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Social Science

HUSV 100 HUMAN SERVICES FORUM

Fall, 1 credit hour - 7 week course

This course introduces the student to the Applied Psychology curriculum in addition to aspects of the SUNY Canton First Year Educational Program. The course emphasizes aspects of the different tracks within the curriculum, the values, philosophy, and ethics of the profession along with awareness, critical thinking, problem solving, and related skills needed to be successful in academic pursuits. Student may not receive credit for both FYEP 101 and HUSV 100.

HUSV 201 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

An introduction to the field of Human Services work. This course provides a sense of the scope of practice, the various fields of work and the type of clients encountered. Students will receive an overview of models of development and intervention along with an introduction to ethical conduct. Writing Intensive course for the ABAP curriculum.

HUSV 281 FOUNDATIONS OF CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY AND TREATMENT

Spring, 3 credit hours

This course presents a study of the nature of addiction, including an overview of the addictions field, treatment approaches, assessment and diagnostic tools, treatment settings, and health concerns with substance- use disorders. Additional topics explored include pharmacology, toxicology and screening, family issues, and support groups.

Prerequisite: PSYC 101 and HUSV 201and SSCI 181 or permission of the instructor.

HUSV 305 PROFESSIONAL and ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES in HUMAN SERVICE PROFESSIONS

Spring, 3 credit hours

Students examine ethical and legal issues confronting professionals in human services careers. The course focuses on processes to address dilemmas and maintaining professional boundaries and wellness. Different professional codes of ethics are compared and contrasted.

Prerequisite: HUSV 201: Introduction to Human Services and/or Permission of Instructor.

HUSV 310 WORKING IN HUMAN SERVICE AGENCIES

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course introduces the student to an understanding of the basic skills and knowledge required of entry-level personnel in human service agencies. The course examines the conditions creating human needs and how agencies respond to these needs. Emphasis is on working with others in a human service agency, how these agencies get services to people in need, and how professionals help clients to function more effectively.

Prerequisite: HUSV 201: Introduction to Human Services and/or Permission of Instructor.

HUSV 325 GROUP LEADERSHIP SKILLS

Spring, 3 credit hours

This course introduces the leadership skills necessary for competence in the area of understanding systems and conducting groups. Topics addressed include working with different types of groups, the counseling process, and responding to cultural differences that may affect group process. Special populations such as children, adolescents, elderly, mental health and addiction, survivors of sexual abuse, and divorced couples are explored.

Prerequisite: PSYC 310: Counseling Theories

Corequisite: PSYC 410: Counseling Skills

HUSV 350 CARE COORDINATION, DOCUMENTATION, AND REFERRAL SKILLS

Fall, 3 credit hours

This course offers specialized, applied knowledge in the development of skills for the care coordination process, from intake to termination. Actual agency documentation forms give students the opportunity to prepare and manage files using electronic means. Referral skills are also be emphasized.

Prerequisite: SSCI 181 and HUSV 281 or permission of the instructor

HUSV 415 ADDICTION TREATMENT COLLOQUIUM

Fall, 3 credit hours

This course introduces students to specialized knowledge of topics in the field of addiction treatment. Students use this information to supplement the treatment process and to broaden their scope of practice.

Prerequisite: SSCI 181 and HUSV 281 or permission of the instructor

HUSV 420 SEMINAR IN HUMAN SERVICES

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

Issues related to public policy, professional behavior, interpersonal dynamics, and work-related skills related to human service settings will be the focus. Students will also be expected to pursue placements for HUSV 421. Students must obtain program faculty approval before registering. Three lecture hours per week.

Prerequisite: Intro to Human Services (HUSV 201) and Theory and Practice of Counseling (PSYC 310) or permission of instructor.

HUSV 421 PRACTICUM IN HUMAN SERVICES

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This practicum correlates with content taught in required courses in Psychology and Human Services. Students are assigned to field experience sites working under the direct supervision of a licensed Psychologist or Social Worker. This Practicum will provide students with the opportunity to put the knowledge and skills they have learned in the classroom and laboratory into practice in a human service setting. Students will not be directly involved in decisions regarding evaluations, diagnosis, and treatment planning as regulated by NYS Office of Professions Laws. Completion of 120 hours of field experience at an off-campus site.

Prerequisite: Seminar in Human Services (HUSV 420)

SSCI 181 ALCOHOL, DRUGS, AND SOCIETY

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 3

Students examine the various aspects of drug abuse and addiction including theories, models, individual drug classifications, and social consequences. Additional topics include the impact on family systems, overview of treatment approaches, and public policy in the United States.

SSCI 221 INTRODUCTION TO CHINESE HISTORY AND CULTURE

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 6

This course introduces students to the major aspects of Chinese history and culture. The broad outlines of the interaction between history and culture are developed though coverage of the major Chinese dynasties together with coverage of the influence of Chinese literature, language, and art, in the context of current social life. Three hours lecture per week.

SSCI 271 CONTEMPORARY GLOBAL ISSUES

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 6

This course introduces the students to global economic and political issues. The primary focus is on the global interplay between the changing resource base, dynamics of needs and concerns of human beings, and the economic, social, and political systems. The intent is to examine the extent to which our economics, social and political systems are successfully adjusting to changes in the underlying natural resource base (ecology), and contributing toward global sustainability of modernization and development. Specific topics covered each semester may vary. Three hours lecture per week.

SSCI 275 INTRODUCTION TO UKRAINE

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours GER 5

Introduction to major aspects of Ukrainian culture and history. Cultural topics related to family, religion, population demographics, government, arts, music, literature and education will be included. Contemporary life in Ukraine and the broad sweep of historical forces contributing to today’s culture will be the focus of the course. The recent events in Ukraine will be discussed, such as the election of October-December 2004 and the “Orange Revolution.” Ukraine gained its independence in 1991 and is fiercely proud of this independence from the Soviet Union. Three hours lecture per week.

SSCI 315 DEATH, DYING, AND BEREAVEMENT

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course is designed to present various ways in which social science views the human experience of death, dying, and bereavement. Drawing from sociology and psychology, this course will introduce macro and micro level theories and associated concepts. Micro-level concepts and theories about the interaction patterns between the dying patients and the family, medical staff and others involved will be examined. Also discussed will be: societal (or macro level) theories of social change, the ethical problem of euthanasia, and the needs of the dying; the biological, social, and psychological factors in the lengthening of life; and the consequences of death, dying, and bereavement. Cross-cultural experiences with these phenomena will also be examined. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 101) or Introduction to Sociology (SOCI 101) and 30 credit hours, or permission of instructor.

SSCI 370 RESEARCH METHODS IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES

Fall/Spring, 3 credit hours

This course provides a comprehensive study of the scientific research process utilized in the social and health sciences. Students are trained to be critical consumers of published research. Topics covered include the underlying theory of research; critically evaluating research; qualitative research analysis; quantitative research analysis; operationalization and measurement, sampling techniques, surveys, field research, secondary data analysis, experimental research, causation and statistically significant correlation; and data management and presentation. Three hours lecture per week.

Prerequisites:
Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 101), or Introduction to Sociology (SOCI 101), or Introduction to Science and Technology of Behavior (SSCI 245), or Principles of Macroeconomics (ECON 101), or Principles of Microeconomics (ECON 103), Statistics (MATH 141) or equivalent course work is a Prerequisite/Corequisite. Expository writing (ENGL 101) or Oral and Written Expression (ENGL 102) are prerequisites for this writing intensive course. Additionally, students must have at least junior level status or permission of the instructor.

SSCI 291-295, 391-395, OR 491-495 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCE

Fall/Spring, 1 - 4 credit hours

An introductory or more advanced exploration of subjects not covered or only partially covered by other courses in any social science discipline. The course is specified in the semester class schedule. The course will address topics which require a broader scope or an examination in greater depth. Providing a different topic is selected, the student may take this course twice for credit.