non–coercive classroom management practices that school teachers and staff can personally implement—especially in the classroom but also in the cafeteria and gym, and on the bus and playground—to reduce and prevent the occurrence of all kinds and levels of school violence while also enhancing the effectiveness of instruction. Then the course examines the school–wide policies and procedures (as encouraged by legislation such as the New York Safe Schools act) that can be implemented to deter incipient school violence. Developing behavior management–related skills, especially those applicable to changing the circumstances that lead to school violence so as to reduce that violence, is an integral course component.

Prerequisite: Introduction to the Science and Technology of Behavior (ABAP 245) or Principles of Education (EDUC 210), or permission of instructor.

ABAP 485 ADVANCED SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY OF BEHAVIOR II

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This second course of a two course sequence covers in detail more of the basic variables of which the behavior of humans and other animals is a function, as discovered from the natural science perspective and with the emphasis on increasingly complex human behavior. Included is not only the wide range of pertinent and accessible environment–behavior functional relations, but also the naturalistic philosophical foundations of the behaviorology discipline as well as the research methodology involved in discovering the independent variables in these relations and engineering them into sophisticated applications and interventions beneficial to humanity. Course topics include (a) multi–term contingencies, (b) function–altering stimuli, (c) stimulus equivalences, (d) reinforcement schedules plus adjunctive behavior, (e) aversive controls plus more effective alternatives, (f) applied behavior research plus behavioral objectives, (g) gradual change in both stimuli (fading) and responses (shaping), (h) some complex cases (including attitudes, values, rights, ethics, morals, and beliefs), and (i) verbal behavior. A preview of the more complex disciplinary topics of consciousness, personhood, life, culture, reality, and intellectual evolution (biological and cultural) is also part of this course.

Prerequisite: (ABAP 385) Advanced Science and Technology of Behavior I, or permission of instructor.

PSYC 101 INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 3

An introduction to the scientific study of human mind emotion, and behavior from a variety of theoretical perspectives. The focus will be on the development of an objective and critical framework from which to understand the individual alone and in groups from a scientific and multi-model approach. Major topics may include: biopsychology, cognition, memory, consciousness, learning, development, social psychology, personality, abnormality, sensation, and perception.

PSYC 220 CHILD DEVELOPMENT

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 3

An eclectic approach to the growth and development of the child from conception to adolescence. A variety of major theories and research will be covered to give a balanced overview of the changes that occur in areas such as cognition, personality, social relationships, family, behavior, physical development, and sociocultural factors throughout the life of the child. Applications to parenting, teaching, and current societal trends will be discussed. This course is an alternate to Human Development (PSYC 225). Students may receive credit for only one developmental psychology course.

Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC 101) or permission of instructor.

PSYC 225 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

Description: A systematic study of behavior from conception through death with emphasis on the psychosocial, biosocial, cognitive development and sociocultural factors affecting humans during various stages of development. Special emphasis is placed on scientific methods of human study and the understanding and treatment of common behavioral.

Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC 101), or permission of instructor.

PSYC 275 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

A critical overview of the major mental and emotional disorders, their symptoms, causes, treatments, and classification. This course examines psychological disorders from multiple perspectives, including psychodynamic, humanistic, behavioral, cognitive, existential, family systems, biological, and socio-cultural. Past and current fads, myths, misconceptions, and controversies in mental health practice will be explored.

Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC 101) or Applied Psychology (PSYC 111), or permission of instructor.

PSYC 308 PERSONALITY AND INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES

Spring, 3 credit hours GER 3

This course introduces students to the diverse ways of conceptualizing, assessing, and studying personality. Personality psychology is the scientific study of the whole person. In lecture and readings, students consider trait, biological, psychodynamic, humanistic, cultural, and behavioral approaches to personality and individual differences. When discussing each of these approaches, students explore the utility of each approach for explaining individual differences as well as their stability and fluidity.

Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC 101) and Abnormal Psychology (PSYC 275) and Introduction to Sociology (SOC 101) or Instructor Permission

PSYC 310 COUNSELING THEORIES AND PRACTICE

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

A survey of the major theories of psychological counseling and common issues and principles in the practice of the helping professions. A critical presentation of the theoretical models will focus on the concepts, principles, techniques, goals, and contributions of each approach to counseling. The uses and limitations of each theory will be discussed. Issues related to the helping professions will include standards of professionalism, ethics, and legalities

Prerequisite: Minimum of 9 credits of psychology with a “C” or better average, including Introductory Psychology (PSYC 101), Abnormal Psychology (PSYC 275), Child Development (PSYC 220) or Human Development (PSYC 225), or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 315 CRISIS INTERVENTION

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course introduces students to the most common types of crisis events arising in settings such the hospital emergency room, community mental health center, community hotline, correctional facilities, and police services. It provides knowledge of the major assessment methods and models of intervention appropriate to the setting. There is also an emphasis on special groups including the development and treatment of crises with children and adolescents, college students, Native Americans, victims of violence, victims of disaster or terrorism, and vicarious trauma experienced by care-givers. Students will learn through case studies, readings, group activities and role-play experiences.

Prerequisite: Child Development (PSYC 220) or Human Development (PSYC 225) or Abnormal Psychology (PSYC 275), or permission of instructor

PSYC 340 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

Fall/Spring or online, 3 credit hours

A scientific examination of how thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by the perceived or real presence of other people (i.e., an examination of the nature and causes of individual behavior and thought in social situations). Core areas of examination include social cognition (e.g., heuristics, schemas, priming, and affect), social perception (e.g., emotion, attribution, and impression formation/management), social influence (e.g., conformity, compliance, obedience, and prosocial behavior), attitudes (including prejudice, discrimination, and stereotypes), and the self (e.g., self-concept, social comparison, stereotype threat, ego control, and ego depletion). Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 101) or Introduction to Sociology (SOCI 101) or Introduction to the Science and Technology of Behavior (SSCI 245), junior level status, or permission of instructor.

PSYC 350 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

Spring, 3 credit hours

A study of human behavior in educational settings: the application of child and adolescent development and learning principles; including use of tests and measurements, motivation, exceptional learners, classroom and behavior management, cognitive strategies, and introduction to the concept of “Expert” teacher and student.

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in Child Development (PSYC 220) or Human Development (PSYC 225) and a minimum of 30 credit hours with a GPA of 2.0.

PSYC 375 ASSESSMENT, DIAGNOSING, AND TREATMENT PLANNING

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

Students examine the process and skills needed for assessment, diagnosing, and treatment planning of substance abuse/dependence and co-occurring disorders. Students explore motivational techniques and current best practices used in the field of addiction treatment and behavioral health.

Prerequisite: SSCI 181 and HUSV 281 and PSYC 225 and PSYC 275 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 406 PSYCHOLOGY OF WORKPLACE

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 3

This course examines the intersection of the workplace and psychology. Topics include employee selection, performance & training evaluation, group dynamics, employee motivation & commitment, employee selection, leadership, organizational culture & development, and stress management.

Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC 101); OR Introduction to Business (BSAD 100); OR Introduction to Health Services Management (HSMB 101); AND 30 credit hours earned; OR permission of instructor. Recommended: Social Psychology (PSYC 340) OR Personality and Individual Differences (PSYC 308)

PSYC 410 CRISIS SKILLS AND PROCESS

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

An examination and practice of the skills, techniques, and process of counseling for students entering one of the helping professions. Specific techniques will be described, demonstrated and practiced. The stages of the counseling process and the goals and methods of each stage will be discussed and practiced.

Prerequisite: PSYC 310 Counseling Theories and Practice with a grade of “C” or better or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 291-295, 391-395, OR 491-495 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY

Fall/Spring, 1 - 4 credit hours

Individual courses of instruction of variable credit (1–4 credits) may be offered each semester. These courses are designed to expand on topics in specific areas of psychology.

Prerequisite: depends on the nature of each course.