Home > Course Descriptions

Psychology

ABAP 135 PARENTING KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course examines the application of the natural science and technology of behavior to improvements both in knowledge of parenting and in child rearing skills. The range of advances in behaviorologically based child-rearing practices discovered since the 1950s is covered after reviewing scientifically uninformed practices used earlier. Behavior management–related skills for application in everyday public and personal situations involving children and their caregivers are included.

ABAP 245 INTRODUCTION TO THE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY OF BEHAVIOR

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

The first of a two course sequence, this course introduces students to the natural science and technology of behavior, behaviorology, encompassing the areas of fundamental principles, basic methods and measurements, and elementary technologies of applied behavior analysis including techniques applied in prevention and intervention settings, plus historical and philosophical perspectives, ethics, and current trends.

HUSV 100 HUMAN SERVICES FORUM

Fall, 1 credit hour - 7 week course

This course introduces the student to the Applied Psychology curriculum in addition to aspects of the SUNY Canton First Year Educational Program. The course emphasizes aspects of the different tracks within the curriculum, the values, philosophy, and ethics of the profession along with awareness, critical thinking, problem solving, and related skills needed to be successful in academic pursuits. Student may not receive credit for both FYEP 101 and HUSV 100.

HUSV 101 INTRODUCTION TO CAREER DEVELOPMENT IN HUMAN SERVICES PROFESSIONS

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course will focus on aspects of professional and career development for individuals currently employed in non-degree entry positions seeking higher level positions or individuals interested in gaining knowledge regarding entry level career development in human services settings. Topics include an introduction to personal and professional development, community networking, crisis intervention, documentation skills, and participant supports.

HUSV 201 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

An introduction to the field of Human Services work. This course provides a sense of the scope of practice, the various fields of work and the type of clients encountered. Students will receive an overview of models of development and intervention along with an introduction to ethical conduct.

HUSV 281 FOUNDATIONS OF CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY AND TREATMENT

Spring, 3 credit hours

This course presents a study of the nature of addiction, including an overview of the addictions field, treatment approaches, assessment and diagnostic tools, treatment settings, and health concerns with substance-use disorders. Additional topics explored include pharmacology, toxicology and screening, family issues, and support groups.

Prerequisite: PSYC 101 and HUSV 201and SSCI 181 or permission of the instructor.

HUSV 305 PROFESSIONAL and ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES in HUMAN SERVICE PROFESSIONS

Spring, 3 credit hours

Students examine ethical and legal issues confronting professionals in human services careers. The course focuses on processes to address dilemmas and maintaining professional boundaries and wellness. Different professional codes of ethics are compared and contrasted.

Prerequisite: HUSV 201: Introduction to Human Services and/or Permission of Instructor.

HUSV 305A PROFESSIONAL and ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES in HUMAN SERVICE PROFESSIONS

Fall/Spring, 1 credit hour

Students examine ethical and legal issues confronting professionals in human services careers. The course focuses on comparison of professional codes of ethics, personal and professional values, multicultural and diversity perspectives, ethical decision-making, clients’ rights and counselor responsibilities.

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

HUSV 305B PROFESSIONAL and ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES in HUMAN SERVICE PROFESSIONS

Fall/Spring, 1 credit hour

Students examine ethical and legal issues confronting professionals in human services careers. The course focuses on confidentiality in regards to ethical and legal issues, managing boundaries and multiple relationships, professional competence, and ethical issues in supervision.

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

HUSV 305C PROFESSIONAL and ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES in HUMAN SERVICE PROFESSIONS

Fall/Spring, 1 credit hour

Students examine ethical and legal issues confronting professionals in human services careers. The course focuses on ethical issues in theory and practice, couples and families, group work, community and social justice.

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

HUSV 310 WORKING IN HUMAN SERVICE AGENCIES

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course introduces the student to an understanding of the basic skills and knowledge required of entry-level personnel in human service agencies. The course examines the conditions creating human needs and how agencies respond to those needs. Emphasis will be on working with others in a human service agency, how these agencies get services to people in need, and how professionals help clients to function more effectively.

Prerequisite: HUSV 201: Introduction to Human Services and/or Permission of Instructor.

HUSV 325 GROUP LEADERSHIP SKILLS

Spring, 3 credit hours

This course identifies and introduces the crucial skills that are necessary for competence in the area of understanding systems and conducting groups. Topics to be addressed include working with different types of groups, the counseling process, and responding to cultural differences that may affect group process. Special populations such as children, adolescents, elderly, mental health and addiction, survivors of sexual abuse, and divorced couples are explored.

Prerequisite: PSYC 310: Counseling Theories

Corequisite: PSYC 410: Counseling Skills

HUSV 350 CARE COORDINATION, DOCUMENTATION, AND REFERRAL SKILLS

Fall, 3 credit hours

This course offers specialized, applied knowledge in the development of skills for the care coordination process, from intake to termination. Actual agency documentation forms give students the opportunity to prepare and manage files using electronic means. Referral skills are also be emphasized.

Prerequisite: SSCI 181 and HUSV 281 or permission of the instructor

HUSV 415 ADDICTION TREATMENT COLLOQUIUM

Fall, 3 credit hours

This course introduces students to specialized knowledge of topics in the field of addiction treatment. Students use this information to supplement the treatment process and to broaden their scope of practice.

Prerequisite: SSCI 181 and HUSV 281 or permission of the instructor

HUSV 420 SEMINAR IN HUMAN SERVICES

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

Issues related to public policy, professional behavior, interpersonal dynamics, and work-related skills related to human service settings will be the focus. Students will also be expected to pursue placements for HUSV 421. Students must obtain program faculty approval before registering.

Prerequisite: Intro to Human Services (HUSV 201) and Theory and Practice of Counseling (PSYC 310) or permission of instructor.

HUSV 421 HUMAN SERVICES PRACTICUM I

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

In this course, under direct supervision of direct care staff and supervisors, students will be provided with the opportunity to put the knowledge and skills they have learned in the classroom into practice in a human services organization. Students accepted into this practicum are required to complete a minimum of 125 hours of field experience. Per the laws of the New York State Office of the Professions, students will not be directly involved in decisions regarding client evaluations, diagnosis, and treatment planning.

Prerequisite: PSYC 310, Senior Status and permission of instructor

PSYC 101 INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 3

An introduction to the scientific study of human mind emotion, and behavior from a variety of theoretical perspectives. The focus will be on the development of an objective and critical framework from which to understand the individual alone and in groups from a scientific and multi-model approach. Major topics may include: biopsychology, cognition, memory, consciousness, learning, development, social psychology, personality, abnormality, sensation, and perception.

PSYC 220 CHILD DEVELOPMENT

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 3

An eclectic approach to the growth and development of the child from conception to adolescence. A variety of major theories and research will be covered to give a balanced overview of the changes that occur in areas such as cognition, personality, social relationships, family, behavior, physical development, and sociocultural factors throughout the life of the child. Applications to parenting, teaching, and current societal trends will be discussed. This course is an alternate to Human Development (PSYC 225). Students may receive credit for only one developmental psychology course.

Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC 101) or permission of instructor.

PSYC 225 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

Description: A systematic study of behavior from conception through death with emphasis on the psychosocial, biosocial, cognitive development and sociocultural factors affecting humans during various stages of development. Special emphasis is placed on scientific methods of human study and the understanding and treatment of common behavioral.

Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC 101), or permission of instructor.

PSYC 275 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

A critical overview of the major mental and emotional disorders, their symptoms, causes, treatments, and classification. This course examines psychological disorders from multiple perspectives, including psychodynamic, humanistic, behavioral, cognitive, existential, family systems, biological, and socio-cultural. Past and current fads, myths, misconceptions, and controversies in mental health practice will be explored.

Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC 101) or Applied Psychology (PSYC 111), or permission of instructor.

PSYC 308 PERSONALITY AND INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES

Spring, 3 credit hours GER 3

This course introduces students to the diverse ways of conceptualizing, assessing, and studying personality. Personality psychology is the scientific study of the whole person. In lecture and readings, students consider trait, biological, psychodynamic, humanistic, cultural, and behavioral approaches to personality and individual differences. When discussing each of these approaches, students explore the utility of each approach for explaining individual differences as well as their stability and fluidity.

Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC 101) and Abnormal Psychology (PSYC 275) and Introduction to Sociology (SOC 101) or Instructor Permission

PSYC 310 COUNSELING THEORIES AND PRACTICE

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

A survey of the major theories of psychological counseling and common issues and principles in the practice of the helping professions. A critical presentation of the theoretical models will focus on the concepts, principles, techniques, goals, and contributions of each approach to counseling. The uses and limitations of each theory will be discussed. Issues related to the helping professions will include standards of professionalism, ethics, and legalities

Prerequisite: Minimum of 9 credits of psychology with a “C” or better average, including Introductory Psychology (PSYC 101), Abnormal Psychology (PSYC 275), Child Development (PSYC 220) or Human Development (PSYC 225), or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 315 CRISIS INTERVENTION

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course introduces students to the most common types of crisis events arising in settings such the hospital emergency room, community mental health center, community hotline, correctional facilities, and police services. It provides knowledge of the major assessment methods and models of intervention appropriate to the setting. There is also an emphasis on special groups including the development and treatment of crises with children and adolescents, college students, Native Americans, victims of violence, victims of disaster or terrorism, and vicarious trauma experienced by care-givers. Students will learn through case studies, readings, group activities and role-play experiences.

Prerequisite: Child Development (PSYC 220) or Human Development (PSYC 225) or Abnormal Psychology (PSYC 275), or permission of instructor

PSYC 340 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

Fall/Spring or online, 3 credit hours

A scientific examination of how thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by the perceived or real presence of other people (i.e., an examination of the nature and causes of individual behavior and thought in social situations). Core areas of examination include social cognition (e.g., heuristics, schemas, priming, and affect), social perception (e.g., emotion, attribution, and impression formation/management), social influence (e.g., conformity, compliance, obedience, and prosocial behavior), attitudes (including prejudice, discrimination, and stereotypes), and the self (e.g., self-concept, social comparison, stereotype threat, ego control, and ego depletion). Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 101) or Introduction to Sociology (SOCI 101) or Introduction to the Science and Technology of Behavior (SSCI 245), junior level status, or permission of instructor.

PSYC 350 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

Spring, 3 credit hours

A study of human behavior in educational settings: the application of child and adolescent development and learning principles; including use of tests and measurements, motivation, exceptional learners, classroom and behavior management, cognitive strategies, and introduction to the concept of “Expert” teacher and student.

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in Child Development (PSYC 220) or Human Development (PSYC 225) and a minimum of 30 credit hours with a GPA of 2.0.

PSYC 375 ASSESSMENT, DIAGNOSING, AND TREATMENT PLANNING

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

Students examine the process and skills needed for assessment, diagnosing, and treatment planning of substance abuse/dependence and co-occurring disorders. Students explore motivational techniques and current best practices used in the field of addiction treatment and behavioral health.

Prerequisite: SSCI 181 and HUSV 281 and PSYC 225 and PSYC 275 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 406 PSYCHOLOGY OF WORKPLACE

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 3

This course examines the intersection of the workplace and psychology. Topics include employee selection, performance & training evaluation, group dynamics, employee motivation & commitment, employee selection, leadership, organizational culture & development, and stress management.

Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC 101); OR Introduction to Business (BSAD 100); OR Introduction to Health Services Management (HSMB 101); AND 30 credit hours earned; OR permission of instructor. Recommended: Social Psychology (PSYC 340) OR Personality and Individual Differences (PSYC 308)

PSYC 410 COUNSELING SKILLS and PROCEDURES

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

An examination and practice of the skills, techniques, and process of counseling for students entering one of the helping professions. Specific techniques will be described, demonstrated and practiced. The stages of the counseling process and the goals and methods of each stage will be discussed and practiced.

Prerequisite: PSYC 310 Counseling Theories and Practice with a grade of “C” or better or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 291-295, 391-395, OR 491-495 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY

Fall/Spring, 1 - 4 credit hours

Individual courses of instruction of variable credit (1–4 credits) may be offered each semester. These courses are designed to expand on topics in specific areas of psychology.

Prerequisite: depends on the nature of each course.