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Social Science

SSCI 181 ALCOHOL, DRUGS, AND SOCIETY

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 3

Students examine the various aspects of drug abuse and addiction including theories, models, individual drug classifications, and social consequences. Additional topics include the impact on family systems, overview of treatment approaches, and public policy in the United States.

SSCI 221 INTRODUCTION TO CHINESE HISTORY AND CULTURE

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 6

This course introduces students to the major aspects of Chinese history and culture. The first seven weeks of the semester are focused on the history of China before 1949, particularly the major Chinese dynasties together with coverage of the historical events, people as well as their significance and influence; the second seven weeks cover a variety of topics related to post-1949 China’s political structure, economic reform, population policy and educational system, etc. The knowledge that the students have learned at the “history” stage enables them to have a deeper understanding of today’s China.

SSCI 271 CONTEMPORARY GLOBAL ISSUES

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 6

This course introduces students to global politics and issues through the lens of globalization. In this class, students will learn about how globalization relates to political systems, environmental issues, poverty, migration, human rights, terrorism, conflict, the economy and trade. The focus is on the interrelated nature of politics, society, and economics across the globe and on the shared future we forge.

SSCI 275 INTRODUCTION TO UKRAINE

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 5

Introduction to major aspects of Ukrainian culture and history. Cultural topics related to family, religion, population demographics, government, arts, music, literature and education will be included. Contemporary life in Ukraine and the broad sweep of historical forces contributing to today’s culture will be the focus of the course. The recent events in Ukraine will be discussed, such as the election of October-December 2004 and the “Orange Revolution.” Ukraine gained its independence in 1991 and is fiercely proud of this independence from the Soviet Union. Three hours lecture per week.

SSCI 315 DEATH, DYING, AND BEREAVEMENT

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course is designed to present various ways in which social science views the human experience of death, dying, and bereavement. Drawing from sociology and psychology, this course introduces macro and micro level theories and associated concepts. Micro-level concepts and theories about the interaction patterns between the dying patients and the family, medical staff and others involved are examined. Also discussed are: societal (or macro level) theories of social change, the ethical problem of euthanasia, and the needs of the dying; the biological, social, and psychological factors in the lengthening of life; and the consequences of death, dying, and bereavement. Cross-cultural experiences with these phenomena are also examined.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 101) or Introduction to Sociology (SOCI 101) and 30 credit hours, or permission of instructor.

SSCI 370 RESEARCH METHODS IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course provides a comprehensive study of the scientific research methods utilized in the social and health sciences. Students are trained to be critical consumers of published research. Topics covered include the scientific method; critically evaluating research; qualitative and quantitative research analysis; operationalization and measurement, sampling techniques, surveys, field research, secondary data analysis, experimental research, correlation; and data management, analysis, and interpretation.

Prerequisites:
Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 101), or Introduction to Sociology (SOCI 101), or Introduction to Science and Technology of Behavior (SSCI 245), or Principles of Macroeconomics (ECON 101), or Principles of Microeconomics (ECON 103), Statistics (MATH 141) or equivalent course work is a Prerequisite/Corequisite. Expository writing (ENGL 101) or Oral and Written Expression (ENGL 102) are prerequisites for this writing intensive course. Additionally, students must have at least junior level status or permission of the instructor.

SSCI 291-295, 391-395, OR 491-495 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCE

Fall/Spring, 1 - 4 credit hours

An introductory or more advanced exploration of subjects not covered or only partially covered by other courses in any social science discipline. The course is specified in the semester class schedule. The course will address topics which require a broader scope or an examination in greater depth. Providing a different topic is selected, the student may take this course twice for credit.